Northrop Grumman BAMS Program Holds System Critical Design Review with the U.S. Navy

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  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Program Holds System Critical Design Review
    UNITED STATES - 7 MARCH 2011

    BETHPAGE, N.Y., March 7, 2011 -- Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE:NOC) MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS) program conducted system Critical Design Review (CDR) with the U.S. Navy last month.

    "It is gratifying to see the design mature from the Preliminary Design Review to the Critical Design Review over the past 12 months," said Steve Enewold, Northrop Grumman vice president and program manager for BAMS. "The System Development and Demonstration program's first two fuselages are under construction at our Moss Point, Miss., facility and the first will ship next month to our Palmdale Manufacturing Center in California for final assembly and first flight next year."

    The MQ-4C system CDR, which was preceded by 10 subsystem and segment CDRs, sets the initial product baseline for the MQ-4C system. The government and Northrop Grumman teams will be working to close out action items which were generated at the review to officially close CDR. The MQ-4C BAMS UAS air vehicle is a marinized version of the U.S. Air Force RQ-4B Global Hawk. Changes to the RQ-4B include a stronger wing, an ice protection system and a sensor suite based upon components of (or entire systems) already fielded in the Department of Defense inventory.

    "The entire team has done a very thorough and exhaustive job in detail design," said Capt. Bob Dishman, the Navy's BAMS UAS program manager. "Now the program will shift its attention to integration and test with the same level of rigor to ensure we deliver an operationally effective and suitable capability on time and on budget."

    The MQ-4C CDR was an exhaustive week-long review jointly chaired by both Northrop Grumman and Naval Air Systems Command and included participants from Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Air Force, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and Navy fleet representatives from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force among many others. During the week, the system design was thoroughly analyzed and Technical Review Board members left with a comprehensive understanding of the program risks as the MQ-4C progresses to its next major milestone, Test Readiness Review which is planned for the fall of this year. The BAMS UAS program continues to meet its acquisition baseline cost, schedule and performance requirements.

    "Completing CDR is a significant milestone in detailing the system performance projections, interfaces and functionality," said Enewold. "Looking forward, the Navy will get a capability not seen before that will give the operational commander unprecedented knowledge of the ocean surface picture."

    The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C BAMS UAS is a versatile maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft system that will perform maritime missions independently or in direct collaboration with fleet assets. BAMS will play a key role in providing fleet commanders with a persistent, reliable picture of maritime surface contacts, covering vast areas of open ocean and littoral regions in a highly efficient manner.

    The BAMS UAS program is managed by the Navy's Program Executive Office, Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons' Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

    The BAMS UAS is the latest addition to a growing family of unmanned systems developed by Northrop Grumman. The BAMS UAS system builds on the company's more than 60 years experience with unmanned aircraft and autonomous flight control, including thousands of flight hours by the combat-proven RQ-4 Global Hawk, the MQ-8B Fire Scout vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) tactical unmanned system—the first completely autonomous VTOL aircraft to land aboard a Navy vessel underway—and the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System—the first unmanned air vehicle scheduled to perform carrier landings.


    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Navy Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System

    The United States Navy's MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) program provides persistent maritime Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) data collection and dissemination capability to the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF). The MQ-4C BAMS UAS is a multi-mission system to support strike, signals intelligence, and communications relay as an adjunct to the MMA/P-3 community to enhance manpower, training and maintenance efficiencies worldwide.

    The MQ-4C BAMS UAS, at full operational capability, will provide ISR persistence over large maritime distances for long periods of time for up to five simultaneous orbits worldwide. The MQ-4C BAMS UAS missions include, but are not limited to, maritime surveillance, collection of enemy order of battle information, battle damage assessment, port surveillance, communication relay, and support of the following missions - maritime interdiction, surface warfare, battlespace management, and targeting for maritime and littoral strike missions.

    Northrop Grumman's NAVY MQ-4 C BAMS Program

    Northrop Grumman was awarded a contract for the U.S. Navy’s MQ-4C BAMS program on April 22, 2008. MQ-4C BAMS UAS uses a maritime derivative of the RQ-4 Global Hawk equipped with a 360 degree Multi-Function Active Sensor (MFAS) active electronically scanned array along with Navy-specific ground stations. Northrop Grumman offered the best value for the BAMS mission - it's faster, travels farther, with longer time-on-station to provide more ISR information to more warfighters at a lower overall cost.





    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman Ships First Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Fuselage
    UNITED STATES - 16 MARCH 2011

    MOSS POINT, Miss., March 16, 2011 -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) completed the first of three fuselages for the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS) System Development and Demonstration (SDD) program. The MQ-4C fuselage will undergo final assembly and system checkout at the company's Palmdale, Calif. facility ahead of its first flight next year.

    "This milestone follows our successful Critical Design Review held last month and shows we are on track to meet our demonstration objectives," said Steve Enewold, Northrop Grumman vice president and program manager for BAMS. "The second fuselage is under construction at our Moss Point facility and will eventually be part of our three-ship SDD test program."

