Problem with President Xi

Discussion in 'China' started by sorcerer, Nov 14, 2014.

  1. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Problem with President Xi

    By :William Pfaff


    China may be said to confront four current categories of challenge. The first is easiest and comes from the island entities and states in southern Chinese waters who challenge China’s claim to complete sovereignty in the region, comparing its rivals there with the minor states and monarchies that in the past recognized the supremacy of the Middle Kingdom and paid tribute to it.

    In the long term, China’s leaders assume that such a relationship with its China Sea neighbors will eventually be restored, and this seems not unlikely. Vietnam, which seceded from China in the tenth century, would seem the most likely to maintain its independence.

    The second threat is a great rival state of its own rank capable of challenging its government and imposing its own sovereignty or dynasty.

    I would think that China has only faced such a challenge from those peoples on its periphery in a time of troubles, imposing themselves upon a dynastic rule no longer capable of defending itself, as from Manchuria or the Himalayas. The obvious recent case was that of the Manchus, who ruled from the 17th to 20th centuries.

    Today such a “great rival state” is the United States today, a threat because of its immense military and economic strength and its Pacific deployment by way of bases and major allies. But it offers only a military threat to China, and in the case of success, military occupation that inevitably would be limited in scope, if possibly lengthy.

    In the end it would undoubtedly fail because of what might be called the civilizational incompatibility between China and the U.S. In the case of Japan this cultural incompatibility does not exist, but it seems improbable that Japan in the future — because of the differences in population and geographical size — would ever again enjoy the immense power advantage over China that it did in the 1930s and 1940s.

    The third logical challenge comes from the separatist state or “renegade province,” as Beijing describes the case of Taiwan, and these days the “Special Administrative Region” of the People’s Republic, namely Hong Kong, both of which are expected to eventually reunite with China proper.


    The rebel province is Taiwan, which the People’s Republic considers a breakaway portion of China existing separately since General Chiang Kai-shek and his Nationalist Government of China was driven to take refuge there and was given protection by the U.S.

    In 1970, that ended when Washington recognized the People’s Republic as the government of China.

    The Taiwan government maintains informal relations with the U.S. by means of nonofficial institutes. Taiwan currently aspires to “state to state relations” with Beijing, as the present government seeks independence but has never actually claimed it.

    The question of whether the U.S. would defend Taiwan if China attempted to seize it is never been answered, but China is prepared militarily for such an eventuality, and a large segment of the political class in the U.S. and of public opinion would seem to favor the defense of Taiwan.

    However what amounts to a potential separatist state already exists in Hong Kong, where in 1997 the existence of “one country, two systems” was accepted as henceforth describing the relationship to China of the former British crown colony.

    Hong Kong was ceded to China’s sovereignty under an agreement that granted it for the next 50 years a high degree of executive, legislative, and judicial autonomy, including the power of “final adjudication.”

    This became part of the basic law of Hong Kong (until 2047). But what it actually meant was conveyed by the fact that this was a temporary condition that would conclude with Hong Kong becoming a whole and entire part of the Chinese People’s Republic.

    That is, it would if there is still a Chinese People’s Republic in the year 2047. There will assuredly be a China. But 44 years ago there was, in the official judgment of the U.S., no Chinese People’s Republic, only Nationalist China on Taiwan.

    Nationalist China was established in 1912 by Dr. Sun Yat-sen, a Western-educated Christian, today considered by both sides in China as the founder of modern China.

    Between his day and the present day, China has been ruled by two dictatorships, the military dictatorship of General (“Generalissimo” as he was known to Westerners during World War II, when he was one of the “Big Four” — Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin and Chiang Kai-shek.

    Chiang had reunited a China fallen to warlords in 1928, and then fought Japan in World War II and after that, the Communist Party dictatorship of Mao Tse-tung — which, to the greatest extent possible, avoided the Second World War, hoarding its resources and men for the postwar struggle with Chiang, which it won despite Washington’s support for the Nationalists.

