The Gorkha & the Khukri

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by TrueSpirit, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    The Gorkha & the Khukri


    [​IMG]

    Top to bottom :

    1. Mk1; blade length 35cm, weight 785 grams, handle stick tang, issued circa 1903, and the truest Mk issued kukri to Nepali made and used kukri, and may have originated from a 2/8th battalion issue kukri.
    2. Battalion issue kukri pre-WW1; blade length 32.5cm, weight 352 grams, partial tang
    3. Battalion issue kukri pre-WW1; blade length 32.5cm, weight 568 grams, partial tang
    4. WW1 1/2nd issue kukri; blade length 33cm; weight 509 grams, stick tang
    5. Battalion issue kukri pre-WW1; blade length 33cm, weight 511 grams, partial tang
    6. WW1* 2/10th issue kukri; blade length 32.5cm, weight 544 grams, stick tang
    7. WW2 Dehradun made issue kukri; blade length 32cm, weight 496 grams, stick tang
    8. WW2 2/8th Regimental issue kukri; made at the regimental centre in Quetta, blade length 32cm, weight 615 grams, alloy metal stick tang
    9. WW2 general issue 1/2nd kukri; blade length 32cm, weight 450 grams, stick tang


    Keep on reading...Would post more.
     
  2.  
  3. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    Organization of an Indian Gorkha Unit

    Section = 10 Riflemen, commanded by 1 Naik (corporal)
    Platoon = 3 Sections, commanded by Subedar (JCO - will come to this later)
    Company = 3 Platoons, commanded by Major & Coy HQ
    Battalion = 4 Rifle Companies, commanded by Colonel, Lt. Col is 2IC (second-in-command) + Support Company (MGs, Mortar platoon, pioneer platoon, sniper section, etc.) + HQ Company (cooks, clerks, transport, etc.); making a grand total of about 750 - 800 personnel per Battalion.

    Each Battalion belongs to a certain specific Regiment and follows the traditions, norms, etc. of that Regiment. There are 7 Gorkha Regiments in the Indian Army, the 1st Gorkha Rifles with 5 battalions (1/1 GR, 2/1 GR, etc.), the 3rd Gorkha Rilfes with 5 battalions, the 4th Gorkha Rifles with 6 battalions, the 5th Gorkha Rifles (Frontier Force) with 6 Battalions, the 8th Gorkha Rifles with 6 battalions, the 9th Gorkha Riles with 6 battalions, and the 11th Gorkha Rifles with 7 battalions. You might've noticed that the regiments skip some numbers, that's because those were the regiments that the British took with them after Indian independence in 1947 (the 2nd, 6th, 7th and 10th - which sadly no longer exist, all having been amalgamated into a greatly reduced "Royal Gurkha Rifles").

    The 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 8th Gorkha Rifles recruits predominantly from Gurung and Magar tribes of western Nepal, the 9th recruits primarily high-caste Chettri and Bahun, and the 11th recruits primarily from Rai and Limbu tribes of western Nepal. Gorkhas are also recruited in
    large numbers in the Assam Rifles and the Naga Regiment.

    The ranks in a Gorkha battalion are roughly:

    Rifleman:
    Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs):
    Lance-Naik (L/Cpl) - (one stripe on right arm, if I remember correctly. The other arm bears the insignia of the Division to which the battalion is serving with)
    Naik (Corporal) - (two stripes)
    Havildar (Sergeant) - three stripes
    Havildar-Major (Sergeant-Major) - (three stripes with an Ashoka Lion on top).
    There are a couple of other ranks in between that I'm not too sure about - Company Havildar-Major, Battalion Havildar-Major, etc. - I know some of them wear an additional insignia in the form of a leather bracelet with an Ashoka-Lion, not sure of the details, though.

    Junior-Commissioned Officers (JCOs):

    This layer of ranks used to be called the Viceroy's Commissioned Officers (VCOs) in the British days. They are picked from the NCO ranks - in other words, you don't get commissioned automatically as a JCO, you have to pay your dues in the ranks. In the old days (and even nowadays) they served as a vital link between the officers and the troops (both coming from such different backgrounds, I guess they needed old hands around to make things run properly). They wear rank badges similar to commissioned officers (except with an additional yellow-reb strip of ribbon on the epaulettes just above the regimental insignia) and are accorded a lot of the same respect.
    Naib-Subedar (one star on shoulder epaulette)
    Subedar (two-stars)
    Subedar-Major (Ashoka-Lion). The SM is one of the most important figures in the battalion, having had the longest service, many times longer than the Colonel's, and is his close confidant in many matters ranging from Regimental and Gorkha customs and traditions, to
    training, to welfare of the troops, etc.

