Riot In China

Discussion in 'China' started by IBRIS, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. IBRIS

    IBRIS Senior Member Senior Member

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    Zhaoyang District, Yunnan Province, China, 13:30 on November 2, 2010 - Two, three hundred villagers opposing the construction of a highway clashed with the cosnstruction workers and police, overturning and burning cars. More than 10 people were injured in the melee.

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  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    china is very discipline country, where citizens are supposed to follow order, it is just short of animal mental ability when it comes to free thinking and protests. It is quite strange that something like this has happen, in the past Communist party of China has crushed protest with iron hand e.g Tiananmen square protest or recent protest by Tibet.
     
  4. luke

    luke Regular Member

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    Lol,you are not different from us.
     
  5. Agantrope

    Agantrope Senior Member Senior Member

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    Could you explain it in a elaborate manner?
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  7. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    first thanks for accepting the things i said is true w.r.t china, (i dont accept the part where you say same applies for us) , second we are different then communists China, in the sense that in our country we promote right to life and liberty, which is fundamental right which is guarded by Supreme Court of India. Plus right to peaceful demonstration is fundamental right, our forefather thought that life of animal existence is of no use, person has to grow intellectually and should have free thinking.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  8. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  9. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    ^^^^ Nobody here has even indicated that China or Chinese are any way superior, what we have said is China is just like everyone else or worst!
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  10. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    I think that you mean CHina is the worst!
     
  11. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Again you are wrong...nobody has said that, secondly, we are discussing this topic in particular. We are discussing the probability of PRCs role in defusing tension and why China even with strict regime can have such outburst of public anger!
     
  12. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    haha,it is because you don't know CHina at all. it is because 90% of your knowledges about China by reading CNN-style medias are wrong!
     
  13. Vladimir79

    Vladimir79 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Not hard to understand why people riot when they make you homeless.
     
  14. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    any anger or riot has its reason. but can such a reason be an excuse of burning ,hurting or even killiing the innocent?

    if it can, then the world would fall into a anachnical situation and become ruleless wild west.

    In fact, laws can never be perfect and unjust sentence can never be avoided absolutely anywhere.

    Of course you can easily and cozily blah blah your "cheap sympathy" to thoese Chinese riots,but would you be ready to still do so if your cars or house were burnt in the riot?
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  15. Vladimir79

    Vladimir79 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Looked like they were attacking the government. They are the cause of their pain and the proper place to vent their anger. CCP kicks them out of their house and gives them cents on the dollar, that is injustice. Who is going to stand up for themselves? It is illegal to protest so there is no other way to vent their anger. CCP brought this on themselves.
     
  16. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    maybe at first the anger was vented at the local government. but such "angers" usually simply go out of control and upgraded to "riot" ,if cars and house are burnt.

    Last year, a riot took place in my home county while one of my colleague was driving his car through the county. He told me that he got a narrow escape in the riot when mobs tried to burnt his car.

    According to the later reports, the riot took place also due to the unjust doings of local governments and local CCP boss got sacked due to the riot later.
    but, if the mobs can be "excused" of ,how about those innocent hurted in the riot, such as my colleague?

    it was the riot in my home county last year. BBC and Peopledaily once reported it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I think one of our Chinese posters mentioned that these type of things happen in China and it was no big deal. These protests vary in size and action taken is also varied, as with Tienanmen Square and other ones not so significant.

    If I am not wrong there was some problem with a Mayor's son, who did something wrong and the authorities were not taking action. There was a huge protest and the Mayor had to quit office.

    Mob mentality prevails worldwide. Whereas in other places, because of human rights activists and democratic processes, these acts of violence simmer, in China, it is put down with a heavy hand so that the negative effects are minimised.

    It is a moot point as which way is the right way.

    China does things her way and it may not appear hunky dory as far as the international community is concerned, but then China is not too perturbed as to how their affairs are perceived internationally, so long as it is fine domestically.
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China puts artist under house arrest
    PETER FOSTER

    Nov. 5: The controversial Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei, whose Sunflower Seeds is currently exhibiting at the Tate Modern, has been put under house arrest after trying to hold a party to protest at the demolition of his new art studio.

    Ai, who had planned to travel to Shanghai today with his entourage to host the wake, said that police officers had come to his studio in Beijing to inform him that he was no longer allowed to go.

    “I am under house arrest,” Ai told The Daily Telegraph by telephone. “They asked me not to go and to tell everyone the party was off, but I said I couldn’t do that and they’d have to stop me. So now they talked their superiors and came back to say I’m officially under house arrest.”

    As many as a thousand people were expected at the party at Ai’s £750,000 art studio in Shanghai which was served with a demolition notice earlier this week.

    THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

    Note: This is the way how China handles sensitive issues and that is their way of doing things. As Badguy states, this is a better way to life, where law and order or State Diktat must rule supreme over individual rights or human rights.

    Their perception of eking an existence is quite different from other nations.

    Therefore, one cannot apply our templates of law and order management, individual rights or human rights when commenting on China.

    The historical immunisation of the paramountcy of the individual and relegating it to the requirement of the State through Legalism contributes to the manner in which China approaches issues of individual rights and the State's right.

