Indian Army regiments and their History

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by F-14, May 16, 2009.

  1. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    Brigade of the Guards

    The Brigade of the Guards is an Indian Mechanized Infantry regiment, which was once the only regiment of Foot Guards in the Indian Army. Formed in 1949 as the first mixed class Indian regiment by Field Marshal KM Cariappa, the first battalions of the Brigade of Guards were formed by taking the oldest battalions of some of the infantry regiments of the Indian Army. The President of India is the Honorary Colonel-in-Chief and the Chief of Army Staff is the Colonel-in-Chief of The Guards. The Guards Regimental Centre is at Kamptee in Maharashtra.

    The regiment currently consists of a total of 19 battalions which are as Follows

    1st Battalion (former 2 Punjab)

    The first battalion was raised at Trichinopoly in 1761 as "Coast Sepoys". The first four battalions were raised during the hostilities in the Carnatic in south India between 1761 and 1776. The numbers and titles of the battalions changed during the successive reorganisations of the Madras Presidency Army and later of the Indian Army.


    The regiment insginia is of a naval vessel, a galley. It was awarded to 69th Punjabis in recognition of the readiness to serve overseas, after the battalion had fought in eight overseas campaigns by 1824.


    2nd Battalion (former 1 Grenadiers) (101st grenadiers)

    The second battalion guards traces its orgins back to the 101st Granadiers

    The Regiment was first formed in 1778 after 6 grenadier companies (two companies each from the three battalions of the Bombay Army) were combined to form a composite battalion. The Regiment took part in the First Mahratta War against the Mahratta Empire and fought in a number of engagements against them, including the Battle of Talegoan where they fought with distinction. As a consequence of the unit's impressive performances it was formally created into a permanent unit as the 8th Regiment of Bombay Sepoys.

    In 1783 the regiment's title was altered to become the 8th Grenadier Regiment of Bombay Sepoys, and was also known simply as the Bombay Grenadiers. The Regiment claimed that it was the oldest grenadier regiment in the British Empire; the British Army Grenadier Guards did not gain its Grenadier title until 1815 after its actions against the French grenadiers at the Battle of Waterloo.

    In consequence of the Indian Army reforms of 1922, the Regiment amalgamated with 5 other regiments to form 5 battalions of the 4th Bombay Grenadiers; the 101st Grenadiers became the 1st Battalion of the new regiment. The battalion had the distinction of being allowed to have its own cap badge. After Indian became independent from the British Empire, the 4th Grenadiers were allocated to the Indian Army, becoming simply The Grenadiers. The Battalion that was once the 101st was transferred to the Brigade of the Guards in 1952, becoming its 2nd Battalion (2 Guards).

    3rd Battalion (former 1 Rajputana Rifles)

    4th Battalion (former 1 Rajput)

    the Fourth Guards trace their lieanage back to 2nd Queen Victoria's Own Rajput Light Infantry The British East India Company raised a 2nd Battalion for the 15th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry (BNI) in 1798. As such, it fought at Delhi, Laswari, Deeg, and Bharatpur. For its service under General Lake during the Second Anglo-Maratha War, the battalion was granted an honorary colour. An additional jemadar was employed on its strength to carry it.

    The battalion was separated from the 15th in 1828, to form the 31st BNI. Its first campaign as a regiment was in 1839, in the First Anglo-Afghan War. The regiment fought at Kalat, a fortress captured on 13 November. Three battle honours were awarded during the Second Anglo-Sikh War, two for the battles of Chillianwala and Gujarat.

    In the Indian rebellion of 1857, the regiment did not mutiny and fought in the Central India Campaign. Almost the entire Bengal Army had mutinied and in the ensuing disbandment of its regiments, the 31st became the second most senior. When Queen Victoria became Empress of India in 1876, the regiment became the 2nd (Queen's Own) Regiment of Bengal Native Light Infantry.

    The regiment later served in the Second Afghan War and contributed to the international force that intervened in the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. Two additional battalions were raised during the First World War, the 2nd in 1917 and the 3rd in 1918. The regiment served in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Afghanistan.

    Reorganisation of the Indian Army in 1922 resulted in its amalgamation with the 4th, 7th, 8th, 11th, and 16th Rajputs, to form the 7th Rajput Regiment. The 2nd Rajputs, upon becoming the 1st Battalion, retained its title, albeit as a subtitle. After India's independence, the battalion was elevated to "Guard" status and transferred to the Brigade of the Guards as its 4th Battalion.