    Commissioned Officers (in this case, mostly Indian, and there is stiff competition among the officer candidates to get a commission in the Gorkhas) - they're more or less the same as in the British Army:

    Lt. - two star
    Captain - three stars
    Major - Ashoka Lion
    Lt. Col (2IC) - Ashoka Lion and one star (nickname "Lamb" - since in case of any trouble from higher-ups he's the first one to be "offered for sacrifice" )
    Colonel (CO) - Ashoka Lion and two stars, with red tabs on the collar and a red band on his Gorkha-hat (nickname "Tiger" for obvious reasons)
     
  4. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    The final part of the Passing Out Ceremony is the honor of receiving the Khukri sidearm, which will follow the Jawan to battle for the rest of his career and beyond.
     
    arnabmit and Ankit Purohit like this.
  5. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Counter Insurgency Drill (Training) (9 Gorkha Regiment, Varanasi).

    ~ The Drill Instructor is the one who is playing the role of a villager complete with hut, goats and rural dress, during cordon search operation exercises, which being one of the vital component to anti-Terror and COIN Ops. ~
     
  6. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    IC-8947 CAPTAIN GURBACHAN SINGH SALARIA
    PARAM VIR CHAKRA, 3/1 GORKHA RIFLES

    On 5 December 1961, 3/1 Gorkha Rifles was ordered to clear a roadblock established by the gendarmerie at a strategic roundabout at Elizabethville, Katanga. The plan was that one company with 2 Swedish armoured cars would attack the position frontally and Captain Gurbachan Singh Salaria with two sections of Gorkhas and two Swedish armoured personnel carriers would advance towards this roadblock from the airfield to act as a cutting-off force.

    Captain Salaria with his small force arrived at a distance of 1500 yards from the roadblock at approximately 1312 hours on 5 December 1961 and came under heavy automatic and small-arms fire from an undetected enemy position dug in on his right flank. The enemy also had two armoured cars and about 90 men opposing Captain Salaria’s small force.

    Captain Salaria appreciating that he had run into a subsidiary roadblock and ambush and that this enemy force might reinforce the strategic roundabout and thus jeopardize the main operation, decided to remove this opposition. He led a charge with bayonets, khukris, and grenades supported by a rocket launcher. In this gallant engagement, Captain Salaria killed 40 of the enemy and knocked out the two armoured cars. This unexpected bold action completely demoralised the enemy who fled despite their numerical superiority and protected positions.

    Captain Salaria was wounded in his neck by a burst of automatic fire but continued to fight till he collapsed due to loss of blood. Captain Salaria’s gallant action prevented any enemy movement of the enemy force towards the main battle scene and thus contributed very largely to the success of the main battalion’s action at the roundabout and prevented the encirclement of UN Headquarters in Elizabethville. Captain Salaria subsequently died of his wounds.

    Captain Salaira’s personal example, utter disregard for personal safety and dauntless leadership inspired his small but gallant force of sixteen Gorkhas to hold on to their position, dominate the enemy and to inflict heavy casualties despite the enemy’s superiority in numbers and tactical position.
    Captain Gurbachan Singh Salaria’s leadership, courage, and unflinching devotion to duty and disregard for personal safety were in the best traditions of our Army.
     
  7. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    Major Dhan Singh Thapa (June 10, 1928 – September 6, 2005) PARAM VIR CHAKRA
    1st Battalion, 8th Gorkha Rifles Regiment.

    Dhan Singh Thapa was born to P. S. Thapa in a Magar family at Shimla, Himachal Pradesh. He was commissioned into the 8th Gurkha Rifles on 28 August 1949.

