Pakistan army chief gets three-year extension in office

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Shilpa.Sharma, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. Shilpa.Sharma

    Shilpa.Sharma Tihar Jail Banned

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    Pakistan's Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani on Thursday extended the term of country's powerful army chief by three years in a move to preserve continuity in the fight against Islamist militancy.



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  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    As expected the extension has been given. Will kiyani use the 3 yr extension to make it 10year extension is to be seen. Kiyani is not in favor of peace with India and his extension makes sure indo pak relations will not improve a bit.
     
  4. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Peace is a mirage that we are chasing when it comes to Pakistan Yusuf. We can have peace with China someday, but never with Pakistan, unless (you know what I mean).
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    With the GoI chasing the peace dream and wanting to talk with Pakistan, this extension should give them a hint that nothing is going to come out of it so do not waste time and energy on it. use it to pursue other things.
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Does he need to do anything when he is already back seat driving?
     
  7. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    1. Proves what we knew all along. PA calls the shots and will continue to call the shots. Why have all the sham elections and buffoon political rallies at all ? I dunno.
    2. Kayani has proven himself to be a deft strategist, he wants to see the end game in Astan play out to PA's satisfaction. Haqqani network is not going anywhere nor are Mullah Omar and the talibs.
    3. This will also mean heightened attacks on Indian interests in Astan and no breakthrough in peace talks.
     
  8. Mohan

    Mohan Respected Member

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    Its all about waiting few more years and guarding ourselves after that we dont have to care about which tom, **** and harry is in power we should only watch manipulate them and be on our guard. We have a bigger fish to fry from there on.
     
  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Just a thought...
    Is it that Gen.kiyani gets 3 years extension ?
    or
    is it that gen.Kiyani gave himself a 3 years extension?
    :happy_2:
     
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Gilani has given the order he was asked to do so. If he had not given the extension I think we would have seen what has happened many times before.
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    This news is for FODP.....:happy_2:


    Extension by civilian set-up a rare event


    ISLAMABAD: The extension of Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani’s term as Chief of the Army Staff (COAS) for three years is the second one given to a military general by a civilian government in the country’s history, according to defence analysts. {yeah sure....:happy_2:}

    The first such extension was given by former president Iskandar Mirza to Gen Ayub Khan.

    Three army chiefs — Field Marshal Ayub Khan, Gen Ziaul Haq and Gen Pervez Musharraf — extended their own terms when they were holding the office of the country’s president.

    Ayub Khan held the post from Jan 16, 1951, to Oct 26, 1958. He also gave two extensions to Gen Musa, the then COAS. He served from Oct 27, 1958, to June 17, 1966.

    Ziaul Haq was the third COAS who got extension by himself. He served from April 1976 to Aug 17, 1988.

    Gen Pervez Musharraf also enjoyed self-extension for two terms, holding the office of the COAS from Oct 7, 1998, to Nov 28, 2007.

    Gen Kayani is the 14th COAS of the country and will serve till Nov 2013.

    Analysts said that his extension had ruined the hopes of about a dozen other generals of becoming army chief as now they would retire before him.

    The three-star generals who will retire before Gen Kayani include Lt-Gen Khalid Shamim Wyne (March 8, 2011), Lt-Gen Javed Zia (Sept 21, 2011), Lt-Gen Shuja Zameer Dar (Sept 21, 2011), Lt-Gen Mohsin Kamal (Sept 21, 2011), Lt-Gen Jamil Haider (Sept 21, 2011), Lt-Gen Nadeen Taj (April 28, 2011), Lt-Gen Tahir Mehmood (Sept 29, 2011), Lt-Gen Tanvir Tahir (March 2011), Ayaz Saleem Rana (Sept 29, 2012), Lt-Gen Naeem Khan (Oct 13, 2012), Lt-Gen Khalid Nawaz Khan (Oct 4, 2013), Lt-Gen Sardar Mehmood Ali Khan (Oct 4, 2013), Lt-Gen Mohammad Alam Khatak (Oct 4, 2013) and Lt-Gen Shafqaat Ahmed (Oct 4, 2013).
     
  12. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Actually i wonder how the other guy next in the line to succeed feels. He has a year or two till retirement and someone like Kayani gets an extension for 3 years which means the other guy would retire even before the term of Kayanis extended term expires!!
     
  13. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Next general in the line of succession will be compensated with usa aid money ,Afghan drug trade money and land for farmhouse.
     