    5th Battalion
    6th Battalion
    7th Battalion
    8th Battalion
    9th Battalion
    10th Battalion
    11th Battalion
    12th Battalion
    13th Battalion
    14th Battalion
    15th Battalion
    16th Battalion
    17th Battalion
    18th Battalion
    19th Battalion

    The regiment has won

    2 Param Vir Chakras, 2 Ashoka Chakras, 1 Padma Bhushan, 8 Param Vishisht Seva Medals, 6 Maha Vir Chakras, 4 Kirti Chakras, 46 Vir Chakras, 18 Shaurya Chakras, 77 Sena Medals, 10 Ati Vishisht Seva Medals, 3 Yudh Seva Medals, 16 Vishisht Seva Medals, 45 Mention-in-Despatches, 151 COAS's Commendation Cards and 79 GOC-in-C's Commendation Cards

    and 9 Battle honours

    Akhaura, Burki, Gadra Road, Hilli, Naushera, Gurais, Shingo River Valley, Sylhet and Ganga Sagar
     
  2.  
  3. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,517
    Location:
    Somewhere
  5. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes Received:
    216
  6. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    it aslo has the Oldest Battalion

    the 9th (Travancore)
     
  7. NSG_Blackcats

    NSG_Blackcats Member of The Month OCTOBER 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,485
    Likes Received:
    1,547
    Location:
    Delhi
    The Rajputana Rifles

    The name Rajputana Rifles is derived from the Hindi word Rajputana which was the old name of Rajasthan. It is based on the Sanskrit word Rajputra meaning son of a king.

    The Rajputana Rifles is the most senior rifle regiment of the Indian Army. It was originally raised in 1921 as part of the British Indian Army, when six previously existing regiments were amalgamated together to form six battalions of the 6th Rajputana Rifles. In 1945 the numeral designation was dropped from the title and in 1947 the regiment was transferred to the newly independent Indian Army. Since independence, the regiment has been involved in a number of conflicts against Pakistan, as well as contributing to the United Nations Custodian Force in Korea in the 1950s and to the UN Mission to the Congo in 1962. Over the course of its existence the regiment has had the distinction of receiving six Victoria Crosses and one Param Vic Chakra as well as many other decorations and honours.

    [​IMG]

    CopyRight :- Bharat Rakshak

    [​IMG]

    More
     
  8. NSG_Blackcats

    NSG_Blackcats Member of The Month OCTOBER 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,485
    Likes Received:
    1,547
    Location:
    Delhi
    The Rajput regiment

    The Rajput regiment is a regiment in the Indian Army that is composed primarily of the Rajput clans from India. The British designated the Rajputs as a martial race and subsequently employed large numbers of these warriors in the British Indian Army.

    Most of the Rajput battalions saw action during World War 1. The 1st Battalion fought at the Battle of Dujailah in Mesopatamia, where it was nearly annihilated. The 3rd Battalion fought the Battles of Qurna and Kut-al-Amara against the Turks.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    More
     
  9. NSG_Blackcats

    NSG_Blackcats Member of The Month OCTOBER 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,485
    Likes Received:
    1,547
    Location:
    Delhi
    The Garhwal Rifles

    The Garhwal Rifles is a light infantry or 'rifle' regiment of the Indian Army. It was originally raised as the 39th Garhwal Rifles part of the British Indian Army on formation, and renamed on Indian independence. It served during the Frontier campaigns of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, as well in both the World Wars and the wars fought after Independence. Mainly made up of Garhwali soldiers, this regiment has a distinguished record and a unique identity. Today it is made up of more than 25,000 soldiers, organised into nineteen regular battalions (i.e. 2nd to 19th) and the Garhwal Scouts, who are stationed permanently at Joshimath. The 1st Battalion is currently being converted to a mechanised infantry unit.

    Soldiers recruited into the Garhwal Rifles are from the Garhwal Hills, which is arguably one of the most beautiful areas of the Himalayas. These men are known for their hardiness, simplicity and upright manner. Garhwal consists almost entirely of rugged mountain ranges running in all directions, and separated by narrow valleys which in some cases become deep gorges or ravines.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    More
     
  10. NSG_Blackcats

    NSG_Blackcats Member of The Month OCTOBER 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,485
    Likes Received:
    1,547
    Location:
    Delhi
    The Kumaon Regiment

    The Kumaon Regiment is one of the most decorated regiments of the Indian Army. The regiment traces its origins with the British Indian Army and has fought in various campaigns including the two world wars. After independence, the regiment has fought in all major conflicts involving India.