    Now another dictator seems to be emerging from the Chinese Communist Party, President Xi Jinping, who took charge of a time-worn and increasingly corrupt party just two years ago.

    It was a party that under his predecessors had inflicted on China two of the greatest human disasters China has ever suffered, the “Great Leap Forward” of 1958 to 1961, and the “Cultural Revolution” of 1966 to 1976. The former was accompanied by a famine in which the estimated deaths range from 18 million to 45 million people.

    President Xi Jinping has shown himself a strong and uncompromising leader, ruthless in attacking corruption and re-installing discipline in the Party that has ruled the Chinese nation since driving Chiang and his forces to Taiwan in 1949. He has insisted he will tolerate no concessions to the calls for electoral and governmental reform now being made in mass demonstrations in Hong Kong. The analogy with the tragedy of Tiananmen is now widely made.

    President Xi has in the past attributed the fall of Communism in Russia and the Warsaw Pact countries to the “weakness” of Mikhail Gorbachev’s program of “restructuring” and truth-telling (“glasnost”).

    Obviously he intends to offer no such compromises. Without them, it would seem that the choice he prefers is to reopen the possibility of repeating the horrors of Chinese Communism’s past.


    Source:http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion...ntary/problem-with-president-xi/#.VGWLLY-gnLc
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It must be real tough a job to be a President of China, that is if these columns are right.

    Corruption, Hong Kong, Tibet, Xinjaing, and the Army trying to break the shackles from the CCP is indeed a great headache.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2014
  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    China Pledges to Refrain From Using Force to Attain Goals: Xi

    Asia & Pacific
    11:02 17.11.2014(updated 11:51 17.11.2014)


    China’s President Xi Jinping vowed not to use force to achieve the country’s goals, stressing China is “dedicated to upholding peace”.

    MOSCOW, November 17 (Sputnik) — China will not use force to further its agenda, for such efforts are doomed to failure, the country’s President Xi Jinping said, adding that Beijing is “dedicated to upholding peace”, as quoted by AFP.

    “A review of history shows that countries that attempted to pursue development with force invariably failed,” Xi said in an address to the Australian parliament. “This is what history teaches us. China is dedicated to upholding peace. Peace is precious and needs to be protected,” he added. “Those who follow it will prosper and those who go against it will perish,” Xi concluded, as quoted by the Australian.

    Xi also warned of forces that might shatter peace. “We must always be on high alert against the factors that may deprive us of peace,” China’s president stressed, as quoted by AFP.

    In his remarks, Xi indirectly referred to the territorial disputes China has been locked in. China and Japan, the two biggest economies in Asia, have claimed islands, known in China as the Diaoyu and in Japan as the Senkakus. Both nations have repeatedly scrambled fighter jets following reports of alleged incursion and engaged in powerful rhetoric fueling fears the dispute could lead to large-scale confrontation.

    Another dispute involves the Paracel islands, contested between China, Vietnam and Taiwan. In May, China sent an oil rig to the 5,800 square mile archipelago located 150 miles off Vietnam's coast, sparking a fresh round of tensions in the region, according to the Guardian. Beijing’s move resulted in violent protests in Vietnam, which left several nationals of both countries dead.

    These are a few examples of territorial disputes that China is eager to resolve peacefully. “It is China’s long-standing position to address peacefully its disputes with countries concerned and territorial sovereignty and maritime interests through dialogue and consultation,” Xi said, as quoted by AFP.
    “China has settled land boundary issues with 12 out of its 14 neighbors through friendly consultation. And we will continue to work in this direction,” Xi elaborated.


    “The Chinese government is ready to enhance dialogue and cooperation with relevant countries to maintain freedom of navigation and the safety of maritime routes, and ensure a maritime border of peace, tranquility and cooperation,” China’s president said, as quoted by the news agency.

