Reentry Vehicle Fuze Refurbishment for U.S. Minuteman III ICBM system

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Lockheed Martin Receives $12.5 Million Contract for Reentry Vehicle Fuze Refurbishment for Air Force's ICBM Program
    UNITED STATES - 14 MARCH 2011

    KING OF PRUSSIA, Pa., March 14th, 2011 -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) announced today that it has received a $12.5 million, one-year subcontract from Northrop Grumman Corporation for refurbishment of reentry vehicle arming and fuzing assemblies for the U.S. Air Force’s Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) system.

    Under this subcontract, Lockheed Martin Space System’s Valley Forge facility in King of Prussia, Pa., will replace components, refurbish and test the assemblies. The subcontract includes an option for a second year. Under an earlier contract in 2009, Lockheed Martin successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the refurbishment effort. Lockheed Martin is the original equipment manufacturer for the arming and fuzing assembly.

    “Lockheed Martin is committed to providing the U.S. Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center and the Air Force Global Strike Command user with our reentry systems domain expertise and high-quality engineering in support for the operational ICBM force,” said Doug Graham, vice president of advanced programs, Strategic and Missile Defense Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company.

    Lockheed Martin is a principal teammate to Northrop Grumman, the ICBM prime integration contractor for the U.S. Air Force. Lockheed Martin has supported the U.S. ICBM force for more than 50 years, delivering Atlas, Titan and Peacekeeper missiles, reentry systems, and command and control ground systems, and has been the principal designer, manufacturer and sustainer of Minuteman III reentry systems since the 1960s.

    Lockheed Martin leads the industry in performance and domain expertise in strategic missile and missile defense systems. Lockheed Martin designs and produces ballistic missiles, interceptors, target missiles and reentry systems with unmatched reliability. Lockheed Martin’s focus on operational excellence yields affordable high-quality systems and services.



    Source: Lockheed Martin
     
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Minuteman-III Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM).

    The LGM-30 Minuteman is a U.S. nuclear missile, a land-based intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). As of 2010, the version LGM-30G Minuteman-III is the only land-based ICBM in service in the United States. It is one component of a nuclear triad, which is complemented by the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and by nuclear weapons carried by long-range strategic bombers.

    The letter “L” in “LGM” indicates that the missile is silo-launched; the “G” indicates that it is designed to attack ground targets; the “M” indicates that it is a guided missile.

    The name “Minuteman” comes from the Revolutionary War’s Minutemen. It also refers to its quick reaction time; the missile can be launched in about 1 minute.

    Weight: 35,300 kg

    Length: 18.2 m

    Diameter: (1.7 m) (1st stage)

    Operational range: 13,000 km

    Speed: Approximately Mach 23, or 24,100 km/h, or 7 km/s) (terminal phase)

    Guidance system: Inertial

    Launch platform: Silo



    File Photo: An U.S. Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) in its silo
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Keesler AFB, Vandenberg AFB Airmen build missile maintenance trainer
    UNITED STATES - 11 MAY 2011

    KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. -- Airmen from the 81st Training Support Squadron Simware section here are partnering with Airmen from the 532nd Training Squadron at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., to build an ICBM maintenance virtual trainer.

    The importance of this training system can't be overstated as acquisition of the IMVT is the number one nuclear training priority for Air Education and Training Command's nuclear task force, according to Ronald Washburn, the 81st TRSS Simware development section chief.

    "IMVT addresses certain training shortcomings by providing critical-training instruction at Vandenberg's missile maintenance officer course," Mr. Washburn said. "It builds upon course fundamentals by introducing comprehensive maintenance generation scenarios to ensure graduates comprehend ICBM maintenance capabilities in relation to combatant commander requirements and national security strategy."

    "Our mission at the 532nd Training Squadron is to graduate the highest quality missile maintainers in the world," said Lt. Col. Suzet Schreier, the 523rd TS commander. "The quality of the training we provide is increased significantly by adding this simulation technology to our curriculum. It not only brings our training environment from the 20th to the 21st century, it is (also) flexible. It allows us to expand and enhance the simulation possibilities for our students as our curriculum changes and evolves to meet the growing needs of the Air Force."

    Development of the trainer is taking place over more than two years at a cost of about $800,000, significantly less than the $3.6 million that had been earmarked for construction by a contractor, officials said. Final delivery to the 532nd TRS is set for late 2012.

    However, to provide initial-training capabilities as soon as possible, the 81st TRSS Simware team and trainer development flight have been working closely with Vandenberg AFB subject-matter experts to install communication systems, computer networks and initial-simulator-system capabilities, officials said.

    "There was no contractual requirement to install this equipment until 2012, but the IMVT team realized that training could be immediately impacted in a very positive way with a little more work, so it was an easy decision to make," Mr. Washburn said. "There is much more work to be accomplished, but the partnership between Keesler (Air Force Base) and Vandenberg (Air Force Base is strong. Working together, mission success will be achieved."

    Vandenberg AFB instructors are pleased with this new training capability and are using this new technology for their next class.

    "IMVT not only provides a world-class training resource for the nuclear enterprise today, it also utilizes an approach to training that ICBM wings can use in the future to support supplemental and advanced training needs for demanding maintenance scenarios," said Col. Michael Lutton, the 381st Training Group commander.

    "The nuclear maintenance business is a no-failure business like all nuclear areas," he said. "IMVT now provides a full-spectrum simulation capability for our maintainers."
     

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