More Russians prefer unemployment benefits to working

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by AVERAGE INDIAN, May 10, 2013.

  1. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

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    :facepalm:

    A social disease which has already gripped several western countries is now spreading in Russia, as authorities have expressed alarm over an increasing number of Russians preferring to live on social benefits rather than working.

    Despite the fact that the number of available vacancies in the country exceeds the number of the unemployed by 1.5 times, many young people in Russia prefer taking benefits rather than working. Notably the trend is mostly seen in depressed regions where it is possible to subsist on unemployment benefits.

    This year, Russian colleges introduced a new entry in employment statistics reports: "reluctant to work." Many graduates, after receiving the certificate of higher education, do not even try landing a job, but immediately "settle" at home, choosing the life of the unemployed and making no attempts to find out if the labour market needs them.

    An older generation is not keen to work either. Saratov region resident Svetlana Savelyeva, 29, told the Novye Izvestia that she'd received unemployment benefits for almost six months already: "it's very difficult to land a high-paid job: you need good connections and acquaintances. I'm not taking up a job for 7,000 to 8,000 roubles (around $230-$270)/per month/. It's much more advantageous to draw a benefit while staying home."

    The maximum unemployment benefit makes up 4,900 roubles (around 160 dollars) which compares to the wage level in many sectors.
    "Sadly, it is a kind of a line of business for regions with a low average salary: people tend to prefer unemployment benefits for being unoccupied to working for slightly higher remuneration," Rossiyskaya Gazeta quoted partner of the Tax Inspector company Dmitry Lipatov as saying.

    "However, they are yet to prove that they cannot find a job; i.e. they need to produce a document showing that the applicant has been rejected by several employers. Thousands of unemployed successfully complete this procedure," he noted.

    "Due to the existing system, the main recipients of unemployment benefits are residents of subsidized regions, where it is possible to subsist on this paltry sum. Moscow posts a record low unemployment rate year in and year out, which is below 1 percent. It happens not because it is easy for people to get employed, but because it is impossible to survive even if one draws the maximum unemployment package," assistant professor at the department of labour and welfare law of the Kutafin Moscow State Law Academy Nikita Lyutov said.

    Russia has lost the culture of labour, member of the Kirov regions' Public Chamber Nikolai Pikhtin said. After many defence companies were shut down in the province, a large mass of employees, including highly-skilled ones, found themselves jobless: "people have not adapted to the new conditions; most of them have never accepted the new reality. Some have taken to drinking, some have registered as unemployed and others live by casual jobs."

    Experts noted the spreading of the so-called Italian syndrome in Russia, where able-bodied citizens aged 30 to 40 do not wish to work in principle preferring to spend time on entertainment. In the opinion of political analyst Ruslan Gereyev, "the Russian state provokes this parasitism," because instead of encouraging young people to work, we engage in labour force imports, stimulating the hiring of migrants from Central Asia to do low-skill jobs.

    "There are loads of jobs at present. There's money, too. But people, especially youngsters, do not wish to work at all. I see it all the time during meetings with students. I tell them that I'm ready to pay; but hardly anybody listens; a majority immediately turn their backs on me," the Novy Izvestia cited entrepreneur Dmitry Yezhov as saying.

    This situation is seen in all the sectors: "when I meet with business persons and industrialists, they keep complaining: we can pay money - good money - but there is nobody to work. People want to stay at home."

    Meanwhile, the authorities plan to take measures to combat this social dependence. The Ministry of Labour and Social Protection intends to restrict the opportunities for the jobless Russians to constantly register with employment services in order to draw benefits.

    Deputy Minister of Labour and Social Protection Tatyana Blinova said at a session of the Committee on Welfare Polices under the Federation Council (upper house of the Russian parliament) that her department was planning to draw a bill to revise the mechanism to pay unemployment benefits.

    She reminded that the amount of the minimal and maximum unemployment package was annually fixed by the Russian government in 2013, it was 850 and 4,900 roubles, respectively. "Regrettably, they are quite low amounts; in addition, we have an unjustifiably lengthy period when people are eligible to receive unemployment benefits, and the law places no restrictions on repeating the procedure over and over again in which they re-register, solely with the view of receiving benefits," she noted.

    To support the new amendments, Tatyana Blinova stated that the number of vacancies in Russia exceeded the number of the unemployed by 1.5 times at present.

    Earlier, Labour Minister Maxim Topolin spoke about the necessity to regulate the payment of unemployment benefits. The measure will apply not only to those wishing to "earn on benefits" but also to the introduction of a fair principle of payment, depending on length of service, skill and forfeited salary.

    According to the Labour Ministry, almost two-thirds of Russians registered at employment centres, manage to find new jobs, and this indicator keeps growing.