    Kumaonis have been famous for their valour, their courage was legendary, their honour indomitable. The Kumaonis were not fully subjugated by the powerful Muslim dynasties of Delhi.

    [​IMG]

    More
     
  11. ajay_ijn

    ajay_ijn Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    28
    sir there is not much info in internet about armoured or artillery regiments. are they not as popular as infantry regiments. after all artillery regiments played vital role in almost every war India fought since independence.
     
  12. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    NSG the The Kumaon Regiment traces back its roots to the Nizam's regiments
    The senior battalions of the regiment were drawn from the Nizams' contingent and the present fourth and the fifth battalions proudly trace their lineage back to 1788, when they were first raised as the first and second regiments of the then Subedar of Berar, Muhamad Salabat Khan's Ellichpur Brigade. The present second battalion (Berar) too has a proud history of nearly 206 years. It was raised as the 1st Berar Infantry of the Nizams contingent.

    Between 1826 and 1903, the Indian Army was reorganised thrice. The Nizams' contingent was renamed as the Hyderabad Contingent. In 1922, the Indian Army was reorganised again and Hyderabad Contingent was renamed as the 19th Hyderabad Regiment. More importantly, the class composition of battalions was altered. The Deccan Muslims in each battalion were replaced by a company each of Kumaonis, Jats, Ahirs and others. Thus, the active links with the Deccan were supplanted by those of the Kumaon region. The year 1923 marked the affiliation of the newly raised 1st Kumaon Rifles which was drawn from the Royal Garhwal Rifles with the 19th Hyderabad Regiment. Thus, the 1st Kumaon Rifles was composed solely of Kumaoni troops.

    During the Battalion Commanders' Conference held on February 12, 1935, a unanimous decision was taken to request the Army Headquarters for changing the name of the regiment from "19th Hyderabad Regiment" to "19th Kumaon Regiment." The proposal was, however, rejected by Army Headquarters for two reasons. First, the case was not projected properly and second, the redesignation of various units and regiments of the Army was finalised only 13 years back in 1922. A change so soon was not favoured by Army Headquarters.

    By Second World War, the process of Indianisation of the Armed Forces gained momentum. The Kumaon regiment was no exception. Gradually, the heroic deeds of its battalions in Burma and Malaya earned the regiment many battle honours like North Africa, North Malaya, Slim River, Burma, Kangaw, Shweli, Magwe, Kama, and Sittang.

    As the links with Hyderabad and Deccan began to diminish slowly, the demand to rename the regiment grew. Keeping this in view, on October 27, 1945, the name of the regiment was changed to '19 Kumaon Regiment'. Later, '19' was dropped from the name. Similarly, 1 Kumaon Rifles, having been completely amalgamated, was redesignated as the third battalion of the regiment, with Kumaon Rifles in brackets. Thus, October 27 is observed as Kumaon Day.

    When Kashmir Valley was invaded by Pakistan immediately after the attainment of Independence, Kumaon Regiment rose to the occasion and played a key role in thwarting the large scale infiltration from across the border. Maj Som Nath Sharma's company, battling all odds, did not allow the enemy to capture Srinagar airfield at Badgam. However, he had to lay down his life. Maj Som Nath Sharma, for his gallant action, was honoured with Param Vir Chakra posthumously. In the same vein, Maj Gen KS Thimmaya, the then GOC of 19 Infantry Division, moved tanks across Zojila Pass to chase away the infiltrators.

    A total of 106 jawans out of 111 men of a single company of the Kumaon Regiment died defending 'chusul' against Chinese attack in 1962. The 1962 war saw an active participation of 6 and 13 Kumaon at Walong and Rezang-La in Ladakh. At Rezang-La, 114 other ranks saw action out of whom 106 soldiers laid down their lives. This was a matchless feat in the history of sacrifice of any regiment and it was well recognised the world over. It was here that Maj Shaitan Singh of 13 Kumaon laid down his life in action. He was honoured posthumously with Param Vir Chakra for his exemplary leadership. At Walong, 6 Kumaon led the action against the Chinese. In 1965, the regiment again proved its mettle.