    For those who do not know what is Legalism, here is a brief explanation:

    Legalism

    In Chinese history, Legalism (Chinese: 法 家; pinyin: Fǎjiā; Wade–Giles: Fa-chia; literally "School of law") was one of the main philosophic currents during the Warring States Period (and before), although the term itself was invented in the Han dynasty and thus does not refer to an organized 'school' of thought. It basically postulates that humans are evil and need to be controlled using laws in order to prevent chaos. The trends that were later called Legalism have a common focus on strengthening the political power of the ruler, of which law is only one part. The most important surviving texts from this tradition are the Han Fei Zi and the Book of Lord Shang. In Qin the ideas of Shang Yang and Li Si were essential in building the strong government that eventually defeated its rivals. Legalism was a utilitarian political philosophy that did not address higher questions like the nature and purpose of life.[1] The school's most famous proponent and contributor Han Fei Zi (韓非子) believed that a ruler should use the following three tools to govern his subjects:

    1. Fa (Chinese: 法; pinyin: fǎ; literally "law or principle"): The law code must be clearly written and made public. All people under the ruler were equal before the law. Laws should reward those who obey them and punish accordingly those who dare to break them. Thus it is guaranteed that actions taken are systematically predictable. In addition, the system of law ran the state, not the ruler, a statement of rule of law. If the law is successfully enforced, even a weak ruler will be strong.
    2. Shu (Chinese: 術; pinyin: shù; literally "method, tactic or art"): Special tactics and "secrets" are to be employed by the ruler to make sure others don't take over control of the state. Especially important is that no one can fathom the ruler's motivations, and thus no one can know which behaviour might help them getting ahead; except for following the 法 or laws.
    3. Shi (Chinese: 勢; pinyin: shì; literally "legitimacy, power or charisma"): It is the position of the ruler, not the ruler himself or herself, that holds the power. Therefore, analysis of the trends, the context, and the facts are essential for a real ruler.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Because of Legalism, these Chinese systems have been accepted as kosher.

    Hukou system

    A Hukou (simplified Chinese: 户口; traditional Chinese: 戶口; pinyin: hùkǒu) or huji (simplified Chinese: 户籍; traditional Chinese: 戶籍; pinyin: hùjí) refers to the system of residency permits which dates back to ancient China, where household registration is required by law in People's Republic of China and Republic of China (Taiwan).

    A household registration record officially identifies a person as a resident of an area and includes identifying information such as name, parents, spouse, and date of birth.

    A hukou can also refer to a family register in many contexts since the household registration record (simplified Chinese: 户籍誊本; traditional Chinese: 戶籍謄本; pinyin: hùjí téngběn) is issued per family, and usually includes the births, deaths, marriages, divorces, and moves, of all members in the family. A similar household registration system exists within the public administration structures of Japan (koseki), Vietnam (Hộ khẩu), and North Korea (Hoju). In South Korea the Hoju system was abolished on 1 January 2008.

    The Communist Party instigated a command economy when it came to power in 1949. In 1958, the Chinese government officially promulgated the family register system to control the movement of people between urban and rural areas. Individuals were broadly categorised as a "rural" or "urban" worker. A worker seeking to move from the country to urban areas to take up non-agricultural work would have to apply through the relevant bureaucracies. The number of workers allowed to make such moves was tightly controlled. Migrant workers would require six passes to work in provinces other than their own. People who worked outside their authorized domain or geographical area would not qualify for grain rations, employer-provided housing, or health care. There were controls over education, employment, marriage and so on.

    Danwei

    A work unit or danwei (simplified Chinese: 单位; traditional Chinese: 單位; pinyin: dān wèi) is the name given to a place of employment in the People's Republic of China. While the term danwei remains in use today it is more properly used to refer to a place of employment during the period when the Chinese economy was still more heavily socialist or when used in the context of one of state-owned enterprises.

    Prior to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms a work unit acted as the first step of a multi-tiered hierarchy linking each individual with the central Communist Party infrastructure. Work units were the principal method of implementing party policy. Also workers were bound to their work unit for life. Each danwei created their own housing, child care, schools, clinics, shops, services, post offices, etc.

    The influence of a work unit on the life of an individual was substantial and permission had to be obtained from the work units before undertaking everyday events such as travel, marriage, or having children. Amongst other things, the work unit assigned individuals living quarters and provided them with food, which was eaten in centralized canteens. The danwei system was crucial to the implementation of the 'one child policy' as the reproductive behavior of workers could be monitored through the danwei system. Workers not complying with policy could have their pay docked, incentives withheld or living conditions downgraded.

    The increasing liberalization of China's economy led to state owned enterprises being put into competition with private enterprise and, increasingly, foreign Multinational corporations. The iron rice bowl, the ideal of a job for every worker, continued to prevent work units from dismissing workers while private enterprises were able to cherry pick the best workers. The decision by the central and provincial governments to offer tax and financial incentives to foreign investors in order to encourage them to invest in China led to further difficulties for the danwei system as the state run enterprises were increasingly unable to compete.

    At the same time the role of the work unit has changed as China has moved from a socialist ideology to "Socialism with Chinese characteristics". By 2000 much of the work unit's power had been removed. In 2003, for example, it became possible to marry or divorce someone without needing authorization from ones' work unit.


    These systems would have raised the ire anywhere else in the world, but because of the hold of the Legalism mindset, it is taken to be perfectly normal and natural in China.

    I might add that China is a fascinating country to observe since they are totally different from the rest of the world and exciting in all its facets.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  20. Vladimir79

    Vladimir79 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    What else would you have them do? Cut up a bunch of babies? Jump off a roof? There is a reason they are rioting... no one listens to them.
     
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    That could be true.

    The Chinese listen to the CCP and are beholden to them for giving them the 'peaceful' environment, where they can practice their favourite game - making a quick buck uber alles issues of life and death or morality!
     

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