    China’s president Xi Jinping visited Canberra after the conclusion of the G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia.

    China Pledges to Refrain From Using Force to Attain Goals: Xi / Sputnik international
     
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China and peace? :shocked:
     
  6. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    can someone game the system to become a leader and person of importance ...
     
  7. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    China’s Anti-Corruption Campaign: Cleaning Up the PLA’s House

    Chinese President Xi Jinping has been cautious about taking on “tigers” in China’s military.
    By Zi Yang
    November 21, 2014

    November 14 marked the second anniversary of the conclusion of the 18th CCP Party Congress lowered its curtains. In those 730 days, Xi Jinping has shown himself to be a strong-willed leader whose anti-corruption efforts have made him immensely popular with the Chinese public. Chinese news outlets, whether state-sponsored or not, are lined with celebratory editorials congratulating Xi and the party center’s successful takedown of 56 “tigers,” as high-ranking officials charged with corruption are known. But setting the gleeful mood aside, it is obvious that one institution has so far avoided a large-scale crackdown: the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

    Regardless of the media’s praise of “Xi-style anti-corruption,” the Chinese leader’s tiger hunt in the military has to date been limited in magnitude and intensity. Of 56 tigers caught, only three were members of the PLA, that includes Gu Junshan, the former deputy chief of the PLA General Logistic Department (the GLD is arguably the most corrupt agency in the PLA), Xu Caihou, the cancer-ridden former Central Military Commission (CMC) vice chairman, and most recently, Yang Jinshan, a member of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) central committee and the deputy commanding officer of the Chengdu military region. Though there might be unspecified numbers of lower and mid-level officers who are among the 180,000 party members who received “disciplinary actions,” housecleaning among the PLA top brass has so far yielded only modest results.

    What is behind the gradualist approach to dealing with “tigers” in the PLA?

    In fact, Xi has shown a degree of prudence when it comes to stirring up the pot. In the latest all-PLA political work conference held at the historic site of the Gutian Congress (where Mao Zedong consolidated his power in the Red 4th Army 85 years ago), Xi placed a much heavier emphasis on upholding the principle of “party commands the gun” than calling out venal men among the officer corps. Xi’s caution is unsurprising, because although the party controls the army, the army’s support is crucial in guaranteeing the CCP’s right to rule. The largest military force in the world, the PLA and its predecessors has been the faithful guardian of the party since 1927. Therefore, Xi must think carefully about how deep he wants to dig into the party’s own Great Wall. In addition, an extensive cleansing of the PLA establishment would severely undermine the morale of its servicemen, as well as the belief of many Chinese that the PLA is still a strict institution that soars above the corroding forces of nepotism, cronyism, and similar skullduggery.

    Another factor working against Xi’s anti-corruption campaign in the military is the resistance put up by vested interest groups. Factionalism has been a feature of PLA politics since its earliest days. Leaders starting from Mao have repeatedly lashed out against shantou zhuyi, or “mountain peak mentality,” referring to loyalty and obedience to an individual (or “mountain peak”) instead of the party center. Today, the system of patronage and guanxi is alive and well in the military, which sustains interest groups that formed around towering “mountain peaks.” In an exclusive interview given to Hong Kong’s Phoenix Network, General Luo Yuan confirmed the existence of such powerful networks within the PLA and how it attempted to hamper the investigation of Gu Junshan. The apparent suicide of naval officer Ma Faxiang on November 14 is another somber episode that showed the pull of factional allegiance, which drove desperate individuals to choose death over betraying their master.

    The tepid work attitude adopted by General Du Jincai – the head of the PLA’s Commission for Discipline Inspection, and the Politics and Law Commission – offers a revealing example of ongoing elite resistance against the anti-corruption storm. Unlike his civilian counterparts Wang Qishan and Meng Jianzhu, who have been breathing flames on decadent party apparatchiks, Du’s response to Xi’s call for a “cleaner” PLA has mostly been silence. A lifelong political commissar said to be a confidant of former CMC vice chairman Guo Boxiong, Du’s clout in the military must not be underestimated given the fact he now controls the PLA’s disciplinary and legal organs. While it is difficult to discern Du’s motives in ignoring the commander-in-chief, one may infer from this episode that dissatisfaction among the older generation of PLA generals regarding the anti-corruption clampdown is far from non-existent.

