Shipbuilding Industry in India

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by bengalraider, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Some good snippets of information here , the GOI should speed up the process of selecting the second line of submarines so that we do not have yards lying empty afetr 2012, also why are the OEM prices not yet finalized?


    SOURCES: Key Publishing Ltd Aviation Forums - View Single Post - Indian Navy News and Discussions

    FORCE - A Complete News Magazine on National Security - Defence Magazine
     
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  3. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    FORCE - A Complete News Magazine on National Security - Defence Magazine

    We Have Already Been Qualified and Cleared as the Second Line for Construction of Submarines at Hazira’

    Member of the Board and senior executive vice president, heavy engineering, Larsen & Toubro Limited, M.V. Kotwal
    [​IMG]

    What are L&T’s defence priorities?

    We have, over the last two decades, developed capabilities primarily through orders received from the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO); making prototypes for rocket-launchers, missile launchers, torpedo launchers and so on. Today, we have a wide range of capabilities covering weapon systems, sensors and engineering systems for all the three services. Our focus is on total system development including platforms. Having said this, we have done maximum work for the navy where we have been involved in a wide range of products — from manufacture of weapon systems and engineering systems, sonar handling systems, unique stabilised systems like WM-18 multi-barrelled rocket launchers, Dhanush vertical missile launchers, to construction of India’s first nuclear-powered submarine, ’Arihant’. The technologies that we have developed cover the requirement for the army and the air force as well. We have now set-up a new facility at Talegaon for producing weapon systems like multi-barrel rocket-launchers (eg Pinaka) for the Indian Army, torpedo launchers and rocket launchers for navy, which are in progress. The facility is also equipped for manufacture, assembly and integration of radars and other sensors. We have already manufactured radar systems, starting with the instrumentation radars for Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) followed by the military radar platforms — Rohini and Revathi, which we manufactured in partnership with BEL and LRDE (which was the nodal agency). We have partnered DRDO in development of multiple types of articulated and mobile bridge systems for the army and expect to produce them shortly. We have set-up a facility in Coimbatore for precision manufacture.

    All this is behind us now. We have ambitions to develop complete platforms for the navy, army and the air force. In case of the army, we have the capability and desire to participate in the manufacture of small arms and artillery guns (including self-propelled, mounted and towed variants). We are also keen to offer custom-engineered systems involving tracked and wheeled vehicles, suitably modified to carry weapon and missile systems, as well as bridging systems. Our established capabilities in defence electronics, communication and software at Mumbai, Talegaon and Bangalore, combined with domain knowledge of weapon systems place us in an ideal position to offer complete tactical communication, and network centric systems.

    Our aerospace capabilities began with ISRO with the satellite launch vehicles; we made contributions to Mission Chandrayaan by participating in manufacture of the launch vehicles as well as the C&S Band tracking radar and deep space network antenna systems. We have been involved in building some special systems like aluminium plate stretcher, angular motion simulators and hypersonic wind tunnel. We have established an advanced composites facility in Baroda for components and sub-assemblies for missiles and aircraft. From this facility we have been supplying components for Brahmos, ISRO and for HAL programmes.
    Recently, we have made a proposal to the government to form a joint venture with EADS, with whom we have chosen four segments: avionics, electronic warfare, mobile systems and radars. Mobile systems mean transportable bridge systems or command centres for military application. Once, the government clears this proposal, we intend going in a big way for both the domestic and global markets with state-of-the art technologies including setting up a centre of excellence for new product and technology development. So, when you ask about our priorities for the Indian defence services, we are confident of making significant contributions by building ships, submarines, guns and specialised vehicles apart from the several other areas described above.

    Was the JV proposal with EADS made before the revised DPP 2009 guidelines recently announced by the defence minister?

