Maratha Light Infantry Soldiers

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Daredevil, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Belgaum: The Indian Army’s Maratha Light Infantry Regimental Centre (MLIRC) is putting its recruits through an innovative combination of aggression and firing skills as part of its mission to convert a civilian to a combat-ready solider. During a visit to its facilities here, this correspondent was given access to some of its new-age training modules which ran on a template designed for the fittest and the fearless.

    With a motto of ek goli, ek dushman (one bullet, one enemy), the Army officials in charge of the 34-week rigorous training session told Express that the earlier a recruit gets accustomed to the basic skills of firing, half the battle is won. “Our training patterns have undergone changes over the years. Now a new recruit has access to simulators before he actually gets the feel of a live firing environment,” says Col Tushar S Bhakay, Deputy Commandant, MLIRC.

    The 1400-plus recruits who undergo training session every year are taught the HAT (holding, aiming and trigger operation) principle of firing. “The personal weapons on which the recruits get trained are specially designed to save ammunitions when fighting an elongated battle. Pin the enemy down with one bullet is the basic philosophy of firing as far as Indian Army goes,” Col Tushar said.

    The recruits extensively train on the 5.56 mm INSAS (Indian Small Arms System) rifles, with one magazine having a maximum capacity to hold 20 rounds.Adjacent to the short range is a designated area, where the recruits get initial lessons of aggression. It is here that he mixes his emotion and skills in the right proportion while charging towards the enemy.

    A series of dummy targets are lined up to bear the brunt as screaming recruits come charging with their rifles fixed with the sharp bayonet ready to pierce through the enemy’s heart.“This is one of the most important skills that a recruit is put through during his basic training. We have observed that majority of recruits take some time to come back to normal emotion levels after undertaking the bayonet charge mission. In many ways, it is this aggression that makes or breaks a solider while facing the enemy in a hand-to-hand combat scenario,” says Major Yogesh Dhumal, Training Company Commander.

    Interestingly, the Maratha solider have a rich history of such aggressiveness displayed using rifle and bayonet during various battles. One such incident dates back to World War-II, where in Naik Yeshwant Ghadge, who was awarded with Victoria Cross posthumously after clearing an enemy machine gun, killed two of his enemies using the butt of the rifle. A statue of Naik Ghadge is displayed at the very entrance of the bayonet training area.

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    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: Close Combat-1 | Aggression and firepower go hand in hand for Maratha Light Infantry soldiers

    (To be continued)
     
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  3. Ankit Purohit

    Ankit Purohit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Great Post ...........Please Post More pic

    Thank You
     
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  4. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Ah...soldier? The target is on the dummies chest.
     
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  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    A Kashmiri village in Karnataka to train soldiers in counter-insurgency Ops


    By Anantha Krishnan M
    Express News Service

    Belgaum: Welcome to ‘Surankot’ – a Kashmiri village far away from Kashmir situated inside the training area of the Maratha Light Infantry and Regimental Centre (MLIRC). It is in this mock-up village soldiers sharpen their skills in counter-insurgency operations. Termed as the Low Intensity Conflict Operation (LICO) Village, it has everything that resembles a Kashmiri ambience, sans the snow.

    Belgaum’s Surankot has a Sarpanch House, a LICO Hut, a clinic, a primary school, typical dhoks (traditional Kashmiri huts), place of workship – all erected amidst thick jungle. Interestingly, these houses are not empty, but adequately furnished with essential commodities you may find in a Kashmiri home.
    “The LICO Village is one of its kind and we teach the recruits every minute details that are critical while undertaking Search Ops. We incorporate additions from time to time to these installations based on the rich experiences from the instructors, who had been in the forward areas,” says Col KM Bhagwat, Training Battalion Commander.

    During a special mock-drill exercise shown to Express, around 20 recruits armed with rifles and stun grenades surrounded the LICO Hut based on inputs that some terrorists are taking shelter in the village. The team was divided into various sub-groups based on the tasks assigned to them – one to provide protection and secure the area, another to enter the house in order to search.

