Russia-Israel embark Defense Cooperation

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by bhramos, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Russia, Israel sign military cooperation deal

    Russia and Israel signed a framework military cooperation deal on Monday that Russia's defense chief suggested would lead to further purchases of Israeli weapons and technology.

    "We have just signed a long-term agreement on military cooperation," Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said after meeting with his Israeli counterpart Ehud Barak. He said they discussed both military and weapons cooperation.

    "It's very important to us that in the transition to a new image, the Russian armed forces use the experience the Israeli armed forces have and the work they has done," Serdyukov said, according to the Defense Ministry press service.

    The ministry did not reveal details of the agreement, which was the latest sign of tightening ties between the nations. Russia has drawn closer to Israel since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, a supporter of Arab nations in the Middle East.

    Russia, which is beginning to buy foreign arms as it struggles to improve its rusty military, has sought to build up a fleet of Israeli-made spy drones since Georgia used such Israeli aircraft against Russia in their brief 2008 war.

    Serdyukov said Russia has bought 12 of the pilotless aircraft and is training 50 servicemen to operate them.

    Israel has pressed Russia not to sell weapons to its foes such as Syria and Iran. Moscow pleased Israel by promising not to deliver S-300 anti-aircraft missiles to Iran while new UN sanctions over its nuclear program are in place.



    "Russia is a central power in the world, and a very dominant and influential force in the Middle East," Barak told Serdyukov, according to a statement from Barak's office.

    It said he outlined Israel's main security concerns, "foremost the Iranian threat and Syria's armament along with its support for terror organizations and Hezbollah".

    Russia, Israel sign military cooperation deal - Israel News, Ynetnews
     
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  3. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Israel and Russia have signed today a military cooperation agreement and are negotiating the establishment of a joint venture to develop and produce unmanned aerial vehicles in Russia.

    Israel’s minister of defense Ehud Barak and his host, Russian minister of defense, Anatoly Serdyukov have signed a military cooperation agreement today, paving the way for tighter cooperation in the field of unmanned systems, counter terrorism and asymmetric, urban warfare – fields Russia expects a dialog with Israel could be beneficial.

    “It is very important to us that in the transition to a new image, the Russian armed forces use the experience the Israeli armed forces have and the work they have done” Serdyukov said, adding Russia has bought 12 UAV systems from Israel, and 50 servicemen are currently being trained to operate them. Gradually opening to the world defense market, Russia is planning several acquisitions of major platforms, including helicopter carriers, and Italian armored vehicles. Past cooperation with foreign defense industries were limited to contracts where customers insisted on the integration of non Russian avionics or weaponry. The acquisition of Israeli UAVs was one of the first procurements foreign systems completed by the Russians.

    The twelve UAVs Russia has acquired were delivered by IAI off-the-shelf, to fulfill ad-hoc requirements for military and homeland security uses. Among the off-the-shelf available systems were two Bird Eye 400 systems, eight I-View MK150 tactical UAVs and two Searcher Mk II tactical short range UAVs. Some 50 Russian military servicemen are currently undergoing training in the use of these systems.

    A second contract worth $100 million is expected to be delivered this year. The Russians were also after more advanced UAVs of the Heron 1 class, but after long deliberation Israel’s defense ministry decided to exclude such advanced systems as ‘too sensitive’ for transfer to the eastern bloc.

    However, to enable the deal to go forward the MOD approved IAI to proceed and establish a Joint Venture with a Russian partner, to establish a UAV development and production center in Russia. Prospects for the Russian demand for such systems are estimated at $300 million. According to various estimates, the Russian military needs up to 100 UAVs and at least 10 guidance and control systems to ensure effective battlefield reconnaissance.

    Despite the warming relations with the country once known to be its enemies largest arms provider, Israel is concerned of Moscow’s determination to pursue arms transfer plans to Syria, particularly of the Yakhont P-800 supersonic anti-ship missiles which keep Israeli naval vessels at risk throughout the eastern Mediterranean.

    Israel is particularly concerned about a possible transfer of such weapons from Syria to Lebanon’s Hezbollah. Another issue is the transfer of S-300 air defense missiles to Iran, which has been dragged for years. Moscow has never clarified its position regarding the fulfillment of the contract signed with the Iranians.

    The issue of missiles transfer to Syria was dealt with Moscow on discrete channels for some time but has raised opposition in the Kremlin, as many officials refused to back off from the commitment to its Syria ally. In the past Russia denied Israel’s claims of the use of Syrian-supplied Russian made missiles by Hezbollah, during the 2nd Lebanon War in 2006. However, since that war Russian defense manufacturers continuously refer to the successful combat use of their Kornet and Metis guided missiles, without openly mentioning Hezbollah as the ‘end user’.

    Two weeks ago Israel’s prime minister raised this issue with Russian prime-minister Vladimir Putin and today. This topic was also include din today’s meeting between Putin and Barak. The P-800 missiles have a range of 300 kilometers, carry a 200-kilogram warhead and feature a unique ability to cruise several meters above the surface, making it difficult to detected and intercept it.