    Four Kumaon, one of the most decorated and oldest battalions of Indian Army, was the first battalion of Army to be presented Colours on April 7, 1961 for its glorious deeds and unique performance, both in peace and war, by the first President of India, late Dr Rajendra Prasad. On October 27, 1970, 14 Battalion of the regiment also received Colours at Ranikhet from the then President, late Mr VV Giri.

    November 1970 was a turning point in the history of the regiment. The Naga Regiment, raised at Ranikhet, was affiliated to the Kumaon Regiment. This was a unique honour. The Kumaon Regiment was selected on the demand of Nagas. It was the Kumaon units which won the hearts and minds of Naga brethren during counter-insurgency operations in 1950s and 60s in North-East. A Scouts Battalion joined the regiment from Border Scouts in 1981 and was designated Kumaon Scouts.

    In 1971 war against Pakistan, battalions of the Kumaon and Naga Regiments played significant role in helping Bangladesh to attain freedom. During operation Blue Star, the regiment won many laurels including two Ashok Chakra (posthumously) by Maj Bhukant Mishra and Nk Nirbhay Singh of 15 Kumaon. The regiment also performed admirably in operation Pawan and won one Uttam Yudh Seva Medal, one Vir Chakra, one Yudh Seva Medal, seven Sena Medals, one Bar to Sena Medal, eight Mentions-in-Despatches, 12 Chief of Army Staff and 7 GOC commendation cards. It was the Kumaonis who were the chosen ones to meet the operational requirements in Siachen Glacier and Bila Fond La during operation Meghadoot.

    In Punjab and Jammu and Kashmir operations, the regiment distinguished again. The third Ashok Chakra of the regiment was won by Sub Sujjan Singh of 13 Kumaon who died while fighting against insurgents in 1994. The fourth Ashoka Chakra was won by Nk Rambeer Singh Tomar of 15 Kumaon who was posted to 26 Rashtriya Rifles in Doda district. The gallant soldiers fought with the same spirit during operation Vijay.

    With a modest beginning, the regiment has grown manifold over the years. It has in its fold Naga and Rashtriya Rifles battalions, Kumaon Scouts, Territorial Army units, a Parachute and Mechanised Infantry unit each, a Naval ship and a tank Regiment.

    Thirteen Kumaon was inducted into the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia-Eritrea (UNMEE) in July 2004. It took over the central sector of Eritrea from 15 Sikh Light Infantry battalion. It remained in the mission area till mid-August 2005. The unit, which earned international fame at Rezang La in Ladakh during 1962 Indo-China war, continues to excel in its overseas mission area. Another noteworthy is the fact that a Kumaon Regiment officer, Maj Gen Rajender Singh, had recently taken over as the new Force Commander of UNMEE which is a matter of pride not only for the Kumaon Regiment but also for the Indian Army and the nation.

    The central sector of Eritrea is the most difficult sector of UNMEE. This sector comprises rugged hills and mountains, some of them as high as 9000 feet. The temperature here rises upto 68° Celsius in summer. With the battalion headquarters along with one company located at Adigrat in Ethiopia, the rest of the battalion occupied various forward posts within and outside the temporary security zone (TSZ) running all along the central sector of the Ethiopia-Eritrea border. This was perhaps the only case in the history of UN peacekeeping where a battalion headquarters was operating from a different country while its troops are deployed in another country.

    The Kumaon Regiment provided a Force Reserve Company (FRC) to cater to various operational, administrative and ceremonial requirements of the UNMEE Force Headquarters (FHQ) which was located at Asmara, capital of Eritrea. The Force Reserve Company, represented by the 'C' or 'Rezang La' company, was co-located with the FHQ. It is independent of INDBATT and comes directly under FHQ. Within 48 hours of arrival in the mission area, the company was launched for a search-and-rescue mission in aid of a missing International Committee of Red Cross (ICRC) representative who was washed away in a flash flood. The company was earmarked to carry out such humanitarian tasks set by FHQ in various contingencies. It also provided personnel for escort duties and ceremonial guards. It had its moment of glory when it was asked to present a guard of honor to the UN Secretary General, Mr Kofi Annan.

