Global cluster bomb ban comes into force.!

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by bhramos, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    A new global treaty banning cluster munitions has come into force.

    [​IMG]
    The Convention on Cluster Munitions bans the stockpiling, use and transfer of virtually all existing cluster bombs, and also provides for the clearing up of unexploded munitions.

    It has been adopted by 108 states, of which 38 have ratified it.

    First developed during World War II, cluster bombs contain a number of smaller bomblets designed to cover a large area and deter an advancing army.

    Campaigners have hailed the treaty as the most significant disarmament and humanitarian treaty for a decade.

    "This is a triumph of humanitarian values over a cruel and unjust weapon," Thomas Nash, co-ordinator of the Cluster Munition Coalition (CMC), told the BBC.

    "At a time when concern over civilian deaths in conflict is in the news, this treaty stands out as a clear example of what governments must do to protect civilians and redress the harm already caused by cluster bombs."

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    UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: "This new instrument is a major advance for the global disarmament and humanitarian agendas, and will help us to counter the widespread insecurity and suffering caused by these terrible weapons, particularly among civilians and children."

    The agreement "highlights not only the world's collective revulsion at these abhorrent weapons, but also the power of collaboration among governments, civil society and the United Nations to change attitudes and policies on a threat faced by all humankind," Mr Ban said.

    Civilian victims
    Cluster munitions are weapons dropped by aircraft or fired from the ground, which release submunitions or "bomblets" over a wide area.


    Archive footage of cluster bombs being dropped
    If the shrapnel-filled bomblets fail to detonate on impact they can remain active for years. Some are unusually shaped or brightly coloured, making them attractive to children.

    Continue reading the main story
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    Lebanon was the turning point - it was the international outcry in 2006 that prompted the Norwegian government to start the negotiation process”

    Jeff Abramson
    Arms Control Association
    The charity Handicap International estimates that 98% of cluster bomb victims are civilians and nearly one-third are children.

    "The main problem with cluster bombs is that they kill too many civilians," says Mr Nash.

    "They don't discriminate between soldiers and civilians in populated areas and so many of them remain unexploded after an attack that they contaminate areas and kill and injure civilians for years.

    "They're one of the worst conventional weapons in the world today."

    The Convention on Cluster Munitions prohibits the production, use, stockpiling and transfer of the weapons.

    It sets deadlines for the destruction of stockpiles and the clearance of contaminated land.

    Significantly, it also requires countries affected by cluster bombs to help victims of the weapons.

    The campaign to ban cluster munitions gained momentum after the 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon.


    Israel is believed to have dropped 4m bomblets onto southern Lebanon in the last days of the war
    The UN estimates that Israel dropped 4m bomblets onto southern Lebanon during the last three days of the war, when a ceasefire had already been agreed.

    Israel insists its use of cluster munitions in Lebanon was in accordance with international humanitarian law and says most were fired at open and uninhabited areas used by Hezbollah fighters.

    "Lebanon was the turning point," says Jeff Abramson from the Arms Control Association, an advocacy group based in Washington.

    "It was the international outcry in 2006 that prompted the Norwegian government to start the negotiation process that has led to this new treaty."

    US resistance
    But many of the world's major military powers - including the US, Russia and China - are not signatories to the treaty.

    The US administration insists cluster munitions are "legitimate weapons" with "clear military utility in combat".

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    This treaty will create a new norm - it will stigmatise the weapons”

    Thomas Nash
    Cluster Munition Coalition
    It argues that cluster munitions actually cause less harm to civilians than some other weapons.

    The US is taking steps to ensure that any cluster munitions used after 2018 have a failure rate of less than 1%.

    Despite the absence of important military nations, campaigners believe the Convention on Cluster Munitions will make the use of the weapons unacceptable in future conflicts.

    "It's instructive to look at the 1997 Ottawa Treaty banning anti-personnel landmines," says the Head of Oxfam's Control Arms Campaign, Anna MacDonald.

    "The United States didn't sign up to that either but it hasn't produced or used landmines since the treaty came into force."

    "This treaty will create a new norm - it will stigmatise the weapons," agrees Mr Nash.

    "Twenty-two out of the 28 countries in Nato, including the UK, have joined up to this ban. Practically, morally and in some cases legally it's going to be extremely difficult for any country to even contemplate using cluster munitions in future."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-10829976

    Did India get CBU-105?
    if yes, is there any restrictions to use it?
    If No, who will sell us these bombs?
     
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  3. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    India to get smartest cluster bomb CBU-105???