    Source


    I must say Russia has gone under changes in Weapons procurement due to whatever reasons. But there are two key countries whose reaction will be interesting to see. US reaction on Israel & Iran's view on Russia... :happy_2:
     
  4. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  5. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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  6. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Russia, Israel mull laser technology deal

    Russia, Israel mull laser technology deal
     
  7. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Israel, Russia in Laser Tech, Drone Deal

    First, Israel will beef up Russia’s robotic air force. Down the road, perhaps, Vladimir Putin may return the favor, by equipping Israeli drones with Russian laser tech.

    On Monday, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak and his Russian counterpart, Anatoly Serdyukov, signed a first-of-its kind military agreement between the two countries. It’s the latest step towards cooperation for two countries that have traditionally been at each other’s throats.

    In 2009, Moscow bought a dozen Israeli unmanned aerial vehicles — two Bird Eye 400 systems, eight I-View MK150 tactical UAVs and two Searcher Mk II tactical short range UAVs, according to the well-connected Defense Update. That was after Georgia relied on Israeli spy drones during the South Ossetia War.


    Now, Russian officials say, Jerusalem and Moscow have agreed to a second, $100 million deal for another 36 drones. Delivery is slated for later in the year. A joint venture to cooperate on UAV production, worth an estimated $300 million, hasn’t been hammered out, yet. But both sides seem eager. Russian boss-for-life Vlad Putin says Russia is even “considering the possibility of equipping Israeli aircraft with our devices – space technology and laser technology,” the premier said.

    I’m pretty sure Pooty-poo means laser range finders, not blasters. But it is worth noting that the Russian military seems to be showing interest in rekindling its long-dormant energy weapons program. Reports out of Moscow “suggest that Russia has re-started work on a Cold War project intended to produce a laser cannon mounted on an enormous military transport aircraft,” The Register’s Lew Page notes. The most likely application for the ray gun: blinding enemy satellites.


    Israel, Russia in Laser Tech, Drone Deal
     
  8. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Israel threatens to scrap UAV deal with Russia over Syria arms sale

    Israel may tear up much of the unprecedented military cooperation deal it signed with Moscow at the start of this month due to anger over Moscow's rigid stance on supplying naval missiles to Israel's enemy Syria.


    "We will have to reconsider all proposed deals with Russia. Moscow did not show the necessary understanding of our requests," a senior Israeli defense source quoted on aviation business magazine Flight International's website said on Thursday.

    Earlier this week, Moscow confirmed it would supply P-800 Yakhont supersonic naval cruise missiles to Syria, despite vociferous Israeli objections to the deal which was signed in 2007.

    The first victim of the fallout could be Russia and Israel's planned $300 million deal to set up an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) manufacturing facility in Russia.

    Russia has spent around $50 million on Israeli-built UAVs this year to train operators and develop tactics for using modern systems.

    It has also expressed interest in buying more Israeli UAV systems, including the IAI Heron.

    The Russian forces have previously expressed dissatisfaction with locally manufactured UAVs.
     
  9. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    :emot15: Both parties internally are not interested in moving forward the deal then why sign it in first place??

    Russia could make aerial drones without Israeli help claims company

    Russia does not need Israeli assistance to make progress in the development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), including military drones, the head of a Russian UAV production company said on Thursday.

    A senior Israeli defense source quoted in Flight International said earlier that Israel may tear up much of the unprecedented military cooperation deal it signed with Russia at the start of this month due to anger over Moscow's decision to supply Yakhont naval missiles to Syria.

    "In the next two or three years, there will be a breakthrough in the Russian UAV market regardless of the Israeli position on this issue," Vladimir Verba, the director general of the Vega company.

    Verba said his company had developed a comprehensive UAV development program until 2025, which had been approved by the majority of its customers, including the Federal Security Service (FSB) and the Interior Ministry.

    He also said Vega had been developing strike and reconnaissance drones for the Russian military in cooperation with Russia's United Aircraft Corporation (UAC).

    The Russian military stressed the need to provide the Armed Forces with advanced reconnaissance systems in the wake of a brief military conflict with Georgia in August 2008, when the effectiveness of Russian military operations was severely hampered by the lack of reliable intelligence.

    According to various estimates, the Russian military needs up to 100 UAVs and at least 10 guidance and control systems to ensure effective battlefield reconnaissance.

    The Russian Defense Ministry has previously expressed dissatisfaction with locally manufactured UAVs, and decided to buy them from Israel.

    According to the ministry, some 50 Russian military servicemen are undergoing training in the use of Israeli-built UAVs and that a total of twelve have been bought.

    Russia has reportedly signed two UAV contracts with Israel. Under the first contract, signed in April 2009, Israel delivered two Bird Eye 400 systems (worth $4 million), eight I View MK150 tactical UAVs ($37 million) and two Searcher Mk II multi-mission UAVs ($12 million).

    The second contract was for the purchase of 36 UAVs, worth a total of $100 million, to be delivered later this year.

    Russia and Israel have also been negotiating the establishment of a joint $300-million venture to produce UAVs.
     
  10. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    I dont think anyones denying Russia couldn't make a go of it alone, just that it would cost alot more and have many more mistakes than partnering with Israel.
     
  11. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia always need partners to finance its project. Be it India, China or Israel. They have been clever enough to make others finance their project.
     

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