    There are, however, visible changes being made in the military hierarchy that is shifting more power into Xi’ hands. On November 6, the CMC took over the PLA’s auditing office and incorporated it under the CMC’s direct management. Tasked with monitoring the military’s economic activities, the auditing office was originally part of the GLD. It struggled to do its job because it had to report to superiors in the GLD, the same department that produced rapacious “tigers” like Gu Junshan. Now, with a new and higher status, the auditing office will likely become a handy tool for CMC’s chairman Xi in cleaning up the PLA’s house.

    Pursuing a reformist agenda in any rigid system is a formidable task, especially in the Chinese military, a bastion of conservatism. Nevertheless, Xi has decided to take on this daunting challenge with a full understanding of the risks involved. Two years into office, the CMC chairman’s anti-corruption moves targeting the military have largely been cautious and carefully measured. Yet that does not mean he lacks resolve in the face of obstacles. Although the “tigers” will not be willing to go down without a tussle, Xi appears determined to charge ahead.

    Zi Yang is a M.A. candidate in the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown University and the current Managing Editor of the Georgetown Journal of Asian Affairs.

    @Ray

    China’s Anti-Corruption Campaign: Cleaning Up the PLA’s House | The Diplomat
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Xi has been able to address his anti corruption campaign effectively.

    However, the PLA appears to be the elephant in the room.

    Good luck to Xi.
     
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  9. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Ray
    Sir, I see this very contradictory.

    One is Xi is trying hard to curb corruption.
    Second Xi himself is using corruption to corrupt other countries to gain economic advantage as well as to steal information..
    (The latest being Mexico Rail project getting scrapped)

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/65254-chinese-espionage-now-rampant-taiwan.html

    I think its mostly a media stunt of PRC to project that it keeping tab on people and its affairs and is determined to stop corruption.
     
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  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It proves my point that I always make about China = Chinaman speak with forked tongue.

    Nothing should be taken at face value.

    Dig deep and the contradiction and falsehood surfaces as sludge.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  11. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Zhou Yongkang Arrested As CCP Deepens Corruption Crackdown


    In late July, China’s anti-corruption crackdown officially targeted the highest-ranking Chinese Communist Party member ever: Zhou Yongkang, formerly a Politburo Standing Committee member and the head of China’s internal security apparatus. In July, Zhou was formally placed under Party investigation for “serious disciplinary violations.” On Friday, the CCP announced that it has officially expelled Zhou for his crimes and has turned his case over to the legal system for investigation and eventual prosecution.

    In the Chinese system, Party members are first investigated internally by the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI). The bulk of the investigation takes place in secret; once the Party publicly announces that a particular official is under investigation, his or her fate is a foregone conclusion. Friday’s announcement regarding Zhou, then, comes as no surprise but it does bring us one step closer to what will surely give the Bo Xilai case some competition as China’s “trial of the century.”

    Zhou’s case has now been turned over to the legal system, which will officially prosecute him for the crimes uncovered by the CCDI. According to Xinhua, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate announced in a statement that prosecutors have already decided to arrest Zhou “according to the law.” Given China’s current focus on the “rule of law,” Zhou’s trial is sure to be a carefully managed showcase for the Chinese legal system, as Bo Xilai’s was, with every pretense of legal defense. But the verdict is a foregone conclusion; the only question is whether Zhou will escape with a prison sentence or whether (as some in China whisper) he will be given the death penalty to serve as a warning to China’s other “tigers.”

