Radar Developments and News

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by RAM, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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    Range of radars

    THE Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE) in Bangalore has been spearheading the development of radar systems and related technologies for the defence forces. A Ministry of Defence research laboratory under the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), the LRDE’s genealogy goes back to the Inspectorate of Scientific Stores set up in 1939 at Rawalpindi.

    In 1946, it was re-designated as the Technical Development Establishment (Instruments and Electronics) and relocated in Dehradun. The electronics component was relocated to Bangalore in 1962 and the LRDE’s role was redefined to develop indigenous and state-of-the-art military radar and communication systems. Today the LRDE is a premier radar systems laboratory with a core competence to build advanced systems in the L to X bands.

    According to S. Varadarajan, Director, LRDE, the laboratory develops a range of products from short- to long-range sensors for ground, air and sea surface surveillance, tracking, and weapons control. Besides this, the LRDE has developed advanced radar technologies, including transmit and receive (TR) modules, slotted waveguide array antenna, high-power transmitters, programmable signal and data processors, radar controllers and multi-beam antenna.The LRDE was roundly criticised for not successfully developing, in collaboration with Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, the multi-mode radar for the Light Combat Aircraft Tejas. But the Israeli radar now being fitted on the Tejas has an antenna designed by the LRDE – the slotted waveguide array antenna. The LRDE is also undertaking the design and development of the active electronically scanned array (AESA) technology. The AESA technology allows ships and aircraft to broadcast powerful radar signals while they themselves remain under stealth. The AESA’s basic building block is the TR module, a self-contained, miniaturised transmitter and receiver that makes up one of the AESA antenna elements. In a bid to develop the AESA, the LRDE has developed L and S band TR modules.

    According to B.V. Ramesh, project director of LRDE’s LSTAR programme, an LRDE-developed X-band AESA radar could be fitted on the Tejas by 2014. Two modules of the AESA radar have already been launched. Ramesh also disclosed that the LSTAR (Long-range Solid State Active Phase Array Radar), which is a sort of a forerunner to India’s Airborne Early Warning and Control System programme, has been approved by the Centre for Military Airworthiness and Certification, integrated and tested on ground-based systems, and qualified for airborne applications. And a production agency, Astra Microwave, has been identified for it.

    Among the LRDE’s foremost products is Indra-1, a radar that works on the Doppler principle. It has a 50-km range and is integrated with the fire control radar. It is in deployment with the Army and the Indian Air Force (IAF) as part of their air defence network. Indira-2, an improvement over Indira-1, was designed as per the needs of the IAF, which wanted a radar that can identify dense-formation targets, such as a group of aircraft flying wing tip to wing tip, and can be used even at high altitudes.

    [​IMG]


    Bharani
    , a portable, short-range, light-weight radar. It provides 2D surveillance, mainly in mountainous terrain, against aerial targets.

    The LRDE’s portable Battle Field Surveillance Radar (BFSR) – Short Range was developed after the Kargil conflict, when the inadequacies of binoculars were felt. An all-weather, automated detection of intrusions system was needed. Over 1,400 BFSRs are now being used by the Army against moving surface targets. A BFSR radar that offers foliage penetration is under development. The LRDE has also developed a coherent, electronically scanned C-Band Doppler Weapon Locating Radar for use by the Artillery Corps. Rohini is a 3D, medium-range, vehicle-mounted surveillance radar that offers 360 degree coverage and has a range of 150 to 180 km, and is used against low-, medium- and high-flying targets. It can measure the range, azimuth and the height of the target. It is designed for the IAF and will also be part of the Akash missile system. The LRDE is also developing the Revathi, a 3D, medium-range surveillance radar that will give the Navy cover against air and sea targets.