    The proposal to form a JV with EADS has been made before announcement of revised DPP 2009. It complies with the announced policy of the government with regard to FDI and with the recent press notes on the subject and enables us to offer equipment and systems in the areas mentioned above not only to serve domestic requirements but also for the global market. The DPP in its latest version deals with the ‘Buy and Make-Indian’ category where a DPSU or a private company can be a lead bidder and have a tie-up with a foreign company for transfer of technology. The DPP works on a case to case basis, whereas our proposal in the JV is for a long-term partnership. As far as we are concerned, a JV is a long term initiative with commitment to co-develop and co-produce, and is not to be restricted in its scope just for a specific product or for a single country. Both partner companies in a JV should have something to gain in global business. As for us, through this JV we will be part of the EADS global supply chain.

    Will you be manufacturing things for EADS under this JV?

    There will be two modes for functioning of the proposed JV: In the first part, production will be based on certain technologies which EADS will bring in whereas L&T will add some technologies developed in-house. In the other part, the two companies will develop certain next generation technologies together.



    I Will post the full interview later on in the week.
     
  4. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    ‘Infrastructure at PSL Has Been Designed for Steel Fabrication of Approx 1,44,000 Tons
    PerAnnum’
    Executive director Pipavav Shipyard Ltd,
    Rear Admiral R.M. Bhatia
    http://www.forceindia.net/coverstory9.aspx

    [​IMG]


    What kind of infrastructure and capacity exists at the PSL? What are the expansion plans till 2020?

    Pipavav Shipyard Ltd is being developed as a modern shipyard of international standards at Pipavav in Gujarat. The aim is to create an excellent infrastructure to meet the global shipbuilding standards for commercial ships as well as for the Naval ships & submarines.

    Infrastructure at PSL has been designed for steel fabrication of approx. 1,44,000 tons per annum. To achieve such high volumes of production, the yard has been equipped with state of the art CNC machines for cutting, welding, bending and other shipbuilding related activities. The shipyard has the largest dry dock (662m long and 65m wide) in India. Dry dock is serviced by two large Goliath cranes, 600 tons each. The cranes have span of 148m which is one of the largest spans for the Goliath cranes in the world. The Yard is spread over an area of 782 acres consisting of 210 acres of fully developed waterfront area, 250 acres of Block Making Site and 322 acres of land earmarked for future expansion. Total covered area for fabrication activities is 169,090 Sqm.

    In addition to the above, the yard has dedicated environment controlled Blast and paint cells, modern outfit bays and a dedicated Corridor for shifting of pre-outfitted blocks upto 350 tons each.
     
  5. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    The GOI needs to energise the warship building sector in india , many indian yards already have MOU'S with global shipbuilders like THALES (Mazagon docks ) and Fincianteri(CSL) , we need to encourage foreign investment into shipbuilding in india, if the GOI offers the same type of incentives as the Koreans, we could see Hyundia and Daewoo bringing their business and expertise here. if we level the playing field by offering subsidies we have a lot to gain.
    The IN has always pioneered indigenous systems, now this investment can be used to get a lot of money(as the article says the design of the QE class cost more than a billion dollars). We can start with offering design services to IOR allies like mauritius and sri lanka and build up our reputation from there.
     
  6. Energon

    Energon DFI stars Stars and Ambassadors

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    Given the massive backup with its own ship deliveries (merchant and military) I doubt India is going to be the "global hub" of ship building anytime soon. At least based on my discussions with multiple marine engineers who either work or have worked at MDL the supposed capacity being fed to the media is overly exaggerated. None of India's ship building facilities actually operate at their true potential and collectively they are unable to suffice the local needs (which is pretty much the case with any state dominated sector).

    There are of course efforts to change this. Massive investments are being made into buying technology and even the sector is being liberalized (up to a certain extent); the overall pace of India's ship building capacity is nonetheless still pretty slow. This is an industry that takes decades to develop, and India despite having all the precursors hasn't managed to get its act together (again, the standard Indian tale).
     
  7. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    The author makes a good point about the decline of Russian shipbuilding , however i feel that has happened because of the lack of capital for the industry in the 90's and the industry may recover soon(if the Russian government prods it along). one more factor has been the migration of submarine and ship designers and engineers to foreign nations lured by the prospects of better pay and benefits(reportedly some are even in India helping us with the ATV and ADS projects).
     
