Exploring UAVs and unconventional options for Siachen

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Virendra, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    India's hold on Siachen is a national compulsion, military challenge and a logistical nightmare.
    I'm starting this thread to discuss primarily the UAV possibilities and potential candidates, specialized for Siachen.

    Lets us start with a few facts:
    Altitude - Siachen stands at 5400 metres i.e. 17,720 feet above sea level.
    Co-ordinates - 35°25′16″N 77°06′34″E / 35.421226°N 77.109540°E in East Karakoram, northwest of point NJ9842.
    Positions - The Indian Army controls a few of the top-most heights, holding on to the tactical advantage of high ground, however with Pakistani forces in control of Gyong La pass, Indian access to K-2 and other surrounding peaks has been blocked effectively and mountaineering expeditions to these peaks continue to go through with the approval of the Government of Pakistan. The situation is as such that Pakistanis cannot get up to the glacier, while the Indians cannot come down. Presently India holds two-thirds of the glacier and commands two of the three passes including the highest motorable pass – Khardungla Pass. Pakistan controls Gyong La pass that overlooks the Shyok and Nubra river Valley and India`s access to Leh district.
    Supply - India uses indigenous helicopters such as Cheetah, Chetak and after success trial landing of 2015 the HAL LCH is expected to join the league soon. Sonam post the subject of recent avalanche, is the world's highest helipad. Pakistan on the other hand has built roads and unfurnished paths to almost all of its positions around the glacier.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     
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  3. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Given the altitude and terrain, one area of exploration is rotor less vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) drones.

    Israel has developed a rescue-evacuation purpose VTOL drone that doesn't have any exposed rotors.
    The Urban Aeronautics AirMule was formerly known as Air Mule or Mule. Israel Defense Forces (IDF) codenamed it- Pereira.
    It is an unmanned flying car UAS designed by Rafi Yoeli and built by Tactical Robotics LTD.
    The manufacturer is a subsidiary of Urban Aeronautics LTD. in Yavne, Israel
    Airmule can fly up to 12000 feet above sea level.
    It can carry a payload of up to 1088 pounds. It can fly at a maximum speed of 185 km/h.
    Its endurance (in all variants) ranges from 2 to 4 hours.
     
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  4. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    IAF was able to land heavy MI 26 in 1987 and if Chinook gets into service it could trasnsport small band of troops and light artillery.

    Ka 226 will replace Chetak as per the deal signed, Govt should also negotiate US to buy VTOL osprey.
     
  5. Sakal Gharelu Ustad

    Sakal Gharelu Ustad Detests Jholawalas Moderator

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    The entire glacier is not 5400 metres. The snout is around 3500m.
     
  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    UCAV would be better predator or Rustom . But I don't think it can replace soldiers in anyway.
     
  7. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    I think in an environment as harsh and militarized as Siachen, UAVs of all kinds would suit supportive role only. No question of replacing the men in uniform.
    But the same environment also highlights the need & importance of such logistical support, if we've to mitigate the risks our soldiers face and perhaps reduce the casualties too.
    I feel that whoever we consider (Osprey/Airmule), a complete and accurate addressing of our requirements won't be possible.
    Nobody else has Siachen, our military needs in that way a very peculiar and unique. To have overshot our targets in terms of acquired capability and budget would also be unwise.

    So either we'll build something for ourselves from scratch, or have to partner with someone and tweak an existing technology that falls closest to our parameters.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     

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