    Kumaon Regiment
     
  13. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    ajay the RAI ( regiment of artillery India) is a special regiment as both its Motto and ensignia has remained unchanged

    Regiment of Artillery

    and has allinces with the following artillery regiments

    Royal Regiment of Artillery
    Sri Lanka Artillery
     
  14. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    The Mechanised Infantry Regiment

    The Mechanised Infantry Regiment is an infantry regiment of the Indian Army. It is one of the the youngest regiments in the army, and though it was formed as a result of lessons learned in the 1965 Indo-Pak War, to give infantry battalions greater mobility, it was the mastermind of late Gen K Sundarji who had the foresight to cater the needs of a modern army. Initially, some of the older infantry battalions of various regiments were equipped with armoured personnel carriers. The need for something more concrete and viable was felt along with a need to develop a common philosophy with regards to the type of tactics. This necessitated the raising a totally new arm in the Indian Army, resulting in the various mechanised battalions being brought together under a single cap badge as the Mechanised Infantry Regiment in 1979.

    Gen Sundarji was appointed the first Colonel of the Mechanized Infantry Regiment, the post he held till his retirement.

    battalion roster

    1st Battalion (former 1st Bn, Madras Regiment)
    2nd Battalion (former 1st Bn, Jat Light Infantry)
    3rd Battalion (former 1st Bn, 8 Gorkha Rifles)
    4th Battalion (former 1st Bn, Sikh Regiment)
    5th Battalion (former 14th Bn, Kumaon Regiment)
    6th Battalion (former 1st Bn, Garhwal Rifles)
    7th Battalion (former 1st Bn, Dogra Regiment
    8th Battalion (former 7th Bn, Punjab Regiment)
    9th Battalion (former 7th Bn, The Grenadiers)
    10th Battalion (former 20th Bn, Maratha Light Infantry)
    11th Battalion (former 18th Bn, Rajputana Rifles)
    12th Battalion (former 16th Bn, Mahar Regiment /para bn)
    13th Battalion (former 18th Bn, Rajput Regiment)
    14th Battalion (former 16th Bn, Jammu & Kashmir Rifles)
    24th Battalion (former 20th Bn, Rajput Regiment)
     
  15. prashant2a

    prashant2a Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    3
    ASSAM REGIMENT("ASAM VIKRAM or UNIQUE VALOUR")
    The Assam Regiment is an infantry regiment of the Indian Army. The Regiment consists of 19 battalions; 13 regular units, three Rashtriya Rifles units and three infantry battalions of the Territorial Army. It recruits exclusively from all the Seven Sister States of North-East India.

    The Assam Regiment


    Active 15 June 1941 - Present
    Regimental Centre Happy Valley, Shillong
    Nickname Assam Regiment
    Motto- Asam Vikram (Unique Valour)
    War Cry -Rhino Charge
    March- Badluram Ka Badan
    Mascot- Uni-horned Rhinoceros of Assam
    Engagements 1945(Burma Front) 1971(Chaamb Sector)
    Decorations 1 Ashoka Chakra (Class III), 2 Maha Vir Chakra, 3 Kirti Chakra, 5 Vir Chakras, 14 Shaurya Chakras, 2 Padma Shris, 5 Ati Vishisht Seva Medals, 1 Yudh Seva Medal, 51Sena Medals and 8 Vishisht Seva Medals
    HISTORY
    The Regiment was raised on 15 June 1941 in Shillong by Lt Col Ross Howman to meet the claim of the then undivided State of Assam for its own fighting unit and to counter the threat of the Japanese invasion of India. The young regiment soon proved its capabilities within three years of its raising, at the consecutive battles of Jessami, the epic defence of Kohima and the capture of Aradura, all of which were awarded as Battle Honours (now as Pre-Independence Battle Honours) to the Regiment. The Regiment earned high praise for its combat skills in World War II. After independence, the Regiment gained in strength and its battalions have taken part in all wars and counter-insurgency operations with distinction. It was awarded a Battle Honour for its tenacious defence at Chamb in the 1971 Indo-Pak War.

    Two battalions were part of the Indian Peace Keeping Forces in Sri Lanka in 1988 and a battalion served in Cambodia in 1993 as part of the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia. Three Territorial Army (TA) battalions and three Rashtriya Rifles (RR) battalions are affiliated with the Regiment. The unique cultural and tribal character of the Regiment makes for a fine combination of cheerful, tough and willing soldiery who excel in operations in mountainous and jungle terrain. The Regimental Colours are Black and Gold (State colours of undivided Assam) and Scarlet (the colour of the Infantry). Badges are of Silver and Black. The side arm is the 'Dah'. The Regimental Language is Hindi. When spoken in the regiment, it is a quaint and unique mixture of Hindi generously sprinkled with words from all the Northeast languages and sounds cryptic to the uninitiated.

