Long Ago and Far Away: Anglo Indians

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by Ray, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Jive and Dance


     
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  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Anglo Indian Song

     
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  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Diminishing Minority

     
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  8. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Ray are you and Anglo Indian? Where are you put up mate?

    Definitely Anglo Indians where one of the fun Minorities to hang out with! Sad they are diminishing now and most of them moving to Australia etc.,
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Viva La Anglo Indians - Australian Country Music

     
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  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Calcutta Girl - Australian Country Music

     
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  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    No, I am not an Anglo Indian.

    But my school days were with the Anglo Indians.

    I was a boarder.

    A friend from the UK emailed one of these links.

    And that got me nostalgic!

    Interestingly, unlike before, they are very nostalgic about India and their Indian heritage.
     
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  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Streets of Asansol - Australian Country Music

     
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  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I am an Anglo Indian

     
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  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    "On the political side the British in India became divided. There appeared to be three classes of British. The British in authority, the British settler who used to classify himself as Anglo-Indian but changed to 'Domiciled European' and the Anglo-Indian. These three categories of the British community were quite separate in their thinking and attitudes when their numbers were small. However, over a period of several generations, due to inter-marriage, it was difficult to determine into which category a person belonged. The genuine Anglo-Indian community, the third classification mentioned above, themselves were riddled with prejudice and often the determination of the classification of an Anglo-Indian was impossible. The 'white' Anglo-Indians considered themselves in a different class to the darker skinned Anglo-Indian, who in turn looked down upon the black skinned Anglo-Indian."

    "The matter was further complicated by the offspring of the French, Dutch, Portuguese and other Europeans marrying into the Anglo-Indian and British community. Another community which complicated the situation much further was the very large numbers of Indian Christians, who were the Indians converted to Christianity by the Church of England, the Roman Catholic church and a hoard of missionaries of various denominations. These Indians had English style, usually biblical names like John David or Paul Anthony, etc.. These English style names made it difficult to determine the Indian Christian from the Anglo-Indian, especially the darker skinned Anglo-Indian."
    Page 41 "These complications were further enhanced by the fact that the Anglo-Indian (including the British settler) was a privileged class in the eyes of the British Government, in whose mind the events of the American Colonists and their eventual Declaration of Independence, was paramount. The British Government during its long rule in India could not come to terms with the Anglo-Indian community on whom they were so reliant. The Anglo-Indians controlled India and they operated all the major institutions and organizations, including senior positions in the army, the civil service, the railways and the post and telegraph services. Anglo-Indians also became involved in trade and commerce but to a lesser degree than the Indian or British organizations, for whom many worked. With these extra privileges offered to the Anglo-Indian, the aim of most of the other smaller communities in India was to become a part of this British community."

    "Perhaps because of the infiltration of other communities, the Company and later the British Government, could not quite make up its mind who were the Anglo-Indians and how to treat them. Their attitude changed from administration to administration but in times of danger, such as the sepoy revolt and when in fear of the rise of Anglo-Indian political power, they would introduce preferential treatment regarding jobs, status and general well being of the Anglo-Indian. Thus ensuring that the Anglo-Indian became heavily dependent on the British regarding their political, economic and social standing in India."

    http://www.anglo-indians.com/main.asp?menuID=6&submenuID=50&mymode=
     
  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A LAND I ONCE CALLED HOME

    Written By Robert David
    Composed June 24, 1997, certified Australian Copyright Council

    There´s a land across the ocean, the land of my birth
    The first which God created, when he put Man on earth.

    Where kings and queens and princes, have ruled five thousand years
    In a land of love and laughter, and joys and toil and tears

    It´s a land of mighty rivers, and forests gold and green
    And tow´ring majestic mountains, the greatest man has seen.

