Should India change its national anthem?

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by PredictablyMalicious, Dec 27, 2013.

?

India should change its national anthem

  1. Agree

    34.3%
  2. Disagree

    65.7%
  1. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    I really dislike India's current national anthem. Don't get me wrong, I understand and appreciate the noble intentions behind the composition but it is just so powerless. It fails to inspire a nationalist fervour and sounds too peaceful. For an aspiring superpower and a nation that is on the rise, the anthem is too concerned with ethnic/religious diversity and has nothing to say about progress. Moreover, Jana Gana Mana simply lacks musical sophistication and is not pleasing in an aesthetic sense; that is perhaps its greatest defect. Hence it follows that India should change its national anthem. Agree or disagree?
     
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  3. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    @atheisthindu,

    This is the first sane thread which you have created on DFI ! Kudos to you :thumb:

    My vote goes for changing the national anthem not because of the reasons you have mentioned but for the fact that, the song was written by Tagore to praise a Br!turd King in the first place as I had read and heard.

    IMO, "Vande Mataram" or any "Sanskrit Song" needs to be adopted as our national anthem.
     
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  4. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Here's an interesting article which I came across

    Meaning of NATIONAL ANTHEM OF INDIA - A MUST READ - five s Pdf Download

    Facts about "Jana Gana Mana" - Just a thought for the National Anthem! How well do you know about it?

    To begin with, India's national anthem, Jana Gana Mana Adhinayaka, was written by Rabindranath Tagore in honour of King George V and the Queen of England when they visited India in 1919.

    To honour their visit Pandit Motilal Nehru had the five stanzas included, which are in praise of the King and Queen. (And most of us think it is in the praise of our great motherland!!!)

    The Jana Gana Mana Adhinayaka implies that King George V is the lord of the masses and Bharata Bhagya Vidhata is "the bestower of good fortune".

    Following is a translation of the five stanzas that glorify the King:

    First stanza: (Indian) People wake up remembering your good name and ask for your blessings and they sing your glories. (Tava shubha naame jaage;tava shubha aashish maage, gaaye tava jaya gaatha)

    Second stanza: Around your throne people of all religions come and give their love and anxiously wait to hear your kind words.

    Third stanza: Praise to the King for being the charioteer, for leading the ancient travellers beyond misery.

    Fourth stanza: Drowned in the deep ignorance and suffering, poverty-stricken, unconscious country? Waiting for the wink of your eye and your mother's (the Queen's) true protection.

    Fifth stanza: In your compassionate plans, the sleeping Bharat (India) will wake up. We bow down to your feet O' Queen, and glory to Rajeshwara (the King).

    This whole poem does not indicate any love for the Motherland but depicts a bleak picture. When you sing Jana Gana Mana Adhinayaka, whom are you glorifying? Certainly not the Motherland. Is it God? The poem does not indicate that.

    It is time now to understand the original purpose and the implication of this, rather than blindly sing as has been done the past fifty years.

    Nehru chose the present national anthem as opposed to Vande Mataram because he thought that it would be easier for the band to play!!! It was an absurd reason but Today for that matter bands have advanced and they can very well play any music. So they can as well play Vande Mataram, which is a far better composition in praise of our dear Motherland India.
     
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  5. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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  6. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Such a :bs: article! Without even an iota of truth!

     
  7. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Why is that so ? care to elaborate ?
     
  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Here is the controversy in Wikipedia: Jana Gana Mana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  9. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Many historians aver that the newspaper reports cited above were misguided. The confusion arose in British Indian press since a different song, "Badshah Humara" written in Hindi by Rambhuj Chaudhary, was sung on the same occasion in praise of the monarch. The nationalist Indian press stated this difference of events clearly:-

    Even the report of the annual session of the Indian National Congress of December 1911 stated this difference:

    On 10 November 1937 Tagore wrote a letter to Mr Pulin Bihari Sen about the controversy. That letter in Bengali can be found in Tagore's biography Ravindrajivani, volume II page 339 by Prabhatkumar Mukherjee.