    The sensors fitted inside the LICO Hut act as IEDs (improvised explosive devices), to gauge the alertness of the recruits entering it. These sensors are fixed right from the entrance door, on walls, inside cupboards, on utensils, under the doormat and the most crucial area – the stairs. “The hiding terrorists will use every possible items found inside the house to lure the search team into danger. They place the IEDs generally on innocent looking items,” says an Army instructor.

    The most-striking feature of Belgaum’s ‘Surankot’ is an underground tunnel that connects one of the rooms in the LICO Hut to an unknown destination outside, which the terrorists may use to escape, when surrounded. “The tunnel is specially provided to tell the recruits that in a real-scenario one cannot rule out the possibilities of such escape routes. The idea is to expose the recruits to the modus-operandi of the terrorists he will encounter while undertaking search operations,” the instructor said.
    Interestingly, foreign armies often undertake joint training at MLIRC’s LICO Village. The troops from various countries display their drills in carrying out search operations.

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    Tarmak007 -- A bold blog on Indian defence: Close Combat-2 | A Kashmiri village in Karnataka to train soldiers in counter-insurgency Ops
     
  6. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

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    If you guys want to see real aggression, go to NDA, Pune when the sixth term Army cadets train for bayonet fight and compete for the coveted Bayonet. You will never ever see such ferocity.
     
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  7. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    National Defence Academy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  8. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

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    NDA is probably the only training academy in the world where cadets as young as 18/19 years and chosen after best medical examination, die of cardiac arrest during training. You can well imagine what must be our physical condition when we pass out after three of such training from NDA.
     
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  9. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Holi Celebrated by MLI

    Belgaum: The troops of Maratha Light Infantry Regimental Centre (MLIRC) celebrated Holi at the camp on Wednesday, exhibiting bonding and camaraderie in abundance. The PT Ground inside the Centre was packed with Army men of all ranks and file, right from morning itself.

    Owing to drought and water shortages prevailing in the region, the troops celebrated a dry Holi this time. Everyone present in the ground was seen dancing with colours splashed all over. The recruits also used the opportunity to show their affection to their instructors by throwing them up in the air.

    “Festivals like Holi and Eid have a very significant place in the hearts of the Maratha Regiment. It is an ideal opportunity for everyone to bond with their buddies and seniors alike. This is what makes Army special and we look forward to these festivals every year. It is also time for our families to joy the fun,” says Col Tushar S Bhakay, Deputy Commandant, MLIRC.

    Preparations for celebrations began the previous evening itself, when the troops assembled at the Military Mahadev Mandir, near the camp. The Holi pyre was lit after performing the rituals as per the Maratha traditions. It was a rare sight to watch with the Army men of all faiths chanting the mantras while the pyre was lit.
    “Every Army unit has their own traditional festivities and we give absolute importance to them. Participation in these celebrations is part of our duty and we take lot of pride in it. The soldiers are very religious and they never miss an opportunity to visit their religious places of interest. We also ensure that the religious sentiments of our troops are kept intact,” says Lt Col Nawal Joshi, General Staff Officer-1, MLIRC.

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  10. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Jungle Camp: 12 minutes, 22 obstacles & a trigger-happy climax

    Belgaum: For the recruits of Maratha Light Infantry Regimental Centre (MLIRC), the training at the Jungle Camp is one experience they will carry all through their lives. Situated 25 km from heart of the city, Rohideshwar Camp (Jungle Camp) is one of the premier training facilities for the recruits with the settings similar to that of a jungle. The camp acts as a perfect platform for the recruits to fine-tune their jungle craft.

    There are 22 obstacles laid out in a span of 1.2 km and each recruit will have to clear them under a simulated condition, in the minimum possible time. Some of the obstacles are: Burma bridge, Spider web, Tarzan swing, Hand and Foot bridge, 10-feet wall, Tiger jump and a nine-feet ditch with fire. The bonding among the group was visible, when Express was taken through a demonstration by 15 recruits. Some were seen using their rifles to pull out their buddies, while doing the Barrel Crawl and the wire obstacle.