    The Northrop Grumman BAMS UAS is a versatile maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance system to support a variety of missions while operating independently or in direct collaboration with fleet assets. When operational, BAMS will play a key role in providing commanders with a persistent, reliable picture of surface threats, covering vast areas of open ocean and littoral regions, significantly augmenting the use of other manned assets to execute surveillance and reconnaissance tasks.

    The BAMS UAS program is managed by the Navy's Program Executive Office, Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons' Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.



    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman Begins Testing of New Multi-Function Active Sensor Developed for Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Applications
    UNITED STATES - 25 APRIL 2011

    NORWALK, Conn., April 25, 2011 -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) has announced the start of system tests of a new Multi-Function Active Sensor (MFAS) being developed here for use by the U.S. Navy onboard the MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS).

    The MFAS is a 360-degree field-of-regard active electronically scanned array radar designed for maritime surveillance. The X-Band two-dimensional sensor features a combination of electronic scanning and a mechanical rotation, allowing the radar to spotlight a geographic area of interest for longer periods to increase detection capabilities of smaller targets, particularly in sea clutter.

    "BAMS will provide the Navy with a very capable persistent maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance system to provide a capability to detect, track, classify, and identify maritime and littoral targets," said Capt. Bob Dishman, the Navy's BAMS UAS program manager.

    "With our successful Critical Design Review behind us and sensor testing underway, our customer-industry team is rapidly pulling the components together that will result in first MQ-4C flight next year," said Steve Enewold, Northrop Grumman vice president for the BAMS program.

    The MFAS tests are being conducted in a laboratory environment at Northrop Grumman and are expected to continue over the next several months in parallel with ongoing radar software mode development and hardware synchronization and integration activities.

    The first MFAS sensor is scheduled for delivery to Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector facility in San Diego, Calif., in June with a second sensor slated for delivery in September. Risk reduction flight tests of the MFAS are planned for later this year onboard the company's Gulfstream II test-bed aircraft.

    "This is a very significant first step toward providing the U.S. Navy warfighter with a new and powerful ISR capability," said Paul "Buz" Kalafos, vice president of Surveillance Systems at Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector.

    The Northrop Grumman MQ-4C BAMS UAS is a versatile maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft system that will perform maritime missions independently or in direct collaboration with fleet assets. BAMS UAS will play a key role in providing fleet commanders with a persistent, reliable picture of maritime surface contacts, covering vast areas of open ocean and littoral regions in a highly efficient manner.

    The BAMS UAS program is managed by the Navy's Program Executive Office, Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons' Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

    The BAMS UAS is the latest addition to a growing family of unmanned systems developed by Northrop Grumman. The BAMS UAS system builds on the company's more than 60 years experience with unmanned aircraft and autonomous flight control, including thousands of flight hours by the combat-proven RQ-4 Global Hawk, the MQ-8B Fire Scout vertical takeoff and landing tactical unmanned aerial system (VTUAV)—the first completely autonomous VTUAV aircraft to land aboard a Navy vessel underway—and the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System—the first unmanned air vehicle scheduled to perform carrier landings.



    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  6. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Thinklogical Selected for U.S. NAVY BAMS Program
    18 may 2011

    Northrop Grumman selects Thinklogical’s VelocityKVM Extension and VX Router Systems for Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Program Pilot Ground Stations

    MILFORD, Conn.-- Thinklogical, a recognized leader in fiber optic KVM switching and routing technologies for the military, announced today that it has been selected by Northrop Grumman to supply key infrastructure solutions on the U.S. Navy’s Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS). The BAMS program is designed to support a variety of all-weather maritime ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) missions.

    Northrop Grumman selected Thinklogical’s VelocityKVM and VX Router System, the highest bandwidth system in deployment, to provide seamless interaction between flight control and sensory data. Thinklogical’s fiber optic extension and routing systems will enable the BAMS Mission Control System (MCS) to centralize critical computing resources and allocate them as needed to the BAMS Operator Stations.

    “Our involvement in BAMS highlights Thinklogical’s ability to provide high performance and secure extension and routing systems for critical military programs,” said Dana Rasmussen, Chief Operation Officer of Thinklogical. “We are honored to be selected in support of such a highly recognized initiative. By working closely with Northrop Grumman, we’re able to extend our solutions across a wide spectrum of government and military customer applications.”

    The VelocityKVM fiber extension system is powered by Thinklogical’s MRTS technology, which provides end-to-end data transmission with unparalleled performance. This technology is key when real-time collaboration applications are in place and eliminating dropped frames and latency is of paramount importance. In addition, the VX Router provides a secure KVM solution while delivering 6.25 Gbps. of routing bandwidth.

    “We did a very thorough job, working closely with Thinklogical to design the BAMS computer infrastructure,” said Sam Guinto, Northrop Grumman’s BAMS UAS MCS System Integration and Test lead. “We based our design decisions on Thinklogical’s system performance, interface routing capability and functionality. Ultimately, the Thinklogical system provided the BAMS Mission Control System operators with a user experience that is not compromised, even when accessing multiple systems, this is key.”



    Source: Thinklogical
     

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