    Again in his letter of 19 March 1939 Tagore writes,

    Moreover, Tagore was hailed as a patriot who wrote other songs too apart from "Jana gana Mana" lionizing the Indian independence movement.He renounced his knighthood in protest against the 1919 Jallianwala Bagh Massacre. The Knighthood i.e. the title of 'Sir' was conferred on him by the same King George V after receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature for "Gitanjali" from the government of Sweden. Two of Tagore's more politically charged compositions, "Chitto Jetha Bhayshunyo" ("Where the Mind is Without Fear" :Gitanjali Poem#35) and "Ekla Chalo Re" ("If They Answer Not to Thy Call, Walk Alone"), gained mass appeal, with the latter favoured by Gandhi and Nettie.

    @kseeker Why do you think Tagore refused Knighthood? Because he was all praise for the King of England?
     
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  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    There are threads on who Tagore wrote the anthem for.

    I get goose bumps every single time the national anthem is played.
     
  11. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Rediff On The NeT: Controversy over Jana Gana Mana takes a new turn

    Controversy over Jana Gana Mana takes a new turn

    Sharat Pradhan in Lucknow

    The controversy over the actual composer of the national anthem took yet another twist this week, with Calcutta-based Rabindra Sangeet exponent Subinoy Roy facing a defamation suit in the court of the Darjeeling chief judicial magistrate.

    The suit, filed by the Communist Party (Revolutionary Marxist), takes exception to a statement made by Roy in a recent edition of The Pioneer, in which he says that a Gorkha was not capable of the kind of musical talent required to have composed the music for the Indian national anthem.

    Roy refutes claims that the tune for Jana Gana Mana was composed by Captain Ram Singh, member of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose's Indian National Army and well-known music composer, and avers that Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore, who penned the words, had also composed the music.

    The statement that a Gorkha was not capable of such musical ability, the CPRM holds in its suit, is libellous. The suit also names the editor, publisher and Calcutta correspondent of The Pioneer. A similar suit has also been filed by the All Gorkha Students Union.

    Captain Ram Singh, meanwhile, has expressed anguish over parochial considerations being attached to the history of the national anthem.

    Reacting to claims by Netaji's family members and leading Bengali musicians that the national anthem "could not have been composed by a Gorkha", the 80-year old INA veteran lamented that "things in our country have come to such a petty pass, that sectarian and regional factors now dominate the thinking of the people."

    The genesis of the controversy owes to the publication of an advertisement, in a Calcutta daily, claiming that the music for Jana Gana Mana was composed by Captain Ram Singh. The ad, issued by the Gorkha Hill Council on Netaji's birth centenary, has sought to highlight this as one among the Gorkhas's many achievements.

    Among the first to take exception was Dr Sisir Bose, Netaji's nephew and director of the Netaji Research Bureau in Calcutta. Subinoy Roy and composer Ananda Shankar also issued statements contradicting the ad.

    "The anthem was set to tune by none other than Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore; just imagine a Gorkha soldier doing that; after all it requires some knowledge of that class and its basics," said Roy while Shankar, even more scathing, said that Ram Singh's claim was tantamount to "that man Goud once saying that he had married Priyanka Gandhi."

    Such remarks have, it appears, grieved the INA veteran deeply. A composer of repute, Ram Singh in fact holds a lifetime post as music consultant to Uttar Pradesh's Provincial Armed Constabulary, and is known to have composed the INA's immortal anthem, Kadam kadam badhaye ja; Khushi ke geet gaya ja.

    Lamenting "the level to which people could stoop," Ram Singh narrated to this correspondent the tale of how and when the Indian anthem had been composed. "It was sometime in 1943 in Rangoon, when Netaji called me over to say that a national anthem in Hindi was required for the provisional government of the Indian National Army. Jana gana mana was in Bengali, so Netaji, Abid Hasan and another person got together to translate it. Subsequently, it was given to me and I set it to music."

