Colonialism in the 21st century?

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by Yusuf, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,269
    Likes Received:
    11,227
    Location:
    BANGalore
    As a new world order slowly emerges in the next few decades and with natural resources depleting all over the world, I was wondering if towards the next half of this century we would see attempts made by the econo-military powers going back to colonization of resources rich but less powerful states.

    We already see that these days its all worked out by alliances. The battle ground is Africa these days as it is the most under developed region and has unrecovered and un-discovered resources. India and China are doing every bit to influence matters there with friendship and alliances. But then the British too came to India to trade and then ruled the country.

    So as the population in both india and China rising and resources depleting, but with a powerful economy to feed, will these two countries in particular look at what happened 400 years ago when europe started to colonize to gain more resources and do the same?
     
  2.  
  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    When india is unable to control its backyard thesouth asia how can india be called a super power or for that matter a regional power,who can colonize other country.india has soft power but u need to wield hard power to protect it.As Us hollywood soft power but it has 12 super cruise aircraft carriers to protect its soft power.India has has hard power but its leaders were always afraid to weld it except for indira.I read a nice article by US diplomat WILLIAM H AVERY in financial express which im posting here.

    How the next decade can be India’s


     
  4. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,269
    Likes Received:
    11,227
    Location:
    BANGalore
    I was hoping that this thread that I opened some time back would have got in some good thoughts. Unfortunately it has not. Come on guys, pour in.
     
  5. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,381
    Likes Received:
    938
    It's quiet in here. Can you hear the jab roll?

    ...


    In a sense, colonialism occurs in the modern era via globalization, innit? That sort of 'neo-colonialism' is used by post-colonial critics to refer to the involvement of modern capitalist businesses in nations which were former colonies, stripping them bare of their resources, while financially aggrandizing only a small section of their populace. That sort of targeted 'financial enlargement' helps keeps things in place, as it were, by ensuring that the material status, social elevation and accruing political/social power of those that become 'elites' remain inextricably and inexorably linked to them. Not a bad ploy, if external sector, corporate competition for resources were limited. But in a global environment, with rapidly expanding third-world economies like India and China, the logical progression to an alternative strategy for this in the backdrop of public discontent arising from the limited, selective aggrandizement of the neo-colonialist style resource exploitation, would be to develop large scale, public infrastructure projects in return. That is what China, to a large extent, and India, to a more limited extent, have been doing in Africa. They realize that the 'old' style of 'neo-colonial' exploitation simply won't work anymore. In the context of a number of Latin Am and Afrikan countries that have become 'democratic' over the last half century, and where leaders have begun to realize that indefinite, protracted exploitation of the masses breeds seething discontent of the kind that topples governments and makes the holding on to political power ever more difficult, and that political power does indeed, to a great deal, hinge on the publique, that seems a feasible strategy. The logical progression to an alternative for this strategy as the neo - neo colonialists consolidate power is, in my opinion, to breed local, vicious wars - sponsor one insurgent community against another, so that political regimes recrudesce to becoming dependent on their military suppliers, rather than on those that espouse meeting their economic needs. In this context, countries with higher technological capabilities in the military arena will dominate the race for natural resources, so long as they maintain their technological prowess, and the insurgent weapons with which they sponsor insurgent communities remain of a higher degree than those the latter section of countries, the neo -neo colonialists that advocate economic development and geo-economics, are willing to part with.


    Within states, the kind of colonialism I believe we'll witness in the 21ist century is a sort of 'gentrification', where college-educated, urban 'elites' displace low-income, often longtime residents of cities or towns, both residentially, as also occupationally. 'Gentrification' will become a serious concern in most Northern states, as also those developing states where literacy rates do not keep pace with development, and where forceful measures of land removal are not used; it will have particular implications for India.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010

Share This Page