    From the green hills of Darjeeling, you see Mount Everest´s crest
    And the snow clad peaks that surround her, where the clouds come home to rest

    There´s the Taj Mahal so lovely, and red fort nearby
    Where a King once pined for his lost love, and prayed that he could die

    It´s a land the world calls India, across the ocean foam
    A land I love so dearly, the land I once called Home
    A land I once called Home.

    http://www.anglo-indians.com/main.asp?menuID=6&submenuID=51&mymode=
     
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Anglo-Indian - the term that means different things to different people, that perhaps conjures up images of life as portrayed in the film "Bhowani Junction", or reminds some of the shikari days as lived by such people as Jim Corbett in the jungles of Naini Tal or perhaps of entertainers such as Engelbert Humperdinck (Arnold George DORSEY with his band of men). To the foreigner however, it may only remind him of Darjeeling Tea, the Taj, Bengal Tigers, Spicy Pickles, Hot Vindaloo Curries, pappadums, Chutney and perhaps of those long ago years when India dominated the international scene in field Hockey.

    In the 18th century the term "Anglo-Indian" was used by Warren Hastings to describe both the British in India and their Indian-born children. According to the constitution of India however, you must be of male European descent to be called and to be recognised as an Anglo-Indian.



    Today in each of the Western Countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United States and Britain) where Anglo-Indian families emigrated to, and I might add that in many cases it was more out of necessity than out of choice, the term signifies a world minority. These families, the first generation of Anglo-Indians who packed their possessions in steel trunks, having decided to take up the challenge in some distant land far from their place of birth, and with only A$10 a family in their pockets and no assisted passages being granted to them, were the fore-bearers of the Anglo-Indian culture, a culture that was bred and developed over many years into a mixed race that lent itself to being rich in so many other ways.

    The children and grand children of these early Anglo-Indian families, are now tracing back their ancestry and family trees, for they realise that the opportunities that are now being made available to them to realise their full potential as talented individuals in so many fields, have been due to a very large extent to that decision made by their parents and grand parents for their own benefit. It is fair to say therefore that the reasons for their journey to the land of their parents place of birth (India) will be for more than to satisfy their inherited appetite for Indian Cuisine.



    This page is dedicated to those early pioneers who had the courage to embark on maiden voyages heading for distant lands and leaving behind family, friends and fond memories.

    To them we say "THANK YOU".

    http://www.sumgenius.com.au/index.htm
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Calcutta's Anglo-Indians

    Calcutta, once the capital of British Raj, is home to the country's largest population of Anglo-Indians, a fast-vanishing group of native English-speakers who are of mixed European and Indian ancestry. Anglos thrived under the British, who set aside important government jobs for them, especially ones having to do with the railways. Many others were successful teachers, secretaries, nurses and singers. But after Independence many Anglo-Indians left for North America, England, and Australia, fearing hostility from other Indians who identified them with the former rulers.

    The exodus continues, but the dwindling community works hard to maintain its identity. Younger generations marry outside the community and are gaining familiarity with the Bengali language and culture. But at home, they eat chicken jalfrezi (with tomatoes and green chillies) and other Anglo-Indian dishes, attend the community's churches and speak perfect English with little trace of an Indian accent. At Christmas, Anglo-Indians from around the world come to dance, sing, and party on the the narrow street that anchors Bow Barracks, a century-old neighborhood of Anglo-Indians behind Bowbazar Police Station in Central Calcutta. Among the most famous Anglo-Indians are singers Engelbert Humperdinck and Cliff Richard, who spent his early childhood in Calcutta.

    http://www.fodors.com/world/asia/india/kolkata-calcutta/feature_30007.html
     
  18. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andaman_and_Nicobar_Islands
    When we are talking about the Anglo-Indians, just imagine how the future of the sub-continent and SE Asia would have been if the British would have actually gone ahead and implemented their plan of settling them in a new nation called 'Andaman and Nicobar'!

    In that case, they would surely not be far awar from our land or conscience! :)
     
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Settling is a question, but to be economically viable would be another.

    A&N Islands, as a separate Nation, would have spelt the death knell to its pristine beauty and nature's boon.
     
  20. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    Completely agree with your second statement. To add to that, it surely would have been a complete disaster to the indigeneous tribes.

    As for the first part, regarding the economic viability, A & N islands, with the Anglo Indians in charge could have been a economic powerhouse, with its strategic location right next to the Asian tigers. Survival, to start with, would have been difficult, but I guess all this is a topic for another thread! :)
     

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