    Singh added that when though the Hindi version was what was first sung, four years later, in 1947, the Indian government subsequently decided to adopt the original Bengali version as the national anthem. "However," he added, "the tune I had composed was retained."

    Beaming with pride, he recalled how he had composed the tune in just one day. "Then Netaji told me to brush it up, so I got back to it and redid the whole tune, and the final version was ready about 12 days later."

    Asked specifically if he would like to react to the criticism of people like Roy and Shankar, Ram Singh said, "I think it is shameful that people can give such a parochial slant to something of national interest. I'd like to point out, too, that both the national anthem and the INA anthem which I composed are songs of soldiers. Gorkhas have in them what, in Hindi literature, we call Veer-Ras, and hence it is not so incredible that we Gorkhas can compose good music. In any event," added the evidently distressed soldier, "music is not, and can never be, the exclusive domain of any particular community, or the people of any particular region."
     
  12. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    It appears that, I was looking at only one side of the coin till now :tsk:

    It's clear now, thanks for the elucidations :peace:
     
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  13. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Let me tell you why the translation actually is incorrect. The items in red are gross misrepresentations, and I daresay, the article itself is malicious. The author of this song gave up Knighthood in protest against the massacre of civilians in Jallianwala Bagh.

    Now, I will post a few excerpts and what they mean:
    "Jano gano oikyo bidhaayako jayo he" - Victory to the one who unifies the people (certainly not the British).
    "Peerito murchhito deshey" - In the country where people are oppressed.
    "Daaruno biplabo maajhey" - In the middle of a great revolution.
    "Duhswapney aatankey, Rokkhaa koriley ankey, Snehamoyi tumi maataa" - In nightmares, and in terror, you the protector, you are the kind mother.

    There is one word that I believe causes the commotion - "Rajeshwaro," i.e., "raja" + "ishwar." This has been interpreted as the Emperor. It is not, if you read the entire song, not the truncated portion of the song that is the National Anthem.

    There is a reference to "The Charioteer," and some (including myself) believe that refers to Krishna, and hence, to make it non-religious, only the first stanza was picked.
     
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  14. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    People who write such BS articles even today should be tried under the "Prevention of Insults to National Honour Act, 1971", thrown in jail, and the keys sent to mars on the next Mars Mission.

    Bloody Naxalite/communist/maoist anarchist morons!
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2013
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  15. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Having said that, I still prefer "Vande Mataram" over Jana Gana Mana ! Vande Mataram has a soothing effect and I like it the most :D
     
  16. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    That is why it is the National Song.

     
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  17. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    I will submit that the main reason why Jana Gana Mana needs to be replaced is because it is incomprehensible to the vast majority (including me) of those who sing it year after year at Republic or Independence Day events etc. Every time I happen to sing this vaguely decipherable gibberish, I wonder what this word or that means and in some cases, though I understand most of the words in a stanza, what does the entire stanza itself mean?

    Instead of using highly Sanskritized Bengali (which I found was the case only after a previous discussion with some Bengali members of this forum-earlier, I believed JGM was in Sanskrit), maybe a Hindi rendition of the anthem can be used. At the very least this will serve the purpose of comprehension of what one is singing, though it may indeed cause some protest from the "chip on the shoulder" language-nationalist types like some of our esteemed Tamil brethren.
     
  18. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Good find.

    That Roy fellow who made that comment, "The anthem was set to tune by none other than Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore; just imagine a Gorkha soldier doing that; after all it requires some knowledge of that class and its basics," is a moron.
     
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  19. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    I agree that rendition in Hindi will make it easy to comprehend, you should know that this song is actually sung in regional languages as well.

    The fact is, if you read ancient common Bengali, it was very similar to Pali/Prakrit, or Maithili or Bhojpuri. The simple thing is, to make anything sound sacred, it was believed, in those parochial days, that Sanskritization was essential. Therefore, it was written, not in street-Bengali, but in Sanskritized Bengali.
     
  20. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Best is OP has long left India and adopted a foreign land.
     
  21. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    And is interested in philosophy so that he can attract "sloots." [sic.] :rofl:
     
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