  8. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Printed from

    On national security interests, Govt moves Hindustan Shipyard to Defence ministry

    PTI 24 December 2009, 02:29pm IST

    NEW DELHI: The government transferred state-owned Hindustan Shipyard Ltd from the Shipping to the Defence Ministry to meet the country's security needs.

    Sources said the move is aimed at creating capabilities for the Navy to indigenously construct nuclear submarines.

    The Cabinet also approved the setting up of a new shipyard of international standard.

    "The government has approved transfer of Hindustan Shipyard Ltd (HSL), Visakhapatnam, to Ministry of Defence for meeting the national security requirements of building strategic vessels for Indian Navy," Information and Broadcasting Minister Ambika Soni said.

    Briefing the media about the decisions, she said "For meeting the merchant shipping requirements of ship-building and ship repair, government has given 'in principle' approval to Ministry of Shipping for setting up of a new shipyard of international standard."

    The location of the new shipyard is yet to be finalised. The Shipping Ministry had sent a note to the Cabinet for the transfer of HSL after valuing the company at a little over Rs 1,000 crore and finalising the transfer modalities.

    HSL has built around 150 ships and repaired over 1,800 so far and undertaken repair works for the Navy. Sources said it will be critical to the Navy's plan to induct a fleet of nuclear submarines in the coming years.

    "The shipyard has work orders worth Rs 2,000 crore now, which are likely to be completed by March 2011," a top HSL official said.

    On national security interests, Govt moves Hindustan Shipyard to Defence ministry - India - The Times of India
     
  9. A chauhan

    A chauhan "अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l" Senior Member

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    Navy to launch latest stealth destroyer INS Kochi news
    17 September 2009



    INS Kochi, the second of the three Project 15-A Kolkota class stealth destroyers will be launched on 18 September 2009. The 6800 ton ship, designed by the Directorate of Naval Design, is being built in Mumbai at the Mazagon Docks.

    Of indigenous design, the Kolkota class are a follow-on, stealth version of the existing Project 15 Delhi class destroyers – INS Delhi, INS Mysore and INS Mumbai. The Kolkata class guided missile destroyer will be the latest stealth destroyer with land attack capability being built for the Indian Navy.

    The first vessel, INS Kolkota is expected to join the fleet in 2010, followed by INS Kochi in 2011 and the third, as yet unnamed, in May 2012.

    Four more vessels are planned under Project 15-B, with updated stealth features.The keel of INS Kochi was laid on 25 October 2005.

    Of indigenous design, 90 per cent of a Project 15-A ship is constructed through the use of local material and equipment. At per unit cost of Rs3,800 crore, the three Project 15-A Kolkata-class destroyers will cost the navy approximately Rs11,000 crore ($950 million), including the cost of long-term spare parts.

    domain-b.com : Navy to launch latest stealth destroyer INS Kochi
     
  10. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    I am skeptical of the need to build a huge surface fleet. A large submarine fleet instead will give us larger reach, striking capability and better odds against enemy warships. Our current submarine 'fleet' is in decrepit condition-one wonders how long the IN can hold out against a submarine assault by the PLAN.
     
  11. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    The Russian NAVY & PLAN both rely on submarines to project power more than surface ships simply because of the naval policy of "sea denial" they follow. neither of these two navies ever had the fianacial muscle to engage in "Supercarrier diplomacy"(a modern form of gunboat diplomacy).A Sea denial strategy is usually followed by a navy that relies more on the psychological fear thata hidden submarine threat implies rather than the visible presence of a large no of surface warships, however a submarine fleet is pretty much useless in the time of peace having no visible impact on sealane security. the IN instead follows the British and American pattern of sea control wherein we use carriers and surface ships to foster naval diplomacy and protect sea lanes, though i agree we need to spped up submarine construction i feel we should still remain a top heavy force that follows the sea control strategem .As for china , China has 66 submarines as of sinodefence.com out of these 8 are nuclear out of which only 4 are of the relatively modern jin and shang class out of the 58 boats of the chinese SSK fleet 26 boats are obsolete craft of the ming and romeo class also out of the 16 boats of the newer song class at leat 50% are older hullsm that are on their way to retirement, however we are still far behind and the next line of submarines does need to be opened urgently.
     