    “Every recruit has to clear these obstacles within 12 minutes, without missing any single point. During their 34-week training, the recruits have to undergo a 15-day capsule at the Jungle Camp, which culminates with a 22 km speed march. Here the recruits are tested for their endurance and team spirit. During the speed march, a recruit will have to may have to bear the load of others, or even carry a buddy who might have got injured,” says Col Tushar S Bhakay, Deputy Commandant, MLIRC.
    The Army officials at MLIRC say that the Jungle Camp is the grand finale of the rigours 34-week training. “It is here that a recruit is taught the basic concepts of ambush, patrolling, night navigation and two-sided defence exercises. He gets to learn these basics by actually performing them on ground. We also ensure that, at the end of the day, he draws certain important lessons and also the mistakes that he made, which are made known to him so that they are not repeated, “ says Maj Yogesh Dhumal, Training Company Commander, MLIRC.

    After negotiating the obstacles and when the heartbeat is running high, the recruits are to immediately engage the different types of targets at the firing range, located at 200-meter distance. The targets are moving, static and rotating, again testing the concentration and skills needed to take on them. Each platoon is given adequate number of ammunition to engage the targets within a stimulated time.

    This correspondent was also given a chance to fire at square plates with 10 rounds with the instruction to clear each target with one bullet. “During this firing practice, given the limited time, one has to carefully choose his target and not waste his ammunition,” says Maj Yogesh, who was seen hitting the target with every shot.

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  11. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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  12. sagarpt27

    sagarpt27 Regular Member

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    My friend regimental centers were pre decided by britishers like Punjab Regimental center is at Ramghar, Jharkhad insted of punjab it is to lower the risk of mutny:cool2:
     
  13. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Hey! Paintball Guns!

     
  14. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Cementing buddy concept while training recruits in counter-terrorism operations


    Belgaum: The Indian Army is putting its men through new-age tactical strategies to take on the growing challenges of terrorism in urban areas. At the Maratha Light Infantry Regimental Centre (MLIRC) here, the recruits are given training in a series of counter-terrorism operations, some of which were demonstrated to Express on Thursday.

    Interacting to this Correspondent during a live demonstration of slithering and room intervention operation, Brig Santosh Kurup, Commandant, MLIRC, said that the focus of intense training imparted on the recruits hovers around the concept of buddy pair.

    “We need to adopt new methods while flushing out terrorists. In the rural setting, it becomes inherent for a large column of troops to cordon off the suspect area. But in an urban scenario, it is often found that the terrorists are holed up in small groups and at different locations. We can’t cordon off the entire area in this case,” Brig Santosh said.

    The MLIRC hence trains recruits in "small team operations", teaching them tactical movements needed to zero-in on specific locations. “It’s a huge challenge to undertake counter-terrorism operations in heavily populated areas. The main ingredients for a successful operation are surprise, swiftness & professionalism in conduct. The troops have to undergo intense training to attain a certain level of confidence to undertake such missions. The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in operations” says Brig Santosh.

    At the centre, the recruits are trained in slithering operations from a Mi-17 chopper model, which is fixed on the top of a gigantic concrete structure, at 30-40 feet height. Armed recruits are made to slither from the ‘chopper’ and take positions within seconds after they touch-down. “We teach them slithering techniques and room intervention tactics. During room intervention operations, the buddy pair concept is strictly followed. When a solider is in action, he is always covered by his buddy. All training today revolves around the buddy system,” the Commandant said.

    At MLIRC, the recruits are exposed to various modern counter-terrorism training tools. “Be it the simulators, gen-next firing ranges, paint-ball guns, laser-beam techniques and exhaustive training modules, the recruit is put through a rigorous regimen. The aim is to adapt in keeping with changing times and technology,” Brig Santosh said.

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