Royal Australian AirForce Takes Part In US-Led Multinational Exercise Red Flag-Alaska

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Royal Australian Air Force fighter jets arrive in Alaska for Exercise Red Flag
    11 JULY 2011

    Participants: Australia, Japan, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States

    Royal Australian Air Force fighter jets and personnel today began the most advanced international air combat training activity, Exercise Red Flag.

    Red Flag in Alaska is a United States Pacific Air Forces Command led large force employment exercise designed to replicate a high-end combat environment. The two-week long exercise is based at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.

    Up to seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW will participate in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska until 22 July.

    Commanding Officer No 3 Squadron, Wing Commander Terry van Haren, said Exercise Red Flag involves a series of air combat scenarios that test operational air and ground crews to the highest level.

    “Red Flag is one of the largest exercises Australia will participate in this year,” Wing Commander van Haren said.

    “It provides a realistic combat environment in which our Air Force personnel can showcase their extraordinary abilities in a coalition scenario.

    “Regular participation in the Red Flag exercise series is a major contributor to Australia’s high standard of air combat capability.”

    Aircrew will be exposed to large force employment on a scale not possible in Australia, when they perform counter air, precision strike and offensive air support in packages of up to 100 aircraft.

    “Red Flag also provides invaluable training for our logistics, support and maintenance personnel as they are able to practice deploying to another country and working together with other Air Forces,” Wing Commander van Haren said.

    The coalition exercise will see participants from Australia, Japan, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States working together in one of the largest activities the RAAF will be involved in this year.

    Strategic air lift and logistic support will be provided by a C-130J Hercules from 37 Squadron at RAAF Richmond. This is the first time a J model has participated in the Red Flag exercise series and the aircraft will operate from Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska during the exercise.

    Joint Terminal Attack Controllers will also participate in the field training exercise phase of Red Flag Alaska.

    Red Flag is a large-forces exercise conducted in interior Alaska to simulate air combat. Aircrews will be operating in the 67,000 square-mile Joint Alaska Pacific Range Complex, which offers adequate space and ranges for crews to simulate full-scale aerial battles.

    Australia last participated in Red Flag Alaska in 2008 and has participated in the exercise series since 1980.



    Source: Australian Department of Defence
     
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  3. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Since they don't involve themselves in any wars at all (unilateral) it is important that their pilots keep their skills brushed via such exercises. Aussies are lucky they don't have to waste billions in military deployments and having the headache of having a nuclear armed terrorist nation right around their border.
     
  4. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    They're even luckier to have the US for an ally.
     
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 51st Pacific Air Force based out of Osan in Korea, takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The 51st are playing the friendly force during the air combat training exercise.
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    A Republic of Singapore Air force F-15SG, based out of Shaw Air Base Idaho, roars into the air on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The 51st are playing the "Good Guys" during the air combat training exercise.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
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    An F-16C from the United States 354th Aggressor Squadron takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The aggressors are playing adversary force during the air combat training activity.
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    An U.S. Air Force Osan Korea based A-10 Thunderbolt from the 51st Pacific Air Force begins its take-off run during the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2 from Eielson Air Force Base Alaska.
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  6. indian_sukhoi

    indian_sukhoi Regular Member

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    The Article doesnt reveal much about the RAAF Aircrafts which are participating in the Exercise!!!

    Except some F-18s with C-130Js for logistic support,......There is no sign of their new Refuelling Aircrafts. RAAF recently Inducted Airbus Refuelling Aircrafts into their Inventory. Would be very much usefull for their traveling to Alaska.
     
  7. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the United States 354th Aggressor Squadron takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The aggressors are playing the adversary force during the air combat training exercise.
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    A Republic of Singapore Air force F-15SG, based out of Shaw Air Base Idaho, roars into the air on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
    [​IMG]


    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, taxis out for the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, taxis out for the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, taxis out for the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
    [​IMG]


    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the 177th Fighter Wing in Atlantic City New Jersey, takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2.
    [​IMG]


    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the United States 354th Aggressor Squadron takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The aggressors are playing the adversary force during the air combat training activity.
    [​IMG]


    An U.S. Air Force F-16C from the United States 354th Aggressor Squadron takes off on the first mission for Exercise Red Flag Alaska 11-2. The aggressors are playing the adversary force during the air combat training exercise.
    [​IMG]