    BATTALIONS
    1st Battalion
    2nd Battalion - Second to None
    3rd Battalion - The Phantom Third
    4th Battalion - Formidable Fourth
    5th Battalion - Fighting fifth
    6th Battalion - The Sabre Sixth
    7th Battalion - Striking Seventh
    8th Battalion - The Head Hunters
    9th Battalion - The Nimble Ninth
    10th Battalion - The Thundering Tenth
    12th Battalion - Daring Dozen
    14th Battalion - Ferocious Fourteenth
    15th Battalion - One Five
    119 Infantry Battalion(T.A)- Assam Terriers
    165 Infantry Battalion(T.A)- Manipur Terriers
    166 Infantry Battalion(T.A)- Tezpur Terriers
    35th Rashtriya Rifles
    42nd Rashtriya Rifles
    59th Rashtriya Rifles
    By 2006 the regiment had grown into a family of 19 battalions, 13 regular units, three Rashtriya Rifles units and three infantry battalions of the Territorial Army. Comprising exclusively troops from all the seven North-Eastern states, the regiment has established itself as a highly respected infantry regiment of Indian Army. In its six decades of martial history, the regiment has served with distinction in different wars and in various operational areas of the country. It has also been a part of the Indian Peace Keeping Force (IPKF) in Sri Lanka and UN Peace Keeping Force in Cambodia. The regiment has won seven battle honours, three theatre honours, six exclusive unit citations and several gallantry awards. The 42nd Rashtriya Rifles (Assam) formed specially to combat insurgency and terrorism, came into existence at a simple inaugural ceremony at the Assam Regimental Centre, Happy Valley in Shillong.
    The Phantom Third recently celebrated its Diamond Jubliee. The Sabre Sixth has been selected for Ceremonial Duties at Rashtrapati Bhawan for its outstanding work in Counter Terrorist operations. The contingent of the Assam Regiment has won the award for the "Best Marching Contingent" twice in the republic day celebrations held at Delhi in 1995 and 2004. The team of the Assam Regimental Centre won the 'Army Young Blood Firing Championship' in 2005 and stood second in 2006.

    The Ferocious Fourteenth has won the Division and Command Football Championships and has fielded four players for the Army Red's & Green's. It has also bagged the first position in the Division Cambrian Patrol Championship 2009 -10 & will be fielding its patrol in the Command Championships later in the year.
     
  16. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,563
    Likes Received:
    16
    THE GRENADIERS REGIMENT

    Regimental Centre: Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh.

    Regimental Insignia: A brass grenade bearing the White Horse of Hanover. The insignia is worn on the uniform with a white hackle.

    Motto: Sarvada Shaktishali (Ever Powerful).

    War Cry: Same as Regimental Motto.



    history

    Grenadier companies of Bombay Sepoys were part of the British India Army and won the battle of Talegaon against the Marathas in 1778. By 1784 the Grenadier companies had been given the title of Bombay Grenadiers and later became the 1st Grenadier regiment in 1796. In 1903 they were renumbered as the 101st Grenadiers and went on to serve on several fronts during both World War I and World War II. In 1945 the regiment was redesignated The Indian Grenadiers and assigned to India as the country was partitioned by the departing British.

    The 1st Grenadiers were transferred to the Brigade of Guards in 1950 and a parachute regiment was raised in 1952. Today the Indian Army sports 19 regular battallions of Grenadier troops. The regiment has seen combat service with the Indian Army, including the wars against Pakistan in 1965 and 1971. The Grenadiers played an important role in the Kargil War of 1999 against Pakistani military personnel that occupied Indian territory. Their gallantry was displayed during the battles of Tololing, Point 4590, the Three Pimples and most significantly in their historic re-capture of Tiger Hill on the night of July 3-4, 1999

    Current battalions of the Indian Grenadiers


    2nd Battalion (102nd KEO Grenadiers)
    3rd Battalion (108th Infantry)
    4th Battalion (109th Infantry)
    5th Battalion (112th Infantry)
    6th Battalion
    8th Battalion
    9th Battalion (ex-State Forces unit)
    11th Battalion (ex-Territorial battalion)
    12th Battalion
    13th Battalion
    14th Battalion
    15th Battalion
    16th Battalion
    17th Battalion
    18th Battalion
    19th Battalion
    20th Battalion
    21st Battalion
    22nd Battalion
     
  17. Zoravar

    Zoravar Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    43
    Sikh regiment-(copy paste from wikipedia)
    Brief history

    Maharaja Ranjit Singh brought the well built and courageous people, of the then Punjab, and other martial tribes and formed "Khalsa Army". Following numerous heroic and valiant battles by the Khalsa Army, XIV Ferozepur (1 Sikh, now 4 Mechanised Infantry), and XV Ludhiana (2 Sikh) were raised from the soldiers of the vanquished force on August 1, 1846.