    An off-shoot of the Rohini is the Aslesha, a 3D low-level, light-weight radar designed for use in mountainous terrain and against aerial targets. The LRDE developed this radar when the Army wanted a system that could be transported by animals. It has been evaluated at 15,000 feet (4,572 metres) and cleared for induction. The Bharani is another portable, short-range, low-level, light-weight radar. It provides 2D surveillance, mainly in mountainous terrain, against aerial targets such as unmanned aerial vehicles, helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft flying at low and medium altitudes.

    The Rajendra, a multi-function, phased array radar, is the primary sensor at the battery level for the Akash weapon system, which is to be used for air defence by the IAF and the Army. It can perform extensive searches, track multiple targets and missiles, and command and guide multiple missiles concurrently. Says Varadarajan: “It can be mounted on a T-52 tank bed or as per the IAF’s requirements on a low-bed trailer.”

    Having realised the importance of timelines and technology obsolescence in the development of radar systems, the LRDE has decided to “knit the user with the programme at the design stage itself”. Says Varadarajan: “An early association of the user helps fasten the programme. As for production, we want to be involved only with critical design and system engineering, capturing the user’s requirements. It is for industry to realise the prototype, prove the concept and also be the lead integrator.”


    Range of radars IDRW.ORG
     
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  3. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Printed from

    Indian Defence to outsource radar-work and battle management system

    2 Dec 2009, 1642 hrs IST, Peerzada Abrar, ET Bureau
    BANGALORE: With the Indian Defence sector developing the blueprint for the latest long-range tracking radars (LRTRs), outsourcing contracts worth
    crores of rupees will be up for grabs. Scientific advisor to the defence minister, Dr Vijay Kumar Saraswat, told ET that DRDO plans to outsource much of the work to develop six to seven LRTRs worth Rs 6,000-7,000 crore, to outside players.

    This would include everything from manufacturing ancillary gear to the sophisticated software needed to run these programmes.

    This has attracted a lot of interest from companies such as Bharat Electronics, Astra Microwave, Larsen & Toubro, ECIL, TCS and Wipro. Mr Saraswat, who is also the director general of DRDO, said that they would try to tap the combined synergies of the research conducted by individual industries and the R&D carried out in their own defence labs spread across the country for the project. "Modern warfare is not going to be fought in the battle field, but in control rooms," said Mr Saraswat.

    The latest range of radars being designed will be an upgraded version of the LRTR already developed by DRDO in collaboration with Israel which are capable of detecting very small targets in the 600-800 km range and can spot objects as small as a cricket ball.

    The Indian Defence stable already includes the likes of Swordfish, which has a range of 600 km, and more popular ones like Rohini and Revathi. The DRDO plans to upgrade the capacity of Swordfish to 1,500 km by 2011. The Indian defence is leveraging on the technology offered by private players to develop network centric warfare systems.

    Infact, a more ambitious project the Defence sector has taken up is the Battle Management System, which provides tactical command and communication from the headquarters down to the foot soldiers.

    Integrating this system involves a lot of networking of data. Defence officials said they have floated tenders for the test project of Battle Management System which currently is worth a few hundred crore which can even run up to a few thousand crore once fully implemented. "The project aims to integrate the Air force, Army and Navy", an official said.

    "This includes the development of sensors, digitally enabled weapons, information grids which will enable the efficient functioning of the weapons," Dr Saraswat said.

    Infact one of the recent fully digitised systems integrated by the defence sector is the artillery combat command and control system (ACCCS). According to Major General Rajesh Pant, VSM, additional director general information systems in the Indian Army, they have successfully inducted 'Shakti' ACCCS, which is a network of military grade computers which provides decision support for all operational aspects of Artillery functions from the corps down to the batteries. "We are automating this. This will be with the artillary at all levels in a year", he said.


    The defence sector is also embarking on designing and developing an UCAV (unmanned combat aerial vehicle) or combat Drone, which will not only conduct surveillance, gather intelligence and transmit it but will also help detect the target and destroy identified objects.

    "The UCAV can be controlled at the command control centres which may be situated at a different location", Saraswat said. Even if one centre becomes defunct, the drone can be controlled and guided by other centres.