    Members from the Japan Self Defence Force have a look at a Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18 Hornet from No. 3 Squadron at Eielson Air Force Base Alaska in the lead-up to Exercise Red Flag 2011.
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    Members from the Japan Self Defence Force pose for a group photo in front of a Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18 Hornet from No. 3 Squadron after a visit to the Squadron lines in the lead-up to Exercise Red Flag 2011.
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    No. 3 Squadron Aircraft Technicians wait beside the F/A-18 Hornets as they prepare to taxi out for a familiarisation flight at Eielson Air Force Base Alaska for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
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    Aircraft Technicians from No.3 Squadron look for Foreign Objects on the flight line before the next wave of F/A-18s depart Eielson Air Force Alaska for a mission. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
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    A Pilot from No. 3 Squadron, climbs aboard an F/A-18 Hornet for a familiarisation flight from Eielson Air Force Base Alaska for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
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    A trio of F/A-18 Hornets from No. 3 Squadron fly along side the Omega air-to-air refuelling tanker en-route from Australia to Alaska for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
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    A formation of No. 3 Squadron Hornets soar high above the Sierra Nevada's on their way to Eielson Air Force Base Alaska for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
    [​IMG]


    A swarm of F/A-18 Hornets from No. 3 Squadron fly along side the Omega air-to-air refuelling tanker en-route to Alaska from Australia for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July. The fighter jets will operate from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, to participate in the most advanced international air combat training activity, Exercise Red Flag. Red Flag is a United States Pacific Air Forces Command led large force employment exercise designed to replicate a high-end combat environment.
    [​IMG]


    A swarm of F/A-18 Hornets from No. 3 Squadron fly along side the Omega air-to-air refuelling tanker en-route to Alaska from Australia for Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July.
    [​IMG]


    An F/A-18 Hornet from No. 3 Squadron on the flightline at Eielson Air Force Base Alaska during Exercise Red Flag. Seven F/A-18 Hornets from RAAF Williamtown’s No 3 Squadron in NSW are participating in world-class air combat training in the skies above Alaska from 11 until 22 July. The fighter jets will operate from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, to participate in the most advanced international air combat training activity, Exercise Red Flag.
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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2011
    asianobserve likes this.
  8. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Two Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18 Hornets launch side-by-side from the runway during RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 July 11, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A, a two week long exercise, focuses on aerial combat training for U.S. and allied forces and is conducted within the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, a 67,000 square mile training range.
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    An U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II taxis past the air traffic control tower during RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 July 11, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A, a two week long exercise, focuses on aerial combat training for U.S. and allied forces and is conducted within the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, a 67,000 square mile training range. The A-10 is assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon is prepared for shutdown after completing a familiarization flight July 6, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-16 is assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron, Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The 36th FS is participating in RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2, a two week long exercise providing aircrew realistic combat sorties, increasing their chances of survival in combat.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon taxis to the runway as another U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon Aggressor launches during RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 July 11, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A allows participating units to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures as well as improve interoperability.
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    A Japan Air Self Defense Force E-3 Sentry Airborne Warning and Control System aircraft soars over Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, July 6, 2011. The JASDF is participating in RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2, a two week long exercise providing aircrew realistic combat sorties, increasing their chances of survival in combat.
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    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  9. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON (JBER) Airmen support Red Flag-Alaska international partnership
    UNITED STATES - 14 JULY 2011

    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska -- The multinational exercise, Red Flag-Alaska, kicked off Monday at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Along with U.S. Air Force personnel, the event includes units from Thailand, Australia, Singapore, and Japan. The exercise is scheduled to conclude July 22.

    Red Flag is a collection of exercises used to practice large force employment, global strike, defensive counter air, close air support, tactical airlift and combat search and rescue operations in an international partnership.

    Red Flag will test crews from a number of different aircraft in the exercise; 353d Combat Squadron Detachment 1, located at JBER, staged seven C-130's, three Japanese Self Defense Force airborne 767's (two for refueling and one airborne warning and control system), and a 962nd Airborne Air Control Squadron, E-3 sentry AWACS platform.
    Red Flag pushes airmen from all over the world using different systems, speaking different languages and relying on different habits to perform and utilize each others' capabilities.

    Eielson Air Force Base is the home station of the 353d CTS, which leads the exercise. Det 1 will play a vital role in the execution of the simulation according to Red Flag-Alaska's website.

    In order to effectively simulate the battle field for this exercise, vast land is essential.

    Alaska provides with its abundance of nearly 67,000 square miles of training airspace.
    Det. 1 provides a number of unique capabilities as well. One of which is the ample space available which allows the planning of larger more complex exercise scenarios.