    The Sikh Regiment came into existence on 1 August 1846, with the raising of Regiment of Ferozepore Sikhs and Regiment of Ludhiana Sikhs by Captain G. Tebbs and Lieutenant Colonel P. Gordon respectively and were used in great effect in the 1857 Indian Rebellion. The outcomes were extremely beneficial for the Sikhs, as their loyalty and fighting tenacity made them the backbone of recruitment for the British Indian Army. In this campaign the Sikhs were awarded their first two battle honours for operations conducted at the seige of Lucknow and the defence of Arrah. In addition the Sikh Regiment were awarded a one rank seniority over other Indian Sepoys and awarded the authorisation to wear the converted red turban (which is still worn by the regiment today) opposed to the standard blue head dress worn by British Indian Army Units at the time. The Sikh Regiment was further used as a vanguard unit for the British Empire being used to garrison India internally, protect Indian frontiers (such as the North West Frontier Provience) and to serve in over seas deployments such as operations in Hong Kong. By 1914 Sikh Regiments were deployed as part of the British Indian Army for operations in World War I. The Regiment served in all theatres of operations and earning 28 battle honours.

    In 1931 Adolf Hitler had seen the strength of the Sikh regiment in the war of France. Hitler had given a speech for the Sikhs to join the Nazis, but most of regiment had kept their loyalty towards the British because the empire had always given large amounts of land, money, and provided them to stay in other countries.

    Sikhs make up 10–15% of all ranks in the Indian Army and 20% of its officers,[58] whilst Sikhs only forming 1.87% of the Indian population, which makes them over 10 times more likely to be a soldier and officer in the Indian Army than the average Indian.[59] The Sikh Regiment is one of the highest decorated regiment of the Indian Army,[60] with 73 Battle Honours, 14 Victoria Crosses,[61] 21 first class Indian Order of Merit (equivalent to the Victoria Cross),[62] 15 Theatre Honours and 5 COAS Unit Citations besides 2 Param Vir Chakras, 14 Maha Vir Chakras, 5 Kirti Chakras, 67 Vir Chakras and 1596 other gallantry awards.The highest-ranking General in the history of the Indian Air Force is a Punjabi Sikh Marshal of the Air Force Arjan Singh.[63] Advanced plans by the MOD to raise an Infantry UK Sikh Regiment were scrapped in June 2007 to the disappointment of the UK Sikh community and Prince Charles of Britain.[64]
     
  18. Zoravar

    Zoravar Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    43
    Awards(from wikipedia)-
    Awards and citations

    The Museum of the Regimental Centre displays a record of the Sikh Regiment in four halls viz.,

    * The Religious/motivational Hall,
    * The Hall of Heritage,
    * The Regimental Glory Hall
    * The Peripheral Gallery.

    The Chief of Army Staff (COAS) made a special instant award of "Unit Citation" to 8th Battalion, The Sikh Regiment for their meritorious and gallant performance during the isolation of Tiger Hill, which facilitated the capture of Tiger Hill top and battles of Helmet and India Gate, features to the West of Tiger Hill top, on night 07/8 July 1999, in Dras Sector.

    During Operation Vijay, the unit displayed sterling performance marked with exceptional valour and grit in the face of the enemy.

    In all, the Regiment has to its credit 1652 gallantry awards and honours including

    * 2 Param Vir Chakra
    Lance Naik Karam Singh in 1948 during Kashmir operations.
    Subedar Joginder Singh during the Sino-Indian War of 1962.
    * 14 Maha Vir Chakra (MVC)
    * 68 Vir Chakra.
    * 14 Victoria Crosses

    In addition it has also earned :

    * 73 battle honours
    * 38 theatre honours besides four COAS Unit Citation, including
    the one bestowed upon 8 Sikh during the 1999 Kargil episode
    and two "Bravest of the Brave" citations.
     
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,517
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Check Bharat Rakshak main forum
     

Share This Page