Coup in China??

Discussion in 'China' started by Aayush, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. Aayush

    Aayush Regular Member

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    Vishwarupa likes this.
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  3. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    yes...there r rumors.....1st from falun gong websites...some ve been proved wrong but some still seem to be unlcear.
     
  4. Vishwarupa

    Vishwarupa Senior Member Senior Member

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  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Why should there be a coup in China?

    They are very happy as people as the Chinese poster here say and very contented.

    In fact, there are no poor people, hunger, disease or anything that is normally negative.

    All are doing well and there is no strife or political problems.

    So, can there be a coup?

    However, the Washington Post does appear to be serious about the issue.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Chinese Coup Rumors Run Wild Online, Then Disappear: Adam Minter

    These are strange days for China’s netizens. On March 15, the Chinese Communist Party relieved Bo Xilai, the Chongqing Party Secretary, of his duties after his police chief allegedly attempted to seek asylum in the United States. It was arguably the biggest political story to hit China in two decades, and Chinese microbloggers embraced it with gusto. In the hours following the concise, two-sentence official statement the state media carried about the firing, citizens posted millions of tweets to Sina Weibo, China's most popular microblog, speculating about the causes and circumstances of Bo’s abrupt fall.

    The Weibo frenzy lasted for roughly a day, but then, with ruthless efficiency, the censors that troll Chinese microblogs -- whether they represent the party or the controversy-averse microblog owners -- quickly vacuumed up most of those tweets, abolishing them from the site. Searches, too, for “Bo Xilai” on Weibo produced no results. The Chinese public knows nothing about what is happening between the factions who supported Bo, and those who opposed him.

    Amidst all this opacity, politically-interested netizens have fallen into a seemingly paranoid mood. This is especially the case for those who have something to gain or lose from the rise and fall of political leaders, such as businessmen whose success is highly dependent upon good relations with local governments. One of China’s best-known real-estate developers, Pan Shiyi, tweeted this on Monday night for his 9.2 million followers:

    This evening Weibo was strange indeed, there were some words that could not be sent out on Weibo. I saw a line of commentary dropped several times from Weibo, but what I saw made my scalp tingle; was it gremlins? Better to turn off the computer and go to sleep.

    Pan has a habit of posting cryptic tweets that regularly generate hundreds of responses. But this post landed in the midst of political scandal at the highest levels -- and it spurred rumors at the lowest levels. By Wednesday afternoon, it had been forwarded (or, retweeted) and commented on almost 3,000 times. Perhaps because of the post's ambiguity, censors have not removed it from the site.

    The reactions have been varied. Some netizens advised Pan to get some sleep (“early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy”); some thought he had seen a ghost. Others responded by simply writing “Bo Xilai” -- and many, many others responded simply with “Ferrari,” in reference to a mysterious weekend car wreck in Beijing involving a Ferrari and, rumors have it, somebody powerful.

    But the most curious interpretations of Pan's tweet came Tuesday mid-morning: Some suggested that a coup d’etat had taken place Monday night near Zhongnanhai, the Chinese Communist Party's leadership compound. This rumor spread rapidly, in various forms (and forums), online and offline. In a post that has since been deleted from Weibo (but is posted as an attachment to this article), one user wrote:

    According to reports, Beijing people said that last night the 38th Army was seen on Chang’an Avenue [which runs in front of Zhongnanhai] and an accumulation of police and military vehicles were in front of the Diayoutai State Guesthouse, signaling there will be big changes soon in our government.

    Several responders to Pan Shiyi’s tweet claimed they’d heard shots near Chang’an Avenue. Meanwhile, Weibo users, and The Epoch Times, a U.S.-based newspaper with connections to the banned Falun Gong spiritual movement, circulated photos of military vehicles on Chang’an Avenue that were allegedly taken during the alleged coup. Later, however, netizens began circulating a link to a military website from which the photos had been lifted: It turned out that the pictures were from night rehearsals for the 2010 National Day parade.

    By lunchtime Tuesday though, coup rumors were flying fast and furious on Weibo. One microblogger summed up the surprise of many when he wrote: “I tried the word 'coup' and it’s not blocked.” Indeed, it wasn’t –- but "coup" was not featured on Weibo’s trending topic lists, either. (However, a general lack of transparency in regard to the trending topic list means that nobody really knows how a subject ends up on it.)

    For every netizen who tweeted “coup?” “coup!” and “coup …” there were others who dismissed the whole matter, often with the devil-may-care humor so characteristic of Weibo. For example, on Tuesday, a netizen in Shanghai asked, “If there’s a coup d’etat, is it a legal holiday?”

    Still, that humor can often exhibit a very harsh anti-government edge. One of the more common jokes expressed during the coup fever was one that referenced the Chinese government’s unpopular decision to raise gasoline prices by 6.5 percent, and diesel by 7 percent, such as in this now deleted post (also posted as an attachment to this article) :

    Regarding last night’s internet rumors that loud noises in Beijing were caused by gunfire … actually the citizens of Beijing welcome the news that oil prices will rise and spontaneously gather in the streets to set off fireworks and celebrate. Don’t worry about a coup!

    One thing is for sure: neither rumors about the coup, nor jokes about the rumors, were destined to last long. By dinnertime Tuesday, most were deleted and “coup” was no longer a searchable term on Sina Weibo. Around that same time, Qin Gang, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry denied rumors of the coup to Bloomberg News.