  14. Welcome

    Welcome Regular Member

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    extension of army chief is not new in Pakistan...kayani is just like Musharraf the only difference is that Musharraf preferred rule the nation by as a army chief and President simultaneously but kayani is much brilliant than Musharraf, he rule the nation by army chief only. and all we know who govern the Pakistani Government. All power is in the hand of army chief only. I'll be not surprised if he get 10 year extension..
     
  15. Mohan

    Mohan Respected Member

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    I am curious to know the reactions of their masters from USA.
     
  16. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    They like Kayani for some reason. They feel he is doing a good job on the WoT. Washington talks more with Kayani than the civvie govt.
     
  17. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    American like to deal with Khakhis who are real power center in pakistan than the the powerless civilian facade democratic govt.There liking for kiyani is due to the fact they dont want to disturb the pattern and waste their precious time again in cultivating the new general in pindi.
     
  18. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — The government extended the term of Pakistan’s army chief by three years on Thursday, a move backed by the United States as it seeks to encourage Pakistan as a more reliable ally against Taliban and Qaeda militants.

    Notes from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq and other areas of conflict in the post-9/11 era. Go to the Blog »
    The unusual extension for the army chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, was announced by Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani, who described the general as essential to the nation’s fight against militancy.

    The general had been scheduled to retire in November.

    General Kayani has led the Pakistani military since November 2007, when Gen. Pervez Musharraf stepped aside. He has been a focal point for the Obama administration, including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, who has paid regular visits to General Kayani to encourage him to stop the Pakistan-based Afghan Taliban from crossing into Afghanistan and fighting American forces.

    The Americans have praised General Kayani for his army’s campaigns against the Pakistani Taliban but, behind the scenes, the Americans have been disappointed with the general’s failure to disown the Afghan Taliban, who benefit from sanctuaries in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

    The United States pays the Pakistani military an estimated $1 billion a year to fight the militants. The American military has also depended on General Kayani’s quiet permission for the C.I.A. drones striking at Qaeda and Taliban operatives in the tribal areas, and has been appreciative of his efforts to ensure transit on the supply route to American and NATO troops in Afghanistan that runs through Pakistan.

    The general attended courses at two prestigious American military academies, the infantry school at Fort Benning, Ga., and the Army Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., a background that allows him to confer easily with his American counterparts.

    In Pakistan, General Kayani is regarded as the nation’s most powerful official, an unassuming, brainy general who is personally not corrupt but who heads an institution known for its endemic corruption and huge budget. As the army chief he is guardian of the nation’s nuclear arsenal.

    Although a civilian government led by President Asif Ali Zardari is in power and the Americans have tried to support it, General Kayani makes all the vital strategic decisions.

    In a presentation to foreign journalists earlier this year, the general made it clear that a richer, bigger India remained Pakistan’s chief enemy and that he would not allow the effort against militants to distract Pakistan from its vigilance against India.

    During his nearly three years at the helm, General Kayani, 58, has paid attention to the well-being of soldiers, organizing across-the-board pay raises earlier this year and visiting troops in remote corners of the country.

    Before assuming the top job in the military, he was the head of Pakistan’s spy agency, the Directorate of Inter-services Intelligence, a position that gave him intimate knowledge of Pakistan’s myriad militant organizations, including those it uses as proxies to fight India and those now fighting American and NATO forces in Afghanistan.

    General Kayani’s extension was not unexpected. The weak civilian government appears to be grateful to have an army chief that at least consults it, and Mr. Zardari and Mr. Gilani were known to be willing to go along with General Kayani’s desire to stay longer.

    Although Pakistan’s military dictators have often given themselves extensions, civilian governments have rarely approved longer terms.

    Earlier this year, the civilian government extended the term of Lt. Gen. Ahmad Shuja Pasha, the chief of the ISI.

    The news that General Kayani would serve for another three years was received with mixed reviews.

    “Kayani is supposed to preside over the finest institution in the country and if he regards himself as indispensable, it cannot be read in a positive way,” said Cyril Almeida, an editor at Dawn, the country’s most prestigious newspaper.

    “Having said that, clearly something is about to change in Afghanistan, and the army here feels need for continuity. He has understood the regional developments and has familiarity and dexterity of issues that might not exist in another officer right now.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/23/world/asia/23pstan.html?_r=1&ref=world
     
  19. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  20. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    All stakeholders in ‘secure position’ until 2013: PM


    * Gilani says president, SC chief justice, army chief and himself will complete official terms
    * No ‘third party’ behind extension in Gen Kayani’s service

    ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani said on Friday that all major “stakeholders” — the president, the prime minister, the Supreme Court chief justice and the army chief — were in a “secure position” until 2013 and all institutions now needed to work within the ambit of constitution.
    :emot15:
    Talking to reporters after he visited a state-owned orphanage in Islamabad, the PM said that the service of Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Kayani had been extended until 2013 to ensure continuity of policies.

