In China, people criticise govt for targeting prostitutes

Discussion in 'China' started by happy, Feb 22, 2014.

  1. happy

    happy Senior Member Senior Member

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    At some point in the last week, Chinese President Xi Jinping must have asked himself, "Since when do the Chinese people have more sympathy for prostitutes than for the government?" It's a reasonable question. Nine days ago Chinese authorities dispatched more than 6,000 police officers to raid the more than 3,000 businesses that constitute the notorious, wholly illegal $8 billion sex trade in Dongguan, a southern Chinese manufacturing hub. Illicit sex on that scale cannot exist without official complicity, greased by payoffs. Xi no doubt assumed that Chinese citizens would thus get behind this latest offensive in the broader battle he's launched against official corruption.

    Yet in the immediate aftermath of the Dongguan raids and the stateproduced television expose that supposedly inspired them, ordinary Chinese have reacted with far less enthusiasm than they have to Xi's clampdown on the banquets and other extravagances enjoyed by China's bureaucrats. That's putting it mildly: The government and CCTV — the state-owned network that aired the expose — have in fact been subjected to nine days of abuse, contempt and ridicule by online Chinese.

    The most visible outrage has emerged on the Sina Weibo microblogging service, where the hashtag #DongguanHangInThere became the No. 1 trending topic within 24 hours of the raids. The desire to see Dongguan "hang in there," of course, has less to do with supporting the sex trade than with anger at the official hypocrisy behind raids that target working women but not the officials getting rich off the massive industry.

    "Does even one of those prostitutes come from a rich family or from parents who are officials? No.

    They are born to poor families," wrote a Shanghai-based Sina Weibo user, invoking a class divide that's emerged as a main criticism of the crackdown."In a nation where people sell their souls for wealth," she continues. "Can't we bear a little sympathy for those selling their bodies?" Not only microbloggers, in a Feb. 11 editorial unusual for its indirect criticism of state-owned CCTV's coverage, The Beijing News, an influential, state-run newspaper, also expressed discomfort with the focus on sex workers.

    The reasons for the massive crackdown remain murky. No doubt a desire to break up the corruption that allowed the city of Dongguan to become home to 500,000 prostitutes was one of them. Nonetheless, Xi and his advisors can't be pleased that a high-level crackdown on vice — surely intended to have populist appeal — is instead being seen as yet another high-handed campaign targeting humble citizens.

    On Feb. 11, in the midst of the initial furor over the initial crackdown, China's Central Propaganda even had to send out the following guidelines, as obtained and reported by China Digital Times, an independent website hosted at the University of California at Berkeley:

    "To all media: concerning Dongguan, do not oppose CCTV's report, and do not deviate from the spirit of the central government; clearly support CCTV and the government in their crackdown." These guidelines were accompanied by an effort to censor some of the most inflammatory microblogging that had appeared in the wake of the CCTV report. For example, as also reported by China Digital Times, the following Sina Weibo post was deleted from the site, along with many others:

    "[A Few Dissatisfactions with the Dongguan Anti-Prostitution Campaign] 1. Local leaders are dissatisfied, as you've made them lose face; 2. The government is dissatisfied, as you've diluted their tax base; 3. The police are dissatisfied, as you've lessened their protection fees."

    The effort to censor and control the response to the crackdown is startling in part because the Chinese government has expended — some would say successfully — considerable effort to neuter the once-thriving Sina Weibo of its ability to drive opinion contrary to the Chinese government's will. Thus, the fact that "#DongguanHangInThere" emerged so quickly, and so powerfully, suggests that the government — or at least its propaganda apparatus — wasn't prepared for a negative reaction.

    Indeed, it wasn't until Feb. 15, and an editorial in People's Daily, the Communist Party's official mouthpiece, that the government went on the offensive, blaming the blowback on "Big Vs," the nickname for some of the Chinese Internet's most followed and influential microbloggers. This is nothing new: Last fall, the Big Vs were subjected to a prolonged Chinese propaganda offensive that culminated in one of them — US citizen Charles Xue — being arrested and accused of for cavorting with a prostitute.

