U.N. keen to help India in dealing with malaria, HIV

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by Son of Govinda, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. Son of Govinda

    Son of Govinda Regular Member

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    The Hindu : Health : U.N. keen to help India in dealing with malaria, HIV

    The United Nations would like to showcase India's experiences and best practices in dealing with maternal and child health issues for others to follow, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has said.

    Commending India's success in combating polio, Mr. Moon also offered to help India deal with diseases such as malaria, tetanus and measles and HIV-transmission related mortality.

    Mr. Ban, on an official visit to India, called on Union Health and Family Welfare Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad here on Thursday.

    During their interaction, Mr. Azad told the visiting dignitary that health had been identified as the key thrust area in the 12 Five-Year plan and public spending on healthcare was set to increase with greater outlay for the public health sector.

    In the field of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH), special initiatives have been undertaken to ensure access to health services to un-served and underserved populations that include people living in predominantly tribal and hilly areas, the Minister said.

    Since prevention by raising awareness is an effective way of dealing with challenges, Mr. Azad pointed out that his Ministry had taken a new initiative of reaching out to the masses through the medium of television and radio channels so that the benefits of programmes such as the Janani Suraksha Yojana, Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakram, special programmes launched to combat neonatal and infant mortality like operationalising essential and advanced new-born care at various levels of health facilities, Home-Based Newborn Care Scheme and Mother and Child Tracking System could actually reach people. He also informed Mr. Ban about the steps taken by the government to prevent non-communicable diseases.
     
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