    A statement following the December 5 meeting of the Central Committee’s Political Bureau, which reached the decision to expel Zhou, included a partial list of Zhou’s crimes. The statement accused Zhou of having “seriously violated the Party’s political, organizational and confidentiality discipline,” according to Xinhua. In particular, Zhou was accused of accepting “huge bribes” both personally and through his family in return for political favors. He also is accused of setting up his contacts within China’s state-owned enterprise system (presumably within the oil sector, where Zhou was especially influential). In a more salacious detail, the statement claimed that Zhou kept multiple mistresses – not a crime, but a violation of Party discipline as well as a handy way to tarnish what little is left of the former security tsar’s image.

    Perhaps most interestingly, given Zhou’s former position as the head of China’s domestic security affairs, Zhou also stands accused of having “leaked the Party’s and the country’s secrets.” The investigation found that Zhou had violated the “confidentiality discipline” of the Party, another reference to Zhou’s alleged leaking of state secrets. What secrets Zhou leaked, and to whom, remains a mystery.

    The official accusations against Zhou are not surprising, but are politically important. Zhou’s fate was effectively sealed once the Party announced its investigation into his affairs, but the process will continue to play out over the next few months as the case moves into the trial stage. That means the CCP will be able to boost the momentum of its overall anti-corruption campaign more or less at will throughout the coming months by releasing well-timed announcements about the most high-ranking official ever to be brought down for corruption. That positive publicity will be especially important as Xi Jinping sets his sights on cleaning up corruption in the military, which has traditionally been mostly off-limits to such investigations.

    Zhou Yongkang Arrested As CCP Deepens Corruption Crackdown | The Diplomat
     
  12. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Secret Pitfall in China's Anti-Corruption Campaign

    President Xi Jinping, Premier Li Keqiang and Wang Qishan, secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, have resolutely fought corruption since they took office over two years ago. They have meted out punishments to both senior and junior corrupt officials; the number of fallen officials has reached 100,000. They’ve more or less achieved Wang’s state goal – making it so that officials “don’t dare to be corrupt.”

    However, there’s a problem. At the beginning of the anti-corruption campaign, many officials wanted to just keep their heads low until the storm passed. Even today, some officials are uncertain or even dispirited – they have stopped “acting up,” yes, but they have also stopped “acting” altogether.

    From the perspective ordinary citizens, an official “acting up” is obviously bad, but not acting might be just as bad. This so-called “acting up” is actually not chaos but is based on a “orderly” set of unspoken rules — trading money or sex for power. As long as you give the money, you can get things done. Yes, social morals were destroyed and the bottom-line of morality sunk lower and lower, but people could still handle affairs – for example, getting a business license approved.


    However, when officials start “not acting” it’s a different story. They occupy their posts, but they won’t act – they don’t dare to use the unspoken rules of corruption, but they aren’t willing to follow the actual rules. These officials are being passive and purposefully slow-moving. So, for example, that business license you applied for is not approved, and there’s nothing you can do to move it forward. More seriously, if this sort of inaction continues, it could impact economic development. As unpopular as “acting up” is, “not acting” is just as bad, and just as likely to influence the relationship between the government and the public.

    Of course, inaction results from the fact that some officials are frightened by the anti-corruption campaign, which is inevitable in a certain stage of the fight against corruption. In the past two years, we can see that the obvious acts of corruption by government officials have decreased, but the phenomenon of “not acting” has become worse and worse in some regions. I believe that today, Xi and Wang’s anti-corruption efforts have already proven to be more than a new leader being especially strict. Anti-corruption isn’t a passing storm. Plus, after anti-corruption efforts make officials “not dare” to be corrupt, some new rules and regulations will gradually appear on the agenda. So the problem of officials “acting us” will eventually take a turn for the better – the question is what to do about officials “not acting.”