  12. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    And we do? We're financially weaker than both of them. Building a large surface fleet may be good for show, and for international diplomacy, but a large submarine fleet, IMO, would be more potent in time of war. The German U-boats during WWII were famous for sinking record numbers of Allied battleships, while being hard to kill themselves.

    The British love of battleships is may have something to do with the fact that the British have used them to rule the seas for 5 centuries-before the advent of submarines, that is. The US followed in the footsteps of Britain, and they have the same mindset towards naval warfare. But both of them can afford to spend billions on building and maintaining a huge surface fleet, as well as significant ASW capabilities.

    In times of war, a relatively small number (7-8) of advanced PLAN submarines could loiter in the Bay of Bengal, putting the entire surface fleet of the IN under threat. IMO, if the IN is unable to locate and destroy PLAN submarines, the entire fleet will possibly remain at the docks, as happened with the Argentine Navy during the Falklands war.

    I don't think the IN ASW capabilities are world class......though against Pakistani subs, we might be more than able to hold our own, but against a larger foe.......
     
  13. Suryakiran

    Suryakiran Regular Member

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  14. Ritwik

    Ritwik Regular Member

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    India is investing heavily in ASW capabilities by building new corvettes and frigates and buying the P8I poseidon.
     
  15. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    no offence.

    it will cost india one decade at least and billions of dollars even to work out one key component of shipbuilding, supersized watercraft crakshafts,let alone other key components.

    India would have to study hundreds of such key techs ,before India really were to become a "hub of global shipbuilding"

    so, pls don't underestimate the difficulty when you draw optimistic conclusion so easily..
     
  16. wild goose

    wild goose Regular Member

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    Mates,

    I have read some where that the German shipbuiding giant HDW (Howaldtswerke Deutsche Werft AG) is selling its shares because of financial crunch. Will it be a good move if the GoI purchase those.


    http://turkishnavy.blogspot.com/2009/12/thyssenkrupp-is-selling-hdw-as-well.html


    In case of second line submarines of Indian Navy, we can start building the boats from there till our new shipyard is ready. And also if we can send some of our engineers and technicians to work in a state of the art shipbuilding yard like HDW, we can also avoid the delays caused by problems in absorbing new technology (like the case of scorpene) for the future.

    And their Type 214 / 212 submarines are superb machines. And experience in handling high end machinaries in the field of shipbuilding will definitely help in making India a global hub if we are serious about it.

    regards,
     
  17. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    I believe the article said "global hub of warship building" which is quite a bit harder than being a civilan hub. The economic climate isn't going to be very good for civilian shipbuilding in the next few years so better to focus on more profitable warships which orders are on the rise.
     
  18. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Definetly not... read this for why.

    Pain Awaits South Korean Shipbuilders - WSJ.com
     
  19. wild goose

    wild goose Regular Member

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  20. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Seoul Frets Over Shipyards
    Early Plans to Address Plunging Orders Unlikely to Avoid Job Losses and Other Distress

    By EVAN RAMSTAD

    SEOUL—Policy makers on Monday proposed steps to address a plunge in ship orders this year in South Korea, home to seven of the world's 10 largest shipbuilders.

    But there is little chance the industry here will avoid steep job losses and financial difficulties in coming years.

    View Full Image
    SHIPS
    Bloomberg News

    An employee worked on a new ship in April at the Hyundai Heavy Industries shipyard in Ulsan, South Korea.
    SHIPS
    SHIPS

    Even after the global downturn began last year, global shipbuilders continued at full throttle, banging out and welding hundreds of vessels ordered from 2005 to 2007, the biggest years for ship orders ever.

