New NSG rules restrain N-tech transfer to India

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,539
    Likes Received:
    6,539
    New NSG rules restrain N-tech transfer to India - The Times of India

    NEW DELHI: The Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) has published new guidelines tightening rules for transfer of enrichment and reprocessing (ENR) technology to countries that have not signed the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

    While the decision to put out new guidelines was taken at the NSG plenary meeting in Noordwijk, Netherlands, on June 23-24, the new guidelines were only published on Thursday.

    As expected, the new rules restrict the transfer of ENR equipment and technology to countries that have signed the NPT and have implemented a comprehensive safeguards agreement. India has not signed the NPT and has no intention of signing it as a non-nuclear weapons state.

    As a result of the Indo-US nuclear deal of 2008, the government signed an India-specific safeguards agreement with the IAEA which allowed India to implement a "separation plan", putting all its civilian nuclear reactors under safeguards, while keeping the strategic nuclear weapons programme outside its ambit.

    The new guidelines expect the recipient state to sign the "model" Additional Protocol -- India has signed an Additional Protocol but its India-specific as well. On the face of it, India will, as a result of these guidelines, find it very difficult to access ENR technologies.

    The government will be forced to answer uncomfortable questions on the quality of the nuclear waiver when Parliament meets next week.

    However, when India got the waiver in September 2008, the NSG exemption said, "Participating governments may transfer trigger list items and/or related technology to India... provided that transfers of sensitive exports remain subject to paragraphs 6 and 7 of the guidelines."

    At the time, paragraph 6 said, "Suppliers should exercise restraint in the transfer of sensitive facilities, technology and material usable for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices."

    Paragraph 7 said, "For a transfer of an enrichment facility, or technology therefore (sic), the recipient nation should agree that neither the transferred facility, nor any facility based on such technology, will be designed or operated for the production of greater than 20% enriched uranium without the consent of the supplier nation, of which the IAEA should be advised."

    India could make the case that it would only confine itself to the 2008 waiver but whether that would be the understanding among supplier countries is very debatable.

    The US, France and Russia have all issued statements after the new ENR decisions that they would abide by their "full civilian nuclear cooperation" with India. Nuclear analyst Mark Hibbs of US-based Carnegie Endowment said, "The NSG's 2008 exemption decision for India spelled out that India's access to nuclear commerce from NSG participating governments would be subject to the terms of paragraphs 6 and 7 covering ENR. And India was informed at that time that the NSG intended to revise those paragraphs to further restrict access."

    He said neither of the three main nuclear suppliers ever intended to supply ENR to India.
     
  2.  
  3. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,022
    Likes Received:
    678
    Location:
    delhi
    so congress misled the nation and bought many of the country's reactors under safegaurd unnecessarily. if fuel was what all was needed then the agreement should have been formulated according to that only. now i understand why at that time scientists were shouting of not to suspend the research in the field of nuke tech.
    i think govt is doing good delaying the american cos to enter the market. russians and french have started building up plants and land is not even selected for americans good by pass for american shit holes.
     
    Tshering22 likes this.
  4. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    For all that we don't know, we might already be having not just our own ENR tech but also from France and Russia under hush-hush agreements. The NSG is simply powerless now that it has been kept aside thanks to George Bush. :lol:

    It can try all it wants with clowns like Australia, Ireland, Switzerland etc trying tooth and nail to oppose India's nuclear ascension, but they forget that nuclear science is an ancient Indian right and a field of expertise. I don't understand why the US is suddenly so specific about NSG and us and all that when just 3 years ago, it was practically giving us anything in nukes.

    OTOH if any one like Saudi, Pakistan etc get a similar cut, a logical retaliation would be to conduct thermonuclear tests live and to supply Vietnam with nuclear capability and strategic missile buildup.
     
    LETHALFORCE and Dovah like this.
  5. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    3,273
    Location:
    Modindia
    I would dance atop the Red Fort naked in December if that happens.
     
    Tshering22 likes this.
  6. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    :lol: I put a challenge similar to that if MMS could threaten Sri Lanka to stop killing our fishermen by walking naked all over Sikkim.

    You know why? Because until we have these vermin Congress, nothing will happen and we are not just confident but over-confident about it.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,539
    Likes Received:
    6,539
    The logical retaliation is to mine our own uranium. India and Australia have similar tectonic plate minerals, if Australia has uranium India must have significant amounts but the government has not made an effort to mine it. Mining our own uranium would free us from any restrictions or conditions and leave all options open.
     
  8. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,087
    Likes Received:
    258


    Enrichment and Reprocessing Technology, NSG and India | Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses
    I think India will get ENR technologies despite these restrictions. ENR tech was part of the waiver, infact all kind of sensitive technologis were part of the waiver for that matter. India has sucessfully dodged this bullet.
     

Share This Page