    He was involved in a major action in Ladakh during the Sino-Indian War. The Sirijap valley, north of Pangong Lake in Ladakh, was considered vital for the defence of Chushul airfield. The 1/8 Gurkha Rifles had outposts there to thwart any Chinese encroachment in the area. One of these outposts named Sirijap-1 was held by a platoon of 'C' Company under the command of Major Thapa when the Chinese attacked on 20 October 1962.
    At 06:00 on 20 October 1962, the Chinese opened a barrage of artillery and mortar fire over Sirijap-1 post. The shelling continued till 08:30 and the whole area was set ablaze. Some shells fell on the command post and damaged the wireless set. This put the post out of communication. The Chinese then attacked in overwhelming numbers. Major Thapa and his men repulsed the attack, inflicting heavy casualties. The Chinese mounted another attack in greater numbers after shelling the area with artillery and mortar fire.

    Major Thapa once again repulsed the attack, inflicting heavy losses on the Chinese. A short while later, a third Chinese attack included tanks in support of the infantry. The defenders were weakened by the casualties suffered in earlier attacks, but held out while the ammunition lasted. When the Chinese finally overran the post, Major Thapa jumped out of his trench and killed many intruders in hand-to-hand fighting. He was eventually overpowered and captured.

    For his gallant act, Major Dhan Singh Thapa was honoured with the highest wartime gallantry medal, the Param Vir Chakra. He was believed to have been killed in this engagement, and the original citation reflects this.

    He was later discovered to have been taken prisoner and after his release from the POW camp, he resumed his military career. He retired as Lieutenant-Colonel.
     
  8. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    And, behold this......Here comes the legend, the institution: Field Marshall SAM BAHADUR

    [​IMG]

    FIELD MARSHALL SAM BAHADUR
    8th Gorkha Rifles
    Happy Valley, Shillong, Meghalaya, INDIA
     
  9. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    Now, some old images:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    HATS FELT GURKHA
    By Colonel JR Cawthorne

    It is now one hundred years since the fore-runner of Hats, i.e. Felt, which has become synonymous with the Gurkha soldier, was first introduced into Gurkha Regiments for field service wear. The hat went on to be worn by Gurkha units on the frontiers of India and in all the operational theatres during both World Wars. Today, it is worn by Gurkha units of the British and Indian Armies, the Nepalese Army and the many Gurkha police and security units that have been raised around the world. In The British Army, it is no longer worn in the field and its wear is now primary confined to parades and ceremonial duties.

    The origins of Hats, Felt, Gurkha date from the beginning of the 20th Century when a substitute form of head dress was being actively sought to replace the Kilmarnock Hat for wear on field service. The Kilmarnock, which had been adopted during the second half of the 19th Century and had become the universal head dress of Gurkha Regiments, had very little to commend it when worn in the field. It neither gave protection from the burning sun nor the heavy monsoon rain. Over the years, a number of modifications had been made to it both by the authorities and individual battalions. In 1864, the Adjutant-General’s Department in India had sanctioned khaki covers for wear on field service1. Later a flap was hooked on to the cover at the back of the Kilmarnock to protect the neck from the sun. When 4th Gurkhas went to China in 1900 following the Boxer Rebellion, a wired brim, narrow in front and wide at the back, was fitted over the Kilmarnock as protection from the sun2.

    During the 2nd Afghan War of 1878-80, 3rd Goorkhas had for a time worn a puggaree. This drew derision from 2nd Goorkhas, because in Nepal the puggaree was viewed as being the outward sign of a man from the plains3. Nevertheless, following the Tirah campaign on the North West Frontier in 1897, 2nd Goorkhas also considered replacing the Kilmarnock with the puggaree for wear by both British officers and Gurkhas. The main object appeared to be not so much to give protection against the elements, but rather to make it more difficult for rebel tribesmen to pick off British officers. The proposal did not, however, find much favour and this form of head dress was not adopted4.

    At the time of the 2nd Boer War in South Africa, the slouch hat, worn by the Dominion Forces of the British Empire, was becoming an increasingly popular form of head dress with British troops in the field. This may have influenced the introduction of a hat of similar design within Gurkha Regiments. It was during the Waziristan Blockade in 1901, that the 1st Battalion 2nd (Prince of Wales’ Own) Gurkha Rifles tried out a new hat advocated by one of its officers, Lieutenant Bechar. It consisted of a several layers of cloth covered on both sides with puttoo or home spun tweed. It was criss-cross machine stitched, giving it a certain amount of stiffness to help maintain its shape. Sometimes known as the Kashmir hat, it was fitted with a light puggaree, ventilating holes and a chin strap. The whole effect resembled a slouch hat, affording protection both from the sun and the rain. 2nd Gurkha Rifles subsequently adopted the hat for field service. Regimental histories record that a similar head dress was introduced into other Gurkha Regiments during the same period. Initially procured from unofficial sources, it was eventually sanctioned by Army Headquarters and issued through ordnance channels under the nomenclature of Hats, Felt, Gurkha5.