    But ship orders through last month were well off last year's pace, meaning that activity in shipyards will start declining next year and slide sharply in 2011 and 2012.

    This delayed effect will hit shipbuilding particularly hard in South Korea, where the industry is responsible for about 10% of the country's exports by value.

    Shipbuilders have responded in part by building offshore platforms for energy

    View Full Image
    SHIPS
    SHIPS
    SHIPS

    companies.

    And on Monday, South Korea's commerce ministry presented President Lee Myung-bak with a blueprint for dealing with the potential crisis. The early-stage plan includes restructuring the most troubled small and midsize companies and providing subsidies to encourage shipbuilders to enter new businesses, such as building offshore power-generating wind farms.

    It could be months before the government moves forward on any proposals, however.

    And industry executives and consultants say only a stunningly large rebound in orders next year can prevent a steep drop in activity at shipyards in the years that follow.

    Such a rebound is unlikely because shipping companies are suffering from a 12% drop in global trade from last year. Some have been forced to transport goods below cost. They have also parked ships in ports world-wide.

    Analysts say it will take years for shipping companies to absorb the orders for new vessels that were made a few years ago and are being completed at shipyards.

    "All through this year, shipowners have been struggling because of the economic situation and shortage of trade," says Ki Won-kang, senior executive vice president of Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., in Geoje, South Korea.

    "As a consequence, the shipbuilding industry is suffering. I don't know when this market will pick up."

    Through November this year, world-wide orders for new ships amounted to 6.5 million compensated gross tonnage, a measure of vessel size, according to Clarksons PLC, a London-based shipping brokerage and consulting firm. That is sharply below the 46.9 million CGT in vessels ordered for all of last year and 89.7 million CGT in vessels ordered in 2007, the biggest year for ship orders in history.

    Amid the plunge, China's shipbuilders surged ahead of South Korea's in new orders, though figures from both countries are far below last year's levels. In the past few weeks, Korean shipbuilders announced a handful of big deals and its manufacturers may yet finish the year with the lead.

    Daewoo Shipbuilding, the world's third-largest shipbuilder by revenue and tonnage, after Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. and Samsung Heavy Industries Co., on Friday said it had received an order valued at $1.1 billion to build two oil-drilling ships in 2012. Earlier this month, Samsung announced an order to build a $1.1 billion cruise ship designed to be a floating luxury residence. It was Samsung's first ship order of the year. A year ago, Samsung and Daewoo Shipbuilding executives said they would aim for $10 billion in orders this year.

    But shipbuilders are scoring far more deals to build offshore oil and gas platforms than contracts for vessels. The platform business typically had provided only about 20% of revenue for shipbuilding companies but could grow to 40%–50% in coming years, analysts say.

    "The big scramble right now is for these offshore projects," says Peter Bartholomew, a broker and long-time industry consultant in Seoul who is working on deals for five platforms.

    Some investors and shipbuilders also are looking at building offshore platforms that hold windmills that would generate electricity, a potential new business. Several shipbuilders in recent months announced small projects to build wind turbines on land.

    Even so, big job losses are nearly certain over the next few years in shipyards world-wide. Hanjin Heavy Industries and Construction Co., a South Korean company that employs 2,500 people at big shipyards in South Korea and the Philippines, this month announced it was starting an early-retirement program.

    Larger companies that rely heavily on subcontractors for a portion of their work force are likely to whittle down those contracts next year. "Slowly we will reduce our dependence on outside contractors," says Daewoo Shipbuilding's Mr. Ki. "That's the only thing we can do for the time being."
    —Jaeyeon Woo contributed to this article.

    Write to Evan Ramstad at [email protected]
     
  21. shameem007

    shameem007 New Member

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    I am skeptical of the need to build a huge surface fleet. A large submarine fleet instead will give us larger reach, striking capability and better odds against enemy warships. Our current submarine 'fleet' is in decrepit condition-one wonders how long the IN can hold out against a submarine assault by the PLAN.
     

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