Chinese Jasmine Revolution Spreads Online

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China will follow the Arab world?

    Will there be a awakening in China?

    Are there serious problems being faced by the average Chinese people that they have mustered courage to stand up to the CCP?

    Unbelievable!

    Or it it foreign sponsored?
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    The instruments of governance in China is in action.

    China is the only country that realise the potent weapon the Internet is and have it mechanism in place to ensure 'subversive' thoughts are impossible to spread.

    Are the Chinese that disgusted with the Chinese Communists and their governance?

    The Chinese posters on international fora have always presented a rosy picture.

    In fact, even now on a board, a person of Chinese origin has this to say;

    Therefore, what is the reality?
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The Jasmine Revolution?


    by Pejman Yousefzadeh on February 20, 2011

    It doesn’t amount to all that much at the moment, but something is going on in China:

    Hundreds of people gathered Sunday in China’s major cities of Beijing and Shanghai but were dispersed by police in both places.

    In Beijing, people gathered in front of a restaurant in Wangfujing Street, but dispersed after police came to maintain order, Xinhua reported.

    People started to gather at around 2 p.m. (0600 GMT). When police tried to take away two men from the crowd soon after, the protesters were surrounded by foreign journalists holding cameras.

    Police began to clear out the traffic congestion, and most of the people left by 2.50 p.m.

    In Shanghai, crowds gathered around the People’s Square at the same time – around 2.00 p.m. Three people were detained by police, after a man aged around 30 began a speech at the intersection of Yunnan Zhong Road and Hankou Road.

    More:

    Postings circulating on the Internet have called on disgruntled Chinese to gather on Sunday in public places in 13 major cities to mark the “Jasmine Revolution” spreading through the Middle East.

    The calls have apparently led the Chinese government to censor postings containing the word “jasmine” in an attempt to quell any potential unrest.

    “