    The Tibet Expedition 1903 – 04 became the last campaign when the Kilmarnock was worn in the field by 8th Gurkha Rifles operating at altitudes in excess of 18,000 ft. Thereafter, the Kilmarnock has only been worn on parades and ceremonial duties. The Zakka Khel Expedition, on the North West Frontier of India, in 1908 was the first campaign when the new field service head dress was worn by 5th and elements of 6th Gurkha Rifles.

    Not unexpectedly, Regiments and Battalions soon began to fashion the hat to their own designs. Some wore it with either the left or right side hooked up; puggarees were added, with Regimental coloured piping; and Regimental badges and or flashes were incorporated. In the years following the 1st World War, the brim became flat and stiffened, as we know it today, and the hat was worn well tilted over one ear and a size or two smaller than necessary for effect. This laid most of the skull bare to the elements, thereby defeating the original object of the hat to give protection from the sun and rain6. Initially, Hats, Felt, Gurkha were only worn by Gurkha officers and soldiers, but photographic evidence suggests that British officers began to wear the hat in the 1920s. By the end of the 2nd World War, the hat was being worn by all ranks in most Gurkha Regiments.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  11. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    The Spoils of War!

    Subadar Bombahadur Rai of the 4th Battalion with Japanese Swords captured in BURMA, 1944
     
  12. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    A Khukri Story

    [​IMG]

    Using a Khukuri

    Ever since I was stationed as a liason officer to a Soviet intellegence unit in Kashmir in the middle-to-late 60s, I have been a fan of the khukuri. In India I also found other very important things such as God, meditation, and yoga--all of which have helped me survive. Of course the various guns and knives I have carried over the years have, at times, helped me survive also. One definitely needs inner as well as outer survival skills in my opinion.
    But back to khukuris. In my opinion, they make an excellent close-quarters weapon as well as excellent and durable field knives and choppers.

    Before I begin about the battle worthiness of the khukuri, I would like to say several important things. First of all even in special forces operations, field knives are used 99-100% of the time for mundane tasks such as bush clearing, shelter buiding, firewood gathering, opening crates and cans, and as a pry bar. A well-made khukuri is excellent for all of this. Secondly one tends to fight best with the weapons one frequently trains with. If you are a revolver shooter and someone hands you a $3,000 custom 1911, you won't shoot it as well as the revolver until you practice sufficiently with it. The same goes with fighting knives (IMO).

    As I don't know how much training background you have in stopping determined attackers, I will talk a little bit about how such people are usually stopped along with the khukuri's fighting assets.

    1. Severing the spinal column is usually the most reliable way to stop a determined attacker. Whatever is below this area is paralyzed. The neck is the best area as this paralyzes the arms. Because of the curved blade, the khukuri excells at this. Lower hits will cause a person to fall down, thus making them an easier target. The khukuri, as well as any heavy (1+ lbs.) slashing blade does this job very well.

    2. Smashing the skull if done with a heavy blow will,at the least, usually stun if not stop an opponent. Howver I don't know how it might affect large animals like bears, etc. But if such an opportunity presents itself, the khukuri will do a good job--as will any heavy blade.

    3. Severing or breaking shoulder bones and limbs are also good ways to stop or at least slow down a fight. A severed limb is enough to make any but the toughest, most determined opponent stop. If it doesn't, the loss of blood will lower the blood pressure in 3-4 minutes so that the brain will not receive oxygen, and the oponent will pass out. Smashed bones also disable tactical necessities like hands an feet. The khukuri's curved blade excels at dismemberment. However any sharp heavy blade will do the job also.