    First of all, it is necessary to break away from the outdated rules for selecting officials. There are plenty of competent aspiring officials among China’s public servants. However, for a long time, they would have to either associate with undesirable elements in order to rise up the ranks, or else protect their own moral code and end up working unnoticed, never attainting their ambitions. Such officials have a positive view toward Xi’s corruption fight, but it’s still difficult for them to stand out according to the old rules for advancement. When it comes to such officials, I argue that we have to liberate our thoughts and thoroughly reform the employment system. We must boldly promote cadres who support anti-corruption and are willing to follow the direction of the new administration’s policies. We have to break the limitations imposed by region and rank and moved away from the convention. Unfortunately, according to my observations this work hasn’t even come close to starting yet. Many vacant positions left by the fall of corrupt officials are still unfilled.

    Second, we must make use of talents without limiting ourselves to one approach. Similarly, we need to reflect on the fact that currently most leading officials are promoted from the ranks of civil servants. While this matches the practices of other countries, it’s a problem for China right now, as it goes through a time of dramatic transformation. China needs a large number of competent and responsible civil servants, and the current crop of civil servants are at their last gasps thanks to their old-fashioned habits. In addition, ever since the reform and opening-up policy, and especially in the past 10 years, the corruption of civil servants has become a common practice. As a result, some experts who want to contribute to the public good actually try their hardest to avoid becoming officials. Right now, however, efforts to clean up officialdom have given many people hope and a new interest in becoming civil servants. When it comes to our employment system, we should think hard about bringing in new blood from outside the ranks of civil servants.

    When Chen Jining, then the president of Tsinghua University, was appointed the minister of Environmental Protection, it was only the beginning. When this way of appointing senior officials becomes wide-spread, a chess-like strategy for employing civil servants will be alive and well. In fact, there are many talented people in every field – including people who used to live overseas – who can adapt to the new situation in China. If we can break away from convention and look in unconventional places for talented people, it will be hugely beneficial to solving the hard problems and ending the bottleneck that plagues reform efforts.

    Of course, we also need to consider the existing mechanism for appointing officials. Under the current system, if a powerful official goes corrupt, it will be difficult to find a single clean official in his employ. To avoid this problem in the future will require serious self-criticism and reflection upon the current personnel system and regulation and supervisory mechanisms. So my final point of emphasis is on supervisory mechanisms, not only the checks and balances within the system, but more importantly supervision by the public and the media. No matter how good the system and how good the officials, without supervision, it is inevitable that some cadres will be sluggish and corrupt.

    We must deal with “acting up” and “not acting” at the same time. We if can reverse and restrain both tendencies at the same time, it will bring about a new look for China. We’ve already seen a clear message during the most important parts of the National People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference — including Premier Li Keqiang’s work statement and Wang Qishan’s speech. From now on, it’s not enough to simply avoid “acting up”; officials cannot “not act” either. Let’s wait and see what the results are.

    This piece originally appeared in Chinese on Yang Hengjun’s blog. The original post can be found here.
    The Secret Pitfall in China’s Anti-Corruption Campaign | The Diplomat
     
  13. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Was reading above the articles. One must appreciate that the "image" of the corruption fight is admirable in PRC even though it might be real and proper and politically motivated. The image is deciphered by the people and it impacts some. This is good. It gives a sense of righteousness to some.

    With the actions that have been taken by Abe, Yellen and Draghi of near 0% interest rates (some European states have made negative interest rates) and also the Islamic banking system of 0% interest the PRC has been told that they will have many available systems in place to protect themselves economically and from economic pain. The problem with PRC and Xi will not be economic since the Americans and Europeans and some extent Arabs have told the world that they will use means to expand and protect large(st) economies with such mean even if holding interest rates low encourage inappropriate risk taking and undermining the stability of financial markets. Unless the Japanese, Europeans, Americans and Arabs create a huge bubble that bursts in the short term to teach a lesson to other not to do this (reasonableness) - the PRC will eventually also be running down the same road and printing money and lowering their rates to near zero. If Abe, Yellen and Draghi and Islamic Banking continue to have near 0% interest rates for long it will be unprecedented and determine the economic structure for all others to follow the same.