    The need for "efficient interoperability" is what Squadron Leader Maj. Steven Ferguson, of the Royal Australian Air Force's 37 Squadron referred to as one of the external challenges of working in any exercise of this spectrum.

    "On this scale, this is the biggest (exercise) that we'll do," Ferguson said. "We exercise in Asia, Australia and some other places, but in terms of the number of aircraft and the number of people involved, it's the biggest."

    The Royal Australian Air Force sent 33 air crew members for the exercise and this will be the first time they will test the capabilities of their C-130J model Hercules cargo planes in this kind of environment, Ferguson said.

    "(We want to) get our foot into that door working on the radar range in the Red Flag-Alaska environment," Ferguson said.

    "What we're doing here this time is the first step in that direction," Ferguson said, as they look to continue to improve the C-130J model along with the skills of their crew.

    "We're working out of (JBER) in an airlift package," he said.

    By closely working and having open dialogue with the other crews that are participating in the exercise they are rapidly learning the Red Flag format.

    "The best thing we'll get from this is experience for our younger folks," Ferguson said.
    Experience Ferguson expects they will be able to take back to Australia and disseminate to the rest of the unit.

    Though the JBER airfield will see an increase in traffic during Red Flag, Tech. Sgt. Monty Crawford of the 3rd Operations Support Squadron, Airfield Maintenance deputy airfield manager said, other than an increase in flight plans, there will be little effect on the way they do business.

    The participants and their airframes have been at JBER since the end of June.
    The majority of the background work such as setting up offices, lodging logistics and getting familiar with the area was done in the interim.

    The Airmen of Det. 1 who work in the maintenance shop act as liaisons to assist temporary duty units with lodging, shipping and maintenance requests.

    The team does what is necessary to help the participants transition to working here on JBER and heading back to their home station go as smoothly as possible, said U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Mike Black, the Exercise Support Officer in Charge for Det. 1.

    The largest challenge the shop had with making the recent transition of TDY personnel to the base seamless was with two exercises being back to back.

    Black mentioned when Northern Edge ended June 24, they had items still processing to leave JBER as they were beginning to receive items for this installment of Red Flag.

    The conclusion of Red Flag Alaska 11-2 does not mark the end of this year's scheduled training. There are two more Red Flag exercises this calendar year, Aug. 11-26 and Oct. 6-21.



    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska -- Japanese Air Self-Defense Force C-130 Hercules crews walk to their aircraft in preparation for another day of flights in support of the multinational training exercise, Red Flag 11-2, hosted at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson and Eielson Air Force Base. The exercise concludes July 22.
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    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska -- Japanese Air Self-Defense Force air crew position a pallet which will later be paracute dropped during mission during a multinational training exercise, Red Flag 11-2.
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    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska -- Japanese Air Self-Defense Force airmen give directions to forklift driver during loading of a cargo of pallets to be parachute dropped later in the day as part of a multinational training exercise, Red Flag 11-2.
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  10. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Executive Observer Programme members arrive at Eielson U.S. Air Force Base, Alaska in three United States Army Blackhawk helicopters.

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  11. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) trains on top of the world
    27 JULY 2011

    EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- The Royal Australian Air Force and a small contingent of the Australian Army returned to Eielson Air Force Base and Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 to participate in upgrade training and interact with U.S. and allied forces.

    Branches of the Australian Defence Force have participated in RF-A before and have become familiar with U.S. training procedures and tactics. Pilots from the RAAF and other units utilized this year's exercise as an opportunity to sharpen their mission readiness on the ground and in the air.

    "We treat these exercises as reality and it's about as real as it can get without having missiles come back your way," said Squadron Leader Steven Bradley, Royal Australian Air Force 3 Squadron B flight commander.

    According to Squadron Leader Bradley, the RAAF is quite familiar with working with the U.S. Because RAAF procedures are very similar to USAF procedures, integration is fairly seamless.

    "If we go to a conflict or an area of operations and the U.S. is there then these lessons that we've learned and developed together we could put into play," said the squadron leader. "So anytime we do the job for real, these lessons can be applied."

    The opportunity to participate comes with responsibilities including keeping the aircraft in the air and in the fight. The RAAF brought seven FA-18 Hornet fighter jets to engage in daily missions during RF-A 11-2.

    "We always try to achieve what the aircrew wants concerning serviceability and it's somewhat a pat on the back if we get all the jets in the air," said RAAF Sgt. Justin Kelly, 3 Squadron avionic technician. "The exercise will go smooth for us in regards to maintenance, but there are always obstacles along the way we need to be ready for."

