U.S. Missile Defence Agency SM-3 Shoots Down Separating IRBM Target Successfully

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Sea-based Missile Defense Flight Test Results in Successful Intercept
    UNITED STATES - 15 April 2011

    The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Navy sailors aboard the Aegis destroyer USS O’KANE (DDG 77), and soldiers from the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command operating from the 613th Air and Space Operations Center at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, successfully conducted a flight test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) element of the nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System, resulting in the intercept of a separating ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean.

    This successful test demonstrated the capability of the first phase of the European Phased Adaptive Approach (EPAA) announced by the President in September, 2009.

    At 2:52 a.m. EDT (6:52 p.m. April 15 Marshall Island Time), an Intermediate-Range Ballistic Missile target was launched from the Reagan Test Site, located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, approximately 2,300 miles southwest of Hawaii. The target flew in a northeasterly direction towards a broad ocean area in the Pacific Ocean.

    Following target launch, a forward-based AN/TPY-2 X-band transportable radar, located on Wake Island, detected and tracked the threat missile. The radar sent trajectory information to the Command, Control, Battle Management, and Communications (C2BMC) system, which processed and transmitted remote target data to the USS O’KANE.

    The destroyer, located to the west of Hawaii, used the data to develop a fire control solution and launch the SM-3 Block IA missile approximately 11 minutes after the target was launched.

    As the IRBM target continued along its trajectory, the firing ship’s AN/SPY-1 radar detected and acquired the ballistic missile target. The firing ship’s Aegis BMD weapon system uplinked target track information to the SM-3 Block IA missile. The SM-3 maneuvered to a point in space as designated by the fire control solution and released its kinetic warhead. The kinetic warhead acquired the target, diverted into its path, and, using only force of a direct impact, destroyed the threat in a “hit-to-kill” intercept.

    During the test the C2BMC system, operated by soldiers from the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command, received data from all assets and provided situational awareness of the engagement to U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Northern Command and U.S. Strategic Command.

    The two demonstration Space Tracking and Surveillance Satellites (STSS), launched by MDA in 2009, successfully acquired the target missile, providing stereo “birth to death” tracking of the target.

    Today’s event, designated Flight Test Standard Missile-15 (FTM-15), was the most challenging test to date, as it was the first Aegis BMD version 3.6.1 intercept against an intermediate-range target (range 1,864 to 3,418 miles) and the first Aegis BMD 3.6.1 engagement relying on remote tracking data. The ability to use remote radar data to engage a threat ballistic missile greatly increases the battle space and defended area of the SM-3 missile.

    Initial indications are that all components performed as designed. Program officials will spend the next several months conducting an extensive assessment and evaluation of system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

    FTM-15 is the 21st successful intercept, in 25 attempts, for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002. Across all BMDS elements, this is the 45th successful hit-to-kill intercept in 58 flight tests since 2001.

    Aegis BMD is the sea-based midcourse component of the MDA's Ballistic Missile Defense System and is designed to intercept and destroy short to intermediate-range ballistic missile threats. MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD Program.


    April 15, 2011 - A Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) is launched from the USS O’KANE in a joint Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test conducted April 15th. The SM-3 successfully intercepted a target missile launched from the Reagan Test Site, located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

    SM-3 Launch
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    Source: U.S. Missile Defense Agency
     
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  3. youngindian

    youngindian Senior Member Senior Member

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  4. youngindian

    youngindian Senior Member Senior Member

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  5. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    any video of the test ???
     
  6. youngindian

    youngindian Senior Member Senior Member

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    nope saya sir.............
     
  7. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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  8. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    US puts Europe's anti-Iran shield to test over Pacific

    WASHINGTON: The US military said it shot down an intermediate-range ballistic missile target over the Pacific on Friday in the "most challenging" test yet of its work on a planned antimissile shield for Europe against Iran.

    The Pentagon said the successful test of Lockheed Martin Corp and Raytheon Co hardware "demonstrated the capability" of the first phase of a layered, multibillion dollar antimissile shield, which is due to be in place in Europe by year-end.

    The technology may also be adapted to defend against North Korea, another focus of US antimissile efforts, and ultimately to bolster existing US ground-based defenses.

    The test west of Hawaii marked the first time Lockheed's shipboard Aegis combat system had been used to intercept a target with a range greater than 1,900 miles (3,040 kms), said the Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency, or MDA.

    Dubbed Flight Test Standard Missile-15, it was also the first Aegis test to rely on missile tracking data gathered by a powerful on-shore radar station. The ability to use remote radar data to counter an enemy ballistic missile "greatly increases the battle space and defended area" of the Standard Missile-3 interceptor built by Raytheon and used to destroy the target, MDA said.

    Previous sea-based Aegis intercept tests have featured shorter-range targets. This was the 21st successful intercept in 25 attempts for the Aegis program since flight testing began in 2002, the agency said. The last two intercept tests of a US ground-based antimissile bulwark, managed by Boeing Co and aimed at protecting US soil from even longer-range missiles, have failed.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...-to-test-over-Pacific/articleshow/8002768.cms
     
  9. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    None of these trolls in the middle east are ever going to war against NATO! They where just hopeing that they could act tough with couple of gunpowder rockets facing Europe and Israel now thats out of the way they might as well sit their ass down and stop yelling. Spineless Arabs.
     
  10. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    STSS Demonstration Satellites, Built by Northrop Grumman, Show New 'Remote Cueing' Capabilities During Aegis Test
    UNITED STATES - 6 JULY 2011

    PACIFIC MISSILE RANGE FACILITY, Hawaii, July 6, 2011 -- The Space Tracking and Surveillance System (STSS) demonstration satellites, built and operated by Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC), contributed to a successful sea-based missile defense test April 15 by acquiring, after being cued remotely, a target missile during the midcourse phase of its flight.

    STSS demonstrators also tracked the target – an intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM) – from midcourse to termination, according to the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA). Sensor payloads onboard each satellite were designed and built by Raytheon Company (NYSE:RTN).

    The target was intercepted when an SM-3 missile released its kinetic warhead, hitting the IRBM and destroying the IRBM on impact, MDA said.

    "This event showed the flexibility of the STSS satellites. They were cued remotely by forward-based radar in the Command, Control, Battle Management and Communications system, which is a key capability for a future operational constellation," said Doug Young, vice president, missile defense and warning for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector in Redondo Beach, Calif.

    "The event also provided significant risk reduction for a follow-on, operational system. It closely emulated a large part of the communication chain that would be used in an operational engagement," Young added.

    The exercise began when the IRBM was launched from the Reagan Test Site located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands approximately 2,300 miles southwest of Hawaii. Following the target missile's launch, a forward-based AN/TPY-2, X-band, transportable radar located on Wake Island detected and tracked the threat missile.

    According to MDA, the radar sent trajectory information to the Command, Control, Battle Management and Communications system, which processed and transmitted remote target data to an Aegis destroyer, the USS O'Kane. The destroyer used the data to develop a fire control solution and launch an SM-3 Block 1A missile approximately 11 minutes after the target was launched.

    "This was an especially complex test for the STSS demonstrators," said David Bloodgood, Northrop Grumman STSS program manager. "The timing of the launch required the team to develop target acquisition strategies similar to an operational system. The inter-satellite crosslink was used to communicate with one of the STSS satellites during the test. Additionally, the IRBM was the most threat-representative missile the demonstration satellites have tracked to date."



    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     

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