    Is this just a dream now???
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    India didnt sign it...

    India shuns treaty banning deadly cluster bombs


    A landmark treaty banning cluster munitions will come into force from August 1, the United Nations announced, but all major powers, the US, China, Russia Israel and India are shunning it.

    The convention on cluster munitions will enter into force on August 1, 2010, the UN said, with Secretary General Ban-Ki-moon commenting that the new instrument will be a major advance for global disarmament and humanitarian agenda.

    Cluster munitions were first used in Second World War. Cluster bombs are a conglomeration of weapons. When released from an aircraft, they splinter into hundreds, even thousands, of individual 'bomblets'.

    These land over a large geographic area. The technique is also called carpet-bombing. All bomblets don't explode when they hit the ground. But they can go off later.The convention has been signed by 107 states and enters into force six months after 37 countries ratified the treaty, which was concluded in 2008.

    The instrument needed to be ratified by 30 countries to come into force.

    That benchmark was reached in February when Burkina Faso and Moldova both submitted their instruments of ratification of the Convention on Cluster Munitions at UN Headquarters in New York.

    Cluster bombs are both air dropped and used by artillery guns, and the shells open before impact and scatter hundreds of shrapnel causing widespread casualties over a wide area.Many of these munition fail to explode and lie dormant for years killing or maiming hundreds of civilians, long after the conflicts have ended.

    Most of the victims of such bombs have been children in South East Asia, South Asia, the Balkans and south southern Lebanon.

    From Asia only five countries -- Afghanistan, Indonesia, Japan, Laos and Philippines -- are the signatories.

    But what effect the ban would have as all the major powers, including the United States and Israel, which are known to have huge stockpiles estimated at one billion bomblets, have so far rejected the treaty.The signatories include some prominent producer nations like Britain, Germany and France, whose forces are currently involved in Afghanistan.

    Welcoming the treaty coming into force, Ban said in a statement: "this new instrument is a major advance for global disarmament and humanitarian agendas, and will help us to counter the widespread insecurity and suffering caused by these terrible weapons particularly among civilians and children".

    Noting that the convention comes into force a little more than two years since its adoption in Dublin, Ireland, Ban said: "It highlights not only the worlds collective revulsion at these abhorrent weapons, but also the power of collaboration among governments, civil society and the United Nations to change attitudes and policies on a threat faced by all humankind." The convention contains obligations to stop stockpiling, destroy current stock and ban its use.

    The first meeting of States parties to the convention will be held this November in Laos, which the UN chief described as a country "that has suffered tremendously from the impact of cluster munitions."

    "I encourage all Member States to participate in this meeting to demonstrate their support for the Convention," Ban said.

    "And I call on those States which have yet to accede to the Convention, to do so without delay."
     
  5. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    @ ajtr
    my question is that will India get CBU-105 or any cluster bombs in near future?
    or else just to depend on DRDO for it!!!
     
  6. Agantrope

    Agantrope Senior Member Senior Member

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    India already poses the CBU-105SFW

    http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/dumb/cbu-97.htm

    India will never accept this treaty as this is the major anti-armoury present in the Armed forces kitty. No matter what we wont accept and ratify this treaty
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    This treaty would never be accepted because it also impacts our Smerches.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2010
  8. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  9. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Cluster Bomb Ban Takes Effect Minus Support of Major Producers

    A landmark treaty banning cluster bombs became binding international law Sunday. The Convention on Cluster Munitions prohibits signatory countries from using, producing or transferring the weapons, which scatter hundreds of small bomblets over a wide area.

    [​IMG]

    The scattered ordnance can remain armed for years and often wounds civilians long after conflicts end.The treaty has been signed by 107 nations, and 37 of those have ratified the document, including Britain, France, Germany and Japan. However, major cluster bomb-producing nations, including China, the United States, Israel and Russia do not support the accord, arguing the munitions have legitimate military uses.

    Still, aid groups say the treaty is an important step in stopping a weapon they say has caused tremendous suffering to civilians. The treaty requires signatory nations to destroy stockpiled cluster munitions within eight years and to clear contaminated areas within a decade.

    Pope Benedict, speaking Sunday outside Rome, hailed the treaty, calling it an "encouraging sign" that nations can make progress toward disarmament and improved human rights.

    Source
     
  10. VersusAllOdds

    VersusAllOdds Regular Member

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    I don't believe cluster bombs have any justified military use whatsoever. The only use they can have is destroying civilian population and everything that comes with it. These things are as bad as napalm.
     

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