    Not many talk about the difference between Abe, Yellen and Draghi and Islamic Banking law. It is ironic many areas continue due to succession if not upheaval but not economic prosperity (especially with a pegged currency). The PRC more specific CCP need not focus on economic reason to continue to rule but non-economic reasons. The transparency of the system might also be able to impact such reasons. The position that if a person can be made happy financially to maintain power might not work eventually in such a system of 0% to low interest rates because of inappropriate risk taking and people wanting to make money that is not available too easily locally.
     
  14. SADAKHUSH

    SADAKHUSH Senior Member Senior Member

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    It is in their DNA.
     
  15. prohumanity

    prohumanity Regular Member

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    And the China Bashing continues on DFI....the ground reality is very different..PM Modi is visiting China soon to declare end of Border dispute...India has already joined Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) as founding member, India has agreed to go ahead with BCIM corridor (Bangla Desh-China-India-Myanmar) and India has almost joined Maritime Silk Road with Kolkata as the Port ..India is in BRICS and Bricks Bank ....AND soon...by September 2015, India will be full member of SCO (Shanghai Cooperation Org) India's trade with China is crossing $100 billion this year....WHAT other proof you need to realize that INDIA and CHINA will be good friends and business partners in 21st century.......in spite of all China Bashing in western media. CNN no more shows India as land of snake charmers, slum dog millionares and cows wandering on roads. They are coming to their senses. Suddenly, they need India after undermining India for 60 years.
    India and China are opening NATHULA pass soon so that Hindu pilgrims can go in millions each year to Kailash-Mansarovar visits. People to people contact will solidify India-China friendship even more.
     
  16. sgarg

    sgarg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chinese are no worse than Europeans. It is the Europeans who have a habit of suppressing other cultures militarily.

    There are problems with China but those problems are unlikely to be solved by military means. More people to people contact, trade etc. is must. The development of trust will take time but efforts must be made.

    We must not dig a hole and hide in it ("koopmandook" in Sanskrit). The Vedic culture is the most open culture and students from all over the world came to study at Taxshila. India has been teacher to the world for a long time. It is India that exported religion and culture to most parts of the world. India need not fear anybody. All India needs is to go back to Vedic roots.
     
  17. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    I will wait till it all happens and China does the GAME OVER with Pakistan before I call it India-China Buddy Buddy.
    Till then lets keep our fingers crossed as we are dealing with China..an expansionist regime using deception as prime tool in statecraft.

    The border dispute is not solved yet..I suppose..its the beginning of the end of border dispute. The Dance is stilll on.. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2015
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  18. prohumanity

    prohumanity Regular Member

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    Pakistan is fast becoming useless for USA and China. That is past when the axis used to be USA+China+Saudi Arabia+Pakistan....to deal with enemy Soviet Union. Times have changed significantly. The same Muslim terrorists created by the axis are now, blood thirty to take revenge from tha very axis that create them to destroy Soviet Union. Pakistan which is on downward spiral is not much use for China as Pakis has become a pit of unlimited financial need. China India business is already crossing $100 billion and China -Pakistan business is going below $10 billion. Is China insane to give up business with India which is likely to go to $300 billion within 5 years for a beggar Pakistan ? Chinese are not dumb ..they understand Math very well. Its the west media who is confusing you all by lies.
    What Pakistan can offer China? terrorists ...more terrorists.....India can offer a win win trade worth hundreds of billions of dollars in next few years. Choice is crystal clear.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
  19. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    A good article that covers President Xi (a bit of a long read):

    Born Red - The New Yorker

     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    The World Doesn't Think Much of China’s Leaders (Literally)
    China’s leaders are most popular in Africa, but face high disapproval ratings in the West and parts of Asia.