    The network centric warfare systems of Indian defence will also include cognitive intelligence systems which can analyse the brain using sensors or even ultrasonic waves. This can be used in dealing with cases of espionage and army intelligence gathering. "We have begun research on at our life sciences laboratory. But it is still at an infant stage. A soldier’s mind can be monitored in real time", he said.

    Mr Saraswat said technology is also being used in making weapon systems more tough so that it can withstand large shock loads and develop bunker buster systems which can penetrate deep into the earth.

    "This will increase efficiency in ground-to-ground attack, ground-to-air, ground-to-sea and even underwater attacks," he said.

    Indian Defence to outsource radar-work and battle management system- Politics/Nation-News-The Economic Times
     
  4. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    Range of these radars are keep on getting better...........(i am loving it)
     
  5. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Sorry for getting off topic, this all looks good but where are the guns :viannen_51:
     
  6. venkat

    venkat Regular Member

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    Anybody attending intnl Radar symposium @ Bangaluru starting from 9th DEC? Bigwigs SA to RM,former ISRO chairman Mr .nair and others will be attending!
     
  7. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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    India developing deep penetration radar to track ultras

    Bangalore, Dec 7 (PTI) India is developing a deep penetration radar to locate objects hidden under foliage up to 30 km which could come in handy while dealing with low intensity conflicts and tracking insurgents.

    The proposed airborne radar would have the ability to locate hidden objects under foliage about 20 km to 30 km, a top defence research official said today.

    "It can locate any vehicle, a group of men hiding, any bunker (hidden under forest cover)," Director of Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), a DRDO (Defence Research and Development Organisation) lab, S Varadarajan, told PTI here.

    "It can penetrate foliage and detect," he said.

    It would take 2-3 years to develop the radar. We will "quick-start" the project as "requirement is urgent", LRDE, which already has core technology, would like to forge a collaboration, Varadarajan said.

    :: Bharat-Rakshak.com - Indian Military News Headlines ::
     
  8. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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    Radar scientists in short supply in India


    Bangalore, Dec 7 (PTI) Top scientists today voiced concern over the dearth of young engineers in radio frequency and microwave space subjects in the country.

    The concern was expressed ahead of an 'international radar symposium-India' beginning here Wednesday with 450-plus delegates expected to take part in the three-day event.

    Director of Electronics & Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), a DRDO (Defence Research and Development Organisation) lab, S Varadarajan warned that indigenous radar design and development would "die" if the present trend continued.

    India would miss a golden opportunity to establish itself as a major player in the field of radars, he told reporters.

    Associate Director of ISRO Satellite Centre here, Dr S Pal, regretted that only one University offered a PG course on the subject of microwave, radio frequency and related areas of radar technology

    :: Bharat-Rakshak.com - Indian Military News Headlines ::
     
  9. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    BEL's radar joint venture push hits air-pocket


    fullstory

    Bangalore, Dec 18 (PTI) Defence PSU Bharat Electronics Limited's move to forge a joint venture with foreign partners in the area of precision-guidance seekers for missiles have hit an air-pocket with the FDI cap perceived as lower by potential suitors.

    The Bangalore-headquartered company has been pursuing nearly a dozen joint venture proposals, majority of them with foreign partners, for some time now but without any headway largely because interested overseas technology firms finding the extent of their equity well short of expectations.

    "We have been discussing about 10-12 proposals for joint ventures...one or two in India....some with foreign companies, especially for sub-sets of things like seekers", BEL Chairman and Managing Director Ashwani Kumar Datt told PTI here.

    "Basically, seeker is a radar but it's a miniature type of radar which will guide the missiles.
     
  10. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    Indian Army set to upgrade its weapon locating radar systems

    The Indian Army is in the final stages of accepting for induction a newly developed weapon locating radar (WLR), designed and developed by Bangalore-based Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), a senior defence research official said today.