    More Russians prefer unemployment benefits to working | Russia & India Report
     
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  3. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    Russians, and Soviet people were hardworking, as seen in this picture from Magnitogorsk. I fear, one day, this benefit-culture might turn this land of hard working people into a land of lazy-bones.

    @Akim, @Lidsky M.D, @KuleshovOleg, @Lubov
     
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  4. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Another picture from near Yakutsk, on the construction of railway (1985).

    [​IMG]

    Hard work = Development.
     
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  5. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Their petrowealth can sustain their laziness. They just have to make sure that World crude price do not drop below $100 per barrel.
     
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  6. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    "Italian Syndrome" also has Family/Sifarish Sydrome entwined.
     
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  7. Akim

    Akim Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    This general decline of culture. In Ukraine this happens, but only young people prefer to emigrate, and not work on their country. Because of the min. unemployment benefit 880 UAH. (110 dollars). It is very hard to live, though the prices here are much lower than in Russia
    In the Soviet Union popularized in 30-50 years « working profession» (turner, carpenter, plumber, etc.) In 70-80 years of the «intellectual professions(doctor, teacher, engineer, agronomist). It passed through secondary school, newspapers, television, the cinema. In the 90 - it «dropped out generation» of young people. We are were looking for yourself - their place in life. And now the pupils of the senior classes and students see advertising or a movie, in which some successful young people. And they think that immediately it is possible to take everything from life. Ukraine is also a great deficit of workforce. A lot of vacancies. But because of the freedom of movement of the young people prefer to work in Russia or Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic in unskilled positions and receive the salary in 2-3 times more, and come spend it in Ukraine.
     
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  8. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    In dollar term monthly wage 230-270
    or unemploment benefit 160 isn't much, perhaps less than sweatshop China. Let's say , in China min. wage is around RMB 1000 -1200 per month legally.

    Perhaps youngsters nowadays with family support are in no hurry to hunt for a job.

    Sent from my 5910 using Tapatalk 2
     
  9. Akim

    Akim Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    In Ukraine the minimum wage 1400 UAH - almost like in China. But you have another form of economy. My friend came on a ship in Shanghai. He was surprised by the low prices for food. I often eat at a Chinese small restaurant. Cheaper than at home to cook.
     
  10. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Average salary is like RMB 2000-3000 for new grads. I think more importance is attached to ""quality"" of employment for generation.

    Sent from my 5910 using Tapatalk 2
     
  11. Akim

    Akim Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    The average salary is approximately the same (depending on the region), but the work youth is very hard to find. Many of them have higher education and "disdain to" go on working profession.
     
  12. Regular

    Regular New Member

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    Less benefits they get the better. Better raise pensions or social support for disabled. There is always work in bigger cities. I had to emigrate to get a job in a country I don't like. In Russia You only have to buy train ticket and You are in Moscow, Piter. Work is there waiting for You
     
  13. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Are you from Lithuania ? I was under the impression that Lithuania, Estonia & Latvia have been doing rather good economically, after defecting from USSR.
     
  14. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Well, Russians are becoming similar to Brazilians.

    Brazil also suffers of this social disease. Here the PT (Workers' Party) gov, first with former President Lula and now with current Presidentess Dilma, created a program of social benefits to poor families called 'Bolsa Família' (Family Bursary). In a short time, a lot of families prefer to live of this financial aid, which varies according to number of son in the family, instead of to search a job.

    Recently, a woman benefited by the program appeared saying in TV that the bursary value is so low that it dont allows to buy a R$ 300,00 (~US$ 150,00) pants for her daughter. :facepalm:
     
  15. Regular

    Regular New Member

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    Yes, I am.
    Well first of all Lithuania didn't defect as we declared independence act in 1990 and we went through all processes needed so it wasn't defection.
    Second, Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia didn't do very good first 10 years, but still situation was better than in Russia. And more stable. Economically only Estonia is doing good. Lithuania is OK, it's not catastrophic and we are not like Greece, but there are so much room to improve. Latvia is somewhat more problematic.
    But fact still stands that I get more than 4 times for same job working less hours and enduring less stress in UK.
     
  16. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    That's enlightening to me. Well, if I may ask, what's up with you being on this forum, DFI ? I mean, what's the Indian connection?
    It sounds a bit strange that somebody from Lithuania would be interested in Indian defence matters. Hope you appreciate the reason of my curiosity.

     
  17. Regular

    Regular New Member

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    Well I only started be interested in Indian military recently. You might say thanks to Arjun tank and FGFA. Not to mention small arms that are rather interesting.
    There are loads of ancient Indian connections cause we are oldest Indo-European and our language is somewhat connected with Sanskrit.
    And I have couple friends from India and we sometimes discuss military.
     
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  18. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Nice to know about your awareness of India-specific defence upates & the Indian connection..keep posting :thumb:

     

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