    Still, despite censorship of the word "coup," speculation persists and the comment thread of Pan Shiyi’s mysterious Monday night post continues to grow, apparently uncensored. On Wednesday afternoon, several netizens on that thread noted that “Chang’an Avenue,” the site of the alleged coup on Tuesday morning, had, like “coup,” became a blocked search term on Weibo.

    Why? For now, at least, it’s unclear if that’s even the right question to be asking.

    (Adam Minter is the Shanghai correspondent for the World View blog. The opinions expressed are his own.)

    Chinese Coup Rumors Run Wild Online, Then Disappear: Adam Minter - Bloomberg
     
  7. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

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    There is no point of living in a heaven when there is no freedom:sad:
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The People's Liberation Army swears allegiance to the Communist Party, not the Head of State or the State itself

    If a "coup" has happened, it would probably be linked to an internal power struggle within in the Communist Party.

    It would almost certainly not be in support of a change of government style away from Communism.
     
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  9. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

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    I am unable to log in to a popular Chinese forum, is it a coincidence ?
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    But the Chinese are the one who has to decide.

    They prefer a glided cage with a chain around their leg like a parrot.

    They are also well trained like parrots and parrot what they are taught!

    Polly, take a cracker!
     
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  11. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

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    You are mocking the entire Chines in a politically correct way. Wish i had a vocabulary like you :troll:

    Any way, i will hate the chinese until they become a democracy.
     
  12. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Maybe situation in Tibet or Xinxiang must be very grim and there must be no political consensus to take military actions.
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If one read the article Chinese Coup Rumors Run Wild Online, Then Disappear: Adam Minter at Post #5, it shows that some unusual things are happening to include wiping out of information from the web or gunfire in Peking or Pieping or Beijing at night!
     
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If what is believed is happening, then maybe the beginning of your wish is emerging.

    It is surprising we are not hearing from NimoCN or Red Dragon, et al to include the old posters like Laughing Hyena, Beautiful Sunrise and others.

    Normally, they jump like frogs in a monsoon shower any time they spot the word 'China' in a thread or a post.

    The fact they are not here gets me worried.

    Are they are busy handling their Netizens on behalf of the CCP since that is more important than handling the CCP sponsored blitz that they are tasked to do?!

    Of course, these are my personal opinions and does not reflect that of the DFI management.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2012
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  15. venkat

    venkat Regular Member

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    TYPO GRAPHICAL ERROR!!! Please read "SOUP in CHINA!!!!:taunt:
     
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  16. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    False News..
     
  17. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2012
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  18. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Censors block online rumors about coup as China battles infighting within ruling party

    BEIJING: Chinese censors have blocked internet content speculating a military coup amid reports of serious power struggle within the ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) that threatens to disrupt a smooth transition of power when its general secretary and President Hu Jintao completes his term later this year.

    The struggle has come to the fore after the party's Chongqing city head Bo Xilai was removed from his post as his deputy had reportedly sought asylum in the US. Bo, who is a CCP founding member's son, was a contender for the party's top post.

    Insiders describe the struggle as one between the group representing princelings -- the offspring of old revolutionaries -- and those opposing them. Vice president Xi Jinping, a princeling, is seen as Hu's successor.

    "Some people at the top are childhood friends and children of national heroes. There is a group supporting these princelings and another one opposing it," a university teacher, who is closely associated with the CCP, told TOI. He is among millions of excited Communist cadre watching the unfolding drama.

    Many of them have been posting "information'' about the alleged coup and photographs of tanks and armored vehicles on Beijing's streets on Chinese version of Twitter -- Weibo. But reports said some of the pictures were old ones from military rehearsals. Experts said the rumors gained much traction due to the prevailing political situation in the country and the talk about infighting ahead of the CCP once-in-a-decade leadership shuffle.

    The ongoing struggle is also about the fight for supremacy between the party's pro-reform and the hardcore pro-Maoists sections. The Maoist faction still exerts some influence in China.

    Bo, who was tipped for a position in the CCP's powerful politburo standing committee, has a huge following among the hardline elements because he has been the only leader openly advocating Mao Zedong's policies and opposing the "capitalist class" produced by the party's new economic policies. Bo's removal led to suspicions that the pro-reform section was trying to completely wipe out the other group.

    The party gave Bo an opportunity to publicly explain himself at a press conference, which was attended by the foreign media. This was a rare exception made for a party member under a cloud, partly because he wields great influence in both the party and the People's Liberation Army. In fact, Beijing is agog with rumors that a section of the PLA is determined to protect Bo in case criminal charges are pressed against him.

    The Times of India on Mobile
     
  19. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    You start to block and censure only when you have things to hide and not let it go into the public domain.
     
  20. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    When chicoms will implode and that they will! the whole country would descend into either a civil war or a democracy which will make our democracy looks like milk and honey.
     
  21. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    The most recent data of internet users is 485 million in China. On Microblog / Weibo, China's indigenous version of twitter / facebook there're tons of such rumors overflowing all the time, at everyone's discretion.

    :namaste: It requires more knowledge and insight, plus a bit "common sense" in face of information blasts.

    The difference btwn Bo and Wen (or factions behind them) is mainly about debates over "equity" and "efficiency" - different lines of priority, rather than "Maoist" vs. "Reformist". Besides Bo's sacking brought the schism under spotlight against CCP's tradition to rule with "consensus" behind the scenes, ahead of the imminent power succession.
     
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