    “We have a long border. The product has been developed and is ready for acceptance. Bharat Electronics is ready to roll out the systems in bulk. The radar can look at objects from 30 kms. It can locate rockets and even give the trajectory and give an early warning,” S Varadarajan, director of LRDE, a Defence Research and Development Organisation lab, told reporters.

    The Army is likely to place an order for the delivery of 29 WLRs worth Rs 1,500 crore, he said.

    The foliage radar is also under development and the LRDE is looking for a collaboration. It is an airborne radar which can detect objects 20-30 kms away and can be deployed for internal security and help in low-intensity conflicts such as those resorted to by terrorists and insurgents, he said.

    The radar will be ready for production in 2012, he added.

    Varadarajan expects the Army to place orders with the Bharat Electronics Limited for a large number of WLRs.

    LRDE is also in the advanced stages of developing a 300-km range radar for air defence applications.

    “Gone are the days when radars are for specific purposes. Today a radar has got the capability for multiple functions. By 2012, the radars will be ready for commercial production,” Varadarajan said.

    These technologies will be on display at the 7th international radar symposium India (IRSI) 2009 being held here during December 8-11.

    The objective of the seminar is to provide a common platform for practicing radar scientists, engineers, manufacturers and users to share their experiences, issues and knowledge to carve out the technology path for better future, he said. Bharat Electronics, LRDE, Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers, Bangalore Centre, ISRO, HAL among others are sponsoring the symposium.

    I V Sarma, director-R&D, BEL said the company is gearing up to manufacture a wide range of radars for both civilian and defence applications. The company presently has orders worth Rs 4,600 crore in hand and for this fiscal, and it plans to deliver radars worth Rs 1,000 crore, a growth of 10 per cent over the last fiscal. He said the country is likely to capture about 10 per cent of the world market for radars in the next 10 years, worth about Rs 40,000 crore. BEL has dedicated three out of 17 strategic business units to manuacture various radars, he said.
     
  11. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    DRDO To Partner With PVT Firms For Radar Projects | India Defence Online

    As India inches closer towards the development of the advanced long-range tracking radars (LRTRs), the local private and state-owned firms are gearing up to benefit from the outsourcing contracts worth millions of dollars that will come their way.

    The state-owned Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) has indicated that it intends to outsource the majority of the work in developing six to seven LRTRs worth $1.2 billion. The latest range of radars being designed will be an upgraded version of the LRTR already developed by DRDO in collaboration with Israel. These LRTRs will detect small targets in the 600-800 kilometer range.

    Indian private and public sector firms that have evinced interest in grabbing a chunk of business from the LRTR project include state-owned Bharat Electricals Limited (BEL) and Electricals Corporation of India Limited (ECIL) and private sector majors like Larsen & Toubro and Wipro. The outsourcing work for the LRTR will include manufacturing ancillary gear to the sophisticated software needed to run various programmes.
    The Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), part of DRDO, develops radar systems and other related technologies for the defence forces. The latest feather in the cap of LRDE is the Long-range Solid State Active Phase Array Radar (LSTAR) programme. The LSTAR programme is a part of India’s prestigious India’s Airborne Early Warning and Control System programme. The LSTAR project has been approved by the Centre for Military Airworthiness and Certification. It has been integrated and tested on ground-based systems and qualified for airborne applications. The LRDE has developed the X-band active electronically scanned array (AESA) technology. The AESA technology allows ships and aircraft to broadcast powerful radar signals while they themselves remain under stealth. The AESA radar could be fitted on the indigenous ‘Tejas’ Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) by 2014 under the LSTAR project.

    Indian Defence is also focusing towards more Battlefield Management Systems (BMS) and integrating the Indian Army, Navy and Air Force. This includes the development of sensors, digitally enabled weapons, information grids which will enable the efficient functioning of the weapons and networking of data.

