Indian Dreams and the Reverse Brain Drain

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by Singh, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    The following pictorial article highlights, how many non-resident Indians and foreigners are coming to India to participate in the Indian dream.

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    Decades ago, millions of Indians left their country in search of better opportunities in the West. But there has been a reversal in recent years, with thousands of people now moving to India.

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    Ashifa, 31, USA. "I came to work in development and stayed because there were such great opportunities for further work. I am also a ballet teacher. I met my husband here and we are expecting our first baby."

    For most people, the "Indian dream" is about economic opportunity. India, unlike many Western nations, is showing significant growth (albeit at a slower pace now than at the start of the decade). Large expat communities now exist in every major city.

    There are also many who already have attachments to India, for whom the transition and culture shock from New York or London or Sydney is, in theory, much easier. Indians who have successfully studied and worked abroad are returning home, and the large diaspora of people of Indian origin is also exploring the possibilities on offer.

    But it is sometimes far from a dream. India can provide a challenging environment, and for some, the realities of life bear little resemblance to their original expectations.

    What does 'the Indian dream' mean for you?

    BBC News - In pictures: Indian dream

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    Emily, 35, Australia. "When I came to Mumbai, I didn't feel a culture shock. I have built a thriving business. Life in India can be unforgiving, but you can find peace among chaos and method in the madness!"

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    Marco, 25, from Italy. "There is very little globally-focused work in Italy. The economy isn't doing well. Mumbai was very tough to start with but I've acclimatised and I now love it."

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    Jennifer, 26, from the UK. "I've set up several e-commerce ventures in India. There are many incredible opportunities but doing business and living here requires perseverance, a thick skin and patience."
     
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  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    [​IMG]
    Kunwar, 23, Australia. "I dream of working in Bollywood. It's very difficult, with many untrustworthy people around. I'm going back to Mumbai soon, putting my studies and job on hold."

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    Igor, 23, from Brazil. "I wanted to work in another's Brics country to broaden my knowledge and take that home with me. Whenever I tell anyone where I'm from, their eyes light up."

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    Matthew, 24, from the UK. "I trained as a teacher at Cambridge, but instead decided to work in education in India. I've settled well, and I see myself staying here a long time."
     
  4. Shaitan

    Shaitan Zandu balm all day Senior Member

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    Last edited: Sep 30, 2012
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  5. Shaitan

    Shaitan Zandu balm all day Senior Member

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  6. panduranghari

    panduranghari Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hodges: The UK's Looming Brain Drain - CNBC

    BBC News - US 'reverse brain drain' to India now in full swing

    ‘Reverse brain drain’ in the U.S. | Need to Know | PBS

    Life in the west is terrible. Other than money there is nothing on offer. And now even that is running out.

    But saying that - the politicians have kept India an unworthy place to live in.

    Provide regular water electricity with minimal corruption, most oversea Indians will return to India.

    Personally, I treat UK like Brits treated India during colonial era. A good place to make money thats it. 10 years is a long time in the west. Cannot imagine living in THE WEST forever. Though one can get everything from Star TV to bhel puri in England, its a terribly xenophobic society. No matter what you do.

    Indians in generally a grafters, they are willing to work hard. They usually are successful where ever they live in the world. The Indian politician prefers to not allow the natural ability of Indians to shine. Pity.
     
  7. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    ^ apna ghar apne log apna desh sabko aacha lagta hai chai usme kitni kamiya ho.
     
  8. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I completely concur with your views on not being able to live in the West. You have managed for 10 years, I don't think I could even manage two! One can never really gain acceptance or completely feel "part" of their society. You are always an outsider. There is always a great deal of underlying xenophobia and distrust.

    I travel to the West very frequently on work - and I realize that the "respect" and "deference" that one gets there is only if one stays in the top hotels, travels by cab, tips them generously, moves around in business suits, and so on - all at the company's expense. Getting out of that secure shell and trying to gel with society at large will expose one to all the xenophobia and distrust that you refer to.
     
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