    4. Making wounds (thrust or slash) that will result in rapid blood loss. Slashing major veins and arteries can be done with any knife, but the heavier and longer the knife, the better. The khukuri's curved blade excells at this. All heavy knives do well also. However one of the most deadly moves in a knife fight is the reverse cut; this is where long heavy Bowie knives and naval cutlasses dominate. A reverse move can also be done with a khukuri, but because of its dull spine, it will only break or smash bone; whereas a heavy double bladed knife can cut deeply and perhaps even can severe a limb.
    Thrusting deep into vital organs will also cause severe blood loss. This puts the khukuri at a slight disadvantage. Because the tip is significantly lower that the line of thrust, it is harder to hit the exact spot being aimed at. Again bowie knives, cutlasses, parangs, etc. do this job more easily. However the khukuri is not at such a disadvantage as many think it is. When I spar with others and make a thrust, the point I am aiming at is seldom there as my rubber bladed knife tip makes contact with my adversary's skin. However when I use my real khukuri and quick thrust at a marked point on a box, I find that the point is an inch or so off, whereas while using a straight blade, I almost always hit the spot I aiming for. However in the heat of battle, I think this might be a moot point.

    I have also seen khukuris penetrate Level IIA body armour with a hard thrust, but of course, it couldn't slash itself through--but then neither could a full-size sword.

    ---'Lone Tree' 11/01
     
    arnabmit, ALBY, Kunal Biswas and 2 others like this.
  13. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    Jai Mahakali, Aayo Gorkhali !!!!!!!!!!!!!

    [​IMG]

    1939-45 WWII - 4th Gurkha Rifles leaping into Battle
     
  14. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    War brings Death, Pain & Tragedy

    [​IMG]

    II WORLD WAR: Bunker Busters, BURMA
     
    arnabmit, ALBY, Kunal Biswas and 2 others like this.
  15. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,455
    Likes Received:
    898
    Location:
    visakhapatnam
    you seem like the one in the oicture:shocked:
     
    arnabmit likes this.
  16. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    My ancestors came down from mountains but we still retain the "Pahadi" look & build :)

    However, Gorkha is a different breed, altogether.....
     
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  17. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    The Decorated Gorkhas

    [​IMG]

    DECORATED GURKHAS

    The Victoria Cross is the highest award in the British Army for gallantry when facing the enemy. It is awarded without regard of rank. Since 1858 The Brigade of Gurkhas has received 26 Victoria Crosses. Of these, 13 have been awarded to British officers and 13 to Nepalese Gurkhas. Each Victoria Cross won has its own unique story of courage and devotion.

    10 Facts about Gurkhas and the VC

    1. The elderly father of Rifleman Lachiman Gurung VC was carried for 11 days from Nepal to Delhi to see his son decorated by His Excellency the Viceroy of India, Field Marshal Lord Wavell.

    2. Enough metal remains from the Sebastopol cannon for 85 new Victoria Crosses. The famous metal is locked at Central Ordnance Depot, Donnington.

    3. Unlike any other award for gallantry the VC is not made in a die nor struck but cast exclusively by Hancocks and Co, London.

    4. 12 medals are made at one time with remaining stock held by the MOD. Thus, there has never been a VC made for a specific individual.

    5. According to regimental sources, no photographs existed of Rifleman Thaman Gurung when he was awarded the VC posthumously. His officers asked men with similar features to pose for artists. Sketching continued until the Rifleman's comrades agreed the portrait was an accurate representation.

    6. HM, Queen Victoria replaced the original words 'For Bravery' on the cross with 'For Valour'. 'For Bravery,' she said, 'would lead to the inference that only those are deemed brave who have got the Cross".

    7. Rifleman Kulbir Thapa VC had never been under fire until the battle where he was awarded his Victoria Cross

    8. Measuring less than five foot, Rifleman Lachiman Gurung would fail today's army selection criteria.

    9. VC holder, Rifleman Ganju Lama's real name was Gyamsto. While not an enthnic Gurkha, the war effort welcomed all willing men. With a stroke of a clerk's pen, his name at enlistment and subsequent entry on honour rolls is Ganju, not Gyamtso.

    10. During the relief of Lucknow in 1857, a record 24 VCs were awarded in one day.
     
    arnabmit, ALBY and Kunal Biswas like this.
  18. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    [​IMG]

    Gorkhas At Tawang
     
  19. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,891
    Likes Received:
    824
    Location:
    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    Some more interesting stuff on the way...
     
  20. rohit b3

    rohit b3 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2012
    Messages:
    375
    Likes Received:
    193
    is it GORKHAS or GURKHAS??
     
  21. Ankit Purohit

    Ankit Purohit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    616
    Location:
    Mumbai

    :salute::salute::salute::salute::salute:
     
    arnabmit and TrueSpirit like this.

Share This Page