    According to Indian Army officials, a fully digitized system has been integrated by the defence sector which is the artillery combat command and control system (ACCCS). The ‘Shakti’ ACCCS has been inducted and it is a network of military grade computers which provides decision support for all operational aspects of artillery functions from the corps down to the batteries. This ACCCS will be operational within an year at all levels of the artillery, officials added.

    Other significant developments that will enhance the network-centric capabilities of the Indian defence includes the design and development of an UCAV (unmanned combat aerial vehicle) which will not only conduct surveillance, gather intelligence and transmit it but will also help detect the target and destroy identified objects.The UCAV can be controlled at various command control centres.

    Currently, India has radars like the ‘Swordfish’ which has a range of 600 kilometres and the DRDO plans to upgrade the capacity of Swordfish to 1,500 km in a couple of years. The LRDE has also produced the Indra-1 and Indra -2 radars that work on the Doppler principle. Indra-1 has a 50 kilometre range and is integrated with the fire control radar. Indira-2, an improvement over Indira-1, was designed as per the needs of the IAF which wanted a radar that can identify dense-formation targets and can be used even at high altitudes. LRDE has also developed the ‘Bharani’, a portable, short-range, light-weight radar which provides 2D surveillance, mainly in mountainous terrain, against aerial targets. Besides that, LRDE’s portable Battle Field Surveillance Radar (BFSR) – Short Range has been developed and it is an all-weather automated detection of intrusions system was needed. Over 1,400 BFSRs are now being used by the Army against moving surface targets. A BFSR radar that offers foliage penetration is under development.

    The LRDE has also developed an electronically scanned C-Band Doppler Weapon Locating Radar for use by the Artillery Corps called ‘Rohini’ which is a 3D, medium-range, vehicle-mounted surveillance radar that offers 360 degree coverage and has a range of 150-180 kilometre range. It is used against low, medium and high-flying targets. It is designed for the IAF and will also be part of the Akash missile system. LRDE has also developed ‘Aslesha’, a 3D low-level, light-weight radar designed for use in mountainous terrain and against aerial targets. There is also ‘Rajendra’ which is a multi-function, phased array radar and is the primary sensor at the battery level for the Akash weapon system. It can perform extensive searches, track multiple targets and missiles as well as command and guide multiple missiles concurrently.
     
  12. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    guys are we using the T-55 chassis as the platform for the BEL? it sure looks like that.
     
  13. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

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    IAF wants radars for hilly terrain

    NEW DELHI: IAF now wants a major induction of long-range surveillance radars (LRSRs) and high-power radars (HPRs) to bolster air defence coverage in ''hilly terrain'' in the hinterland as well as along the borders with China and Pakistan.

    This comes after IAF has already inked contracts for 19 LLTRs (low-level transportable radars), four MPRs (medium-power radars) and 30 indigenous medium-range Rohini radars, among others.

    Apart from lightweight mountain radars for high altitude areas, plans are also afoot to procure nine more Aerostat radars to add to the two EL/M-2083 Israeli Aerostats inducted earlier as well as two additional Awacs (airborne warning and control systems) to supplement the first three Israeli Phalcon Awacs bought under a $1.1-billion deal.

    The overall aim of all this is to ensure Indian airspace, which still has several gaping holes, especially over central and peninsular India, becomes impregnable against hostile aircraft, drones and helicopters.

    As for the LRSRs and HPRs, IAF's global request of information (RFI) says these active aperture phased array radars, which will ''be used for air defence surveillance, command and control in hilly terrain'', should be able to classify large, medium and small aircraft, drones and helicopters at a range of 450 to 600km automatically.

    Though IAF is yet to specify numbers, the procurement is likely to be large since the RFI specifies that the project will involve a ''phased manufacturing programme'' leading to indigenous production under transfer of technology.
    With advanced ''electronic counter-counter measures'', the LRSRs and HPRs should also be capable of being integrated into the IACCS (integrated air command and control system).

    IAF wants radars for hilly terrain - The Times of India
     

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