    Cooperating with other nations has benefits in preparing for coordination in a joint environment, especially for pilots. However, challenges on the ground also presented RAAF maintainers an opportunity to learn from several of the other RF-A participants.

    The Australians forged new relationships while reinforcing others, such as with the Republic of Singapore Air Force, who they often coordinate with as a result of their geographic proximity.

    "We see how other countries operate and get some ideas from them on how to learn from our mistakes," said Sergeant Kelly.

    The nations participating in RF-A 11-2 have had a chance to test the capabilities of their personnel and equipment. More importantly, the training exercise scenarios have been tailored to the participants and their specific objectives, making it possible for everyone to satisfy their unique training goals while building and maintaining partnerships in the global community.


    A Royal Australian Air Force ammunitions Airman attaches a fin to a training munition July 15, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RED FLAG-Alaska participants fly against a variety of simulated threats in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex's three impact areas. The availability of a military training range with several live munitions targets helps pilots experience scenarios that are possible in a real combat environment.
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  12. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides RED FLAG-Alaska participants with vast range of training
    UNITED STATES - 27 JULY 2011

    EIELSON U.S. AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- In an area roughly the size of Kansas, the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides RED FLAG-Alaska participants ample airspace to sharpen their combat aviation skills.

    The 36th Fighter Squadron at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, trains Airmen regularly for potential threats, so they are, according to their motto, "ready to fight tonight." To meet training needs, the 36th FS takes advantage of the opportunity, and the airspace, the JPARC offers.

    "The exercise is catered to many of our primary missions," said Lt. Col. John Seuell, 36th FS commander. "Pilots face robust surface-to-air missile threat arrays and dedicated aggressors who replicate sophisticated enemy tactics, while still employing the weapons we deploy whether we're operating in Korea or anywhere else in the Pacific. The training is just as good as or better than anything we could actually get at home-station."

    RED FLAG-Alaska's premier flying range provides the 36th FS with an opportunity to train using live ammunitions and engage with a range of simulated threats in the JPARC. The two-week exercise helps reach training goals, such as mission qualification training necessary for meeting primary mission objectives.

    "It's one of the most amazing military training ranges on the planet," he added.

    During RF-A 11-2, the 36th FS took advantage of operating in the JPARC, a military training range measuring more than 67,000 square mile, and learned invaluable lessons in a war fighting simulation. The training and experience pilots have obtained in Alaska can be taken back to home station to help bring other areas of weakness up to speed.

    According to Capt. James Nicholas, 36th FS pilot, flying within a training range of this magnitude helps pilots benefit from realistic combat simulations similar to those they would find in a real-world conflict. A training sortie can place pilots more than 80 miles apart in comparison to the congested airspace restricting the 36th FS training at home station, giving them an experience resembling real combat and real airspace.

    "Pilots actually get to see a realistic representation of a possible combat scenario that is much more realistic as a result of available airspace," said Captain Nicholas. "In a range of this size you can extend pilots in a large area of engagement and give Airmen dimensions to what may only have been a mental picture."

    As a result, pilots return home knowledgeable in the latest enemy threats and with a sense of their capabilities along with that of their aircraft.

    "We are forced to open our eyes and learn; bottom-line we all walk away with well-trained Airmen and pilots," said Colonel Seuell.
     
  13. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    A Republic of Singapore Air Force F-15SG Strike Eagle launches from the runway during RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 July 19, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A allows participating units to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures as well as improve interoperability. The 428th Fighter Squadron is a U.S.-based Foreign Military Squadron from the 366th Fighter Wing at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 18th Aggressor Squadron retracts its landing gear after take-off during RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2 July 19, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Aggressor pilots are trained to act as opposing forces in exercises like RF-A to better prepare U.S. and allied forces for aerial combat.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon launches from the runway July 13, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base. RED FLAG-Alaska's premier flying range provides the 36th Fighter Squadron from Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, with an opportunity to train using live ammunitions and engage with a range of simulated threats in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. During RF-A 11-2, the 36th FS took advantage of operating in the 67,000-square-mile military training range and learned invaluable lessons in a war fighting simulation.
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    An U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon banks left after flying over the runway July 6, 2011, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-16 is assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron, Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The 36th FS is participating in RED FLAG-Alaska 11-2, a two week long exercise designed to give pilots aerial combat training.
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