India ahead of China in quality of scientific papers

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by trackwhack, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. trackwhack

    trackwhack Tihar Jail Banned

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    http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2778366.ece

    N
    eutral Source. Not some Beurocrat talking nonsense. This is the value of Doing it ourselves against reverse engineering.

    It is steadily gaining in global leadership in research areas, says study

    India is well ahead of China in the quality of its scientific papers, though it lags in growth in the number of papers, a study has revealed.The quality of papers is determined by the number of citations per article, and this has gone by 2 to 2.7 over the past five years for papers from Indian scientists, says the study done by Elsevier, a world-leader in medical and scientific publications. On the other hand, articles from Chinese scientists are found to have a citation factor of 2.2.Michiel Kolman, senior vice-president of Elsevier in charge of global academic relations, said the company's database also showed that India was steadily gaining global leadership in different research areas. An analysis of research leadership areas from 2006 to 2010 showed that India was a global leader in 159 research areas, against 130 for the previous five years.Noting that “India is a science powerhouse in the making,” Dr. Kolman said the study had also shown that India had the greatest strength in chemistry: 38 per cent of articles in India's 159 leadership areas fell under the broad category of chemistry. This was followed by engineering (15 per cent), biology and biotechnology (14 per cent), mathematics and physics (10 per cent), computer science (5 per cent) and medical science (4 per cent).[FONT=Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif]Dr. Kolman said Elsevier's database showed that the current growth in the scientific articles from India came typically from universities rather than scientific institutions.


    I cant wait for the day when Indians who received high quality subsidized education in our country and ran away for 6 digit dollar paychecks giving lame excuses like no research facilities in India have their hands buried in shame. The day is not far. Give it 10-15 years.

    China is nearly on par economically and on the money spent on State sponsored R&D when compared to the US. India is nowhere. Imagine in 10 years when India has the same kind of spending power that China has now. Cant wait for us to start work on that Neutrino Observatory. :) :)

    2012 sure seems to have started on a good note so far. Finger crossed.

     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
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  3. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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  4. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

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    I agree with low quality of research paper are ruining the nation's reputation in Academic field. The problem come from system itself. Most scientific investment in China is State-own laboratory and universities. Private company often time chase only after short-term profit so they do not invest in R&D. I do believe that is due to the sense of insecurity among wealthy in China, one day the government is unhappy with you and take away your company. So many private business owner want to reserve the capital in much more liquid form.

    State-own laboratory under not much pressure for profit, promote scientist on the basis of scientific paper publication...
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  5. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Never realised a tabloid newspaper is neutral.:lol:

    The quality of papers is determined by the number of citations per article, and this has gone by 2 to 2.7 over the past five years for papers from Indian scientists, says the study done by Elsevier, a world-leader in medical and scientific publications. On the other hand, articles from Chinese scientists are found to have a citation factor of 2.2.

    People are jumping up and down because that? 2.7-2,2=0,5
    :rofl:

    Not to mention citations are influenced by what field people publish in. Some people just cant see past the 0,5. :lol:

    I see no need to derail the thread. Just a simple question. The article mentioned the improvment in Indian citations from 2 to 2,7.
    What about the chinese? Do we know how they stood five years ago?

    I will very much have the original article instead of second source materials.

    I also noticed this:
    though it lags in growth in the number of papers.

    ANyway this is from The Telegraph. Gives a more balanced view.

    99th Indian Science Congress discusses “India – A Scientific Super Power to be?”


    Press Releases


    99th Indian Science Congress discusses “India – A Scientific Super Power to be?”

    05-01-2012 02:00 PM
    BHUBANESWAR, ORISSA, INDIA


    “India – A Scientific Super Power to be? ” Dr. Michiel Kolman , Senior Vice President , Elsevier, raised this thought-provoking question in his presentation on India’s research performance over the last five years at the 99th Indian Science Congress. India retains its position in the top 10 nations worldwide and also shows an impressive growth of 14.3% which is exceeded only by China with 22.8% among the top 10 nations.

    “India is a science powerhouse in the making, as reflected by its enormous growth. It does have a fierce competitor in China, which has an even higher growth, but India scores higher in terms of quality” stated Dr. Kolman.


    The quality of the publications is determined by the citations per article, based on data in Elsevier’s SciVerse Scopus database. This quality has been rising over the past 5 years (2.0 to 2.7 citations per article) outperforming China (2.2) but still below the larger science nations such as the UK and the US which are at 6 while Japan is at 4 citations per article.

    One of the new metrics, developed as part of Elsevier’s SciVal Spotlight research performance measurement tool, quantifies and visualises research leadership areas; these are research areas where India is outperforming other nations. Based on 2006-2010 Scopus data, India has 159 research leadership areas, which is substantially higher than last year’s analysis of 130, which was based on 2005-2009 data. However the same metrics shows 885 research leadership areas for China for 2006-2010.

    Overall, India publishes most in chemistry (20%), engineering (13%), biology & biotechnology (12%), math & physics (11%), medical (11%) and computer science (11%). India’s “leadership articles” - articles in the 159 leadership areas as determined by SciVal Spotlight - are dominated by chemistry at an impressive 38% contribution. Other key areas are engineering (15%), biology & biotechnology (14%), math & physics (10%), while there are only 5% leadership articles in computer science and 4% in medical. China shows the same strong leadership in computer science that India shows in chemistry. (WTF? LOL)

    SciVal Spotlight not only provides insight into the research performance of India as a country, it also shows the relative performance of individual institutes. The key players in India, as measured in research output, are science institutes: the Top 10 is led by the Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, followed by IITs, CSIRs, and the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Currently article growth comes typically from universities rather than from the science institutes, so the biggest players are not ones with the highest growth rates.

    On the aspect of international collaboration, Dr. Kolman pointed to Scopus data that outlined that, globally, the share of articles with international co-authors is rising. For Indian research, this share is decreasing over time. This may imply that Indian authors are now relatively more inclined to collaborate with other Indian authors rather than scientists from other countries. It is noteworthy that these papers from India with non-Indian co-authors receive 80% more citations than papers with only Indian authors.

    About SciVerse Scopus

    Covering the world's research literature, SciVerse Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature and quality Web sources with smart tools to track analyze and visualize research. SciVerse Scopus was designed and developed with over 500 users and librarians internationally. Its unique database contains abstracts and references from nearly19,500 peer-reviewed journals from more than 5,000 publishers worldwide, ensuring broad interdisciplinary coverage. In addition, SciVerse Scopus not only offers users citation information about the articles covered, but also directly integrates Web and patent searches. Direct links to full-text articles, library resources and other applications like reference management software, make SciVerse Scopus quicker, easier and more comprehensive to use than any other literature research tool.

    About SciVal Spotlight and the Elsevier SciVal suite

    SciVal Spotlight is a strategic tool that generates unique institutional and country maps of existing and emerging research strengths based on an interdisciplinary perspective of current performance. The tool is part of a broader range of research measurement tools, the SciVal Suite. Elsevier’s SciVal suite of services supports academic and government leadership in evaluating, establishing and executing research strategies that optimize the performance of existing assets and maximize investments to enhance near and long-term productivity. SciVal tools leverage Scopus data, Elsevier’s trusted source of bibliometric data, to offer innovative yet authoritative solutions. Besides SciVal Spotlight, current suite offerings include: SciVal Funding, an online solution that provides targeted recommendations on grants to pursue based on pre-populated research profiles and historical awards; SciVal Strata, a web-based research performance tool that offers users the flexibility to construct relevant contextual data to evaluate research teams or individual researchers, using a range of indicators based on Scopus data; SciVal Experts, a semantic technology-based application that enables researchers to identify and locate sources of expertise at an individual or departmental level within and across institutions.

    To view the photograph, please click on the link given below:
    Dr. Michiel Kolman




    Notice that the number of citations of US and Japan. Some people can only see the 0,5 and jumping up and down on this.I see the distance between China/India and the west.

    Some people just cant see beyond the end of ones nose.




     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
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  6. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^^ Yes I agree, the only neutral sources of information are those which are under direct control of CCP.
    Did not know that The Hindu is a tabloid newspaper, thanks for such important piece of information.
     
  7. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

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    Japan and the West represent the highest productivity in the world, there is a huge gap between China and United States or even Japan. The gap will not be closed in the next 10 yrs. However, as China invest more into technological research, the gap will be closer and closer. In the respect of commitment to close the gap, China have much more financial resource at hand then their Indian counter part. China have always admit the gap between China and West in this regard from what I see in major media outlet of China such as sina.com.cn, ifeng.com or qq.com.

    There is just this very nature of thing that can not be change. India's GDP(exchange rate) size is about only 1/4 of China.
    Chinese GDP is the following according to CIA World Factbook.

    [TABLE="width: 638, align: left"]
    [TR="class: eas_light"]
    [TD="width: 390"]GDP (official exchange rate):
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: right"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]$5.878 trillion
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]



    [TABLE="width: 638, align: left"]
    [TR="class: eas_light"]
    [TD="width: 390"]GDP (purchasing power parity):
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: right"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]$10.09 trillion (2010 est.)
    country comparison to the world: 3$9.144 trillion (2009 est.)
    $8.374 trillion (2008 est.)
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]







    India's GDP is the following according CIA World Factbook:
    [TABLE="width: 638, align: left"]
    [TR="class: sas_light"]
    [TD="width: 390"]GDP (purchasing power parity):
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: right"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]$4.06 trillion (2010 est.)
    country comparison to the world: 5$3.679 trillion (2009 est.)
    $3.447 trillion (2008 est.)
    note: data are in 2010 US dollars
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR="class: sas_light"]
    [TD="width: 390"]GDP (official exchange rate):
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: right"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"]$1.538 trillion (2010 est.)
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]












    According to this data, even purchasing power aspect of India's GDP is about only 4/10 of China.
     
  8. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    DId not know that The Telegraph is under direct control of CCP. Thanks for such important piece of information.
     

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