    Gallup has released a new poll on global public opinion regarding the leadership of U.S., China, Russia, the EU, and Germany. While most media coverage, including Gallup’s own summary, focused on the perceptions of the U.S. and Russia, the survey also contains interesting tidbits about how the world views China’s top leadership under President Xi Jinping. The data mostly serves to reinforce expectations – that China is more popular in the developing worlds (particularly among African countries) and is looked on with suspicion by the West.

    According to Gallup’s introduction to the poll, the survey asked “people in 135 countries how they feel about the job performance of U.S. leadership… [and] how they feel about the leadership of the European Union, Germany, Russia, and China.” Data was gathered in almost all of North and South America, Europe, and Oceania. A majority of African countries were included as well, but Libya, Morocco, the Central African Republic, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe were not polled. In Asia, notable omissions were Saudi Arabia, Oman, North Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and, interestingly, China itself.

    “Residents in China are not asked to rate their own country’s leadership or that of other countries because of the sensitive nature of the question,” [:rofl:/B]Gallup said. It’s safe to assume that, had Chinese poll data been taken and incorporated, the U.S. rating would have taken a hit and Russia and China both would likely have moved up in the rankings – but given the number of countries polled, the end data (based on a median ranking in all countries surveyed) would not have been greatly affected.

    As of 2014, U.S. leadership has the highest approval rating at 45 percent, followed by Germany (41 percent), the EU (39 percent), China, (29 percent) and Russia (22 percent). International approval ratings for China have dropped significantly from a high of 40 percent in 2008 (the year Beijing hosted the Summer Olympic Games) and has held steady at 29 percent approval for the past three years.

    Interestingly, however, China’s low approval ratings are mirrored by low disapproval ratings, with only 28 percent of people saying they actively disapproved of China’s leadership. Gallup concludes that “China’s leadership is the least well-known worldwide (the median with no opinion is 32 percent).”

    As the report notes, opinions of China vary wildly. From 2013 to 2014, there were double-digit declines in Xi and company’s approval rating in nine countries, but also double-digits gains in four countries (notably Russia, where China received just a 25 percent approval rating in 2013 but scored 42 percent in 2014).

    China is especially popular on the African continent, where Beijing’s leaders enjoys a majority approval rating in many countries. The 11 countries giving China the highest marks are all located in western and central Africa. In total, 22 countries had a majority of respondents approve of China’s leadership – and 20 of these were countries in Africa, with the other two (Pakistan and Tajikistan) in Asia.

    At the same time, however, China’s approval ratings in some African countries cratered from 2013 to 2014. In Ethiopia, approval of China’s leaders plummeted 31 percentage points, ending at 18 percent. Gabon, Tanzania, Uganda, and Guinea also registered double-digit percentage point drops in China’s approval rating (although Beijing still enjoys a rating of 50 percent or better in Tanzania, Gabon, and Guinea).

    Though China doesn’t reach majority approvals in most of the world, it does enjoy higher approval ratings in the developing world. Latin American, Central Asian, and Eastern European countries generally rated China more highly than did Western Europe and the U.S. The notable exception to the trend is found in China’s own backyard, where a number of regional states (including India, Thailand, Myanmar, the Philippines, and Indonesia) gave Beijing approval ratings roughly on par with U.S. residents’ opinions. However, China’s near neighbors are clearly split — other countries (like Pakistan, Cambodia, and Malaysia) think more highly China’s leaders.

    Overall, though, China’s disapproval ratings are highest in Europe and the United States. Interestingly, Germany gives China the highest disapproval rating (78 percent), higher than either the U.S. (70 percent) or Japan (67 percent). There are 28 countries or regions where a majority of residents disapprove of China’s leaders, with almost all being Western countries. The three exceptions are all located within Asia — Japan, the Philippines, and (worryingly for Beijing) Hong Kong.


    The World Doesn’t Think Much of China’s Leaders (Literally) | The Diplomat
     

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