    Xue's name hasn't specifically been invoked yet, but the message couldn't be much clearer: Those who oppose the Chinese government's sincere initiative to combat prostitution, no matter their reasons, are misguided and depraved. That's likely not a message Xi Jinping thought he'd have to broadcast. But no doubt he agrees heartily with the sentiment.

    Read more at:
    In China, people criticise govt for targeting prostitutes - The Economic Times
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The Chinese Govt has done the right thing, in a moral sense. to curb prostitution.

    However, the Weibo chaps are right that it is the poor who are in the career of prostitution and not the rich and the officials, who get rich through act that are worse than prostitution.

    Therefore, maybe the Govt should also plan their rehabilitation so that they are not economically disadvantaged.
     
  4. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    This is the biggest fear of the Chinese CPC......as people become more exposed to the outside world and read more and watch what is happening around the world......they just get better at spotting official government condescension that assumes that the general public is not sophisticated enough to see the difference between real reform and populist window-dressing.

    China is slowly evolving into a country where the people no longer believe in most of what comes out of the official news media or the CPC ruling elite, even if it comes straight from the mouth of Xi Jinping.

    People are beginning to see thru the bullshit, and this scares the shit out of the ruling elite.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014
    chase, Ray and happy like this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The more China gets exposed and opened up to a capitalist form of life, the greater will be the desire to be independent of the Govt and its slave driving tendencies.

    Likewise, the divide between the have and have nots will increase, as would greed, nepotism and corruption.

    The US has moved in the right direction with alacrity, once Deng moved China towards capitalism, by exposing China to the superficial, the cosmetic and consumer driven trappings of US capitalism and waste economy..

    The sudden change from monastic mindset encouraged by Mao style Communism to the sudden exposure to US style wheeling dealing consumerism and capitalism is proving the end of China, as it is floundering to handle the exposure with care.

    The US plan is catching its root.

    Anew revolution is on the way!
     
  6. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Targeting prostitutes? What a shallow observation! It's a pity that you people swallow whatever the media feeds you.

    And who are we refering to exactly by making up a sensational title of this kind? What kind of people is criticizing the government over this anti-prostitution campaign? Those who enjoy the sex service must have voiced their anger, not in vain, they were heard here.

    What about supports showed by the wives, whose husbands travel a lot to Dongguan for business. Selectively blinding?

    This high profile anti-prostitution campaign is just the fore play of the following anti-corruption movement, the goal is to overhaul Chinese judicial system, creating one that is independent from the local government and has the power to regulate the latter.

    We all know that CCP had an very important meeting last year, many meaningful decisions were made during the meeting, which encompass coming reforms in many different aspects, including the loosening family planning policy, that one was thoroughly discussed here.

    However, another important decision is to reform the low efficient judicial system which in the past for many reasons could be easily influenced by local governments hence fails to fulfill its oversight duty over misbehaving local officials, creating social disturbances that worried CCP. The reform is focusing on detaching the court and procuratorate from the governments at a local level, giving them independent finance and personnels and enabling them to challenge the local governments.

    But the reform is bound to meet resistances from vested interest groups, both outside and inside the party. The open criticism of the anti-prostitution campaign has shown how strong the resistance from the outside could be.

    People's Daily wrote a masterpiece asking why prostitution in Dongguan was so rampant, in which it blatantly pointed out the local law enforcement departments were protecting the business and needed to be cleaned. After the article was published, the vice mayor who was in charge of police department was sacked.

    But that is not the end of story, it's just the beginning of an inside cleaning process, which in my opinion will lead to the old chap Zhou Yongkang, who was once overseeing the judicial and law enforcement departments and could be the main obstacle to Xi's reform.

    Zhou was rumored to be secretly regulated, the public report of the arrest of his son could be taken as a sign of Zhou's decline.

    Sent from my HUAWEI T8951 using Tapatalk 2
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2014
  7. happy

    happy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Blah blah blah.....soon china will have a campaign for a purging the people of mixed ethnics to have a pure blood strain on the lines of the Nazis.
     
  8. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    That is your argument?

    It is a pity that diligent Internet warriors like Ray are getting old, leaving us with lazy and incompetent juniors like you. You lowering the taste of this forum.

    Sent from my HUAWEI T8951 using Tapatalk 2
     
  9. happy

    happy Senior Member Senior Member

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