    “Pakistan has a unique position. We are in the middle of a war against extremism. Stability has to be maintained and it was important for consistency and continuity,” he said.

    Responding to a question, Gilani said there was no pressure on the government over the issue from any quarter and “no third party was involved”.

    Referring to the Afghan-Pakistan Transit Trade Agreement, Gilani said he had set up a committee, consisting of the finance, foreign affairs and commerce ministers, to brief other political parties and the National Security Committee of parliament about the agreement and to clarify the government’s position.

    He said the transit trade agreement had not yet been approved by the federal cabinet.

    Responding to another question, Gilani said the government was not supporting lawmakers with fake degrees. “I have myself directed the Higher Education Commission to follow the rules and regulations in determining the status of degrees,” he said.

    Referring to Latif Khosa, the PM’s adviser on information technology, Gilani said that Khosa had not resigned and was working on the same position, adding that there were many “misperception” in the media about the issue. “An adviser cannot make any decision and all he can do is give advice. Therefore, he (Khosa) will have to work according to the rules and regulations,” Gilani said.

    Earlier, Gilani met the children at the orphanage and praised the project. He said 15 similar centres had been set up in various parts of the country and were taking care of 1,300 young children, whose parents had lost their lives in terrorism-related incidents in Swat, Malakand and other areas.

    Gilani directed the interior, law and social welfare ministries to ensure that all the orphan children were registered with the government and did not fall into the wrong hands. app
     
  21. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    A second term for Gen Kayani​


    It was the worst-kept secret in the country: Prime Minister Gilani’s announcement that army chief Gen Kayani is to be granted an extension in service came as a surprise to no one.
    The only thing that could be termed a little surprising was the length of the extension. Gen Kayani has effectively been handed a second three-year term, instead of a shorter extension. At this point, with the army’s strategy in the fight against militancy not as transparent as could be hoped for, it is difficult to comment on what Gen Kayani’s extension will mean for the specifics of that war. However, while there should be no doubt that winning the war against the militants is essential to the survival of this country as we know it, Gen Kayani’s extension must not be seen only through that prism.

    Like it or not, the extension does not reflect well on the army as an institution. It is almost an article of faith that the Pakistan Army is the only viable, strong and vibrant institution in the country. Whatever Gen Kayani’s intimate familiarity with the present state of affairs and whatever his unique understanding of the situation, a strong institution should be able to withstand the retirement of one man, however experienced. A compelling example of institutional concerns coming before individuals was provided recently by the US, where the architect of the present American counter-insurgency strategy in Afghanistan was replaced. This in the middle of a war that is by all accounts going badly for the US. Here in Pakistan, the public is constantly told that the internal security situation has improved, that the TTP is on the back foot, that progress, while slow, is real and meaningful.

    If it seems difficult to reconcile the idea of a strong institution having depth in talent and leadership with the ‘indispensability’ of a single man, then that’s because it truly is. Step back from the specifics of the present case and consider this: why does the principle of a regular change in leadership of the army even exist? It is not simply to give another general a go at the top slot. Regular, scheduled changes in leadership are in fact meant to keep institutions vibrant and strong. That there are ‘special circumstances’ at the present time is not fully convincing either. Externally, the uncertainty in Afghanistan, the intransigence of India, the unpredictability of the Americans — all these circumstances have existed before, and the country has survived them. Internally, the fight against militancy is going to be a long, hard slog, the public is constantly told, with many years or perhaps even a decade and a half needed to see out the threat. How does a three-year extension affect that long-term course? Lest we forget, it was just a few years ago that another general believed in his indispensability and trampled over the constitution for a second time, and yet, here the country is still surviving, perhaps even better off since the dark days of Gen Musharraf’s drawn-out exit.

    Having said that, it is the decision of a democratically elected government to hand Gen Kayani his three-year extension. The public does not know yet, perhaps it never will, if the decision was a total capitulation or the result of a quid pro quo. Nevertheless, the government’s decision stands as a legal and effective one and should be accepted as such. Therefore, we wish Gen Kayani success in his second term and take this chance to remind him of the oath he has taken under the constitution. “I do solemnly swear that I will bear true faith and allegiance to Pakistan and uphold the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan which embodies the will of the people, that I will not engage myself in any political activities whatsoever and that I will honestly and faithfully serve Pakistan in the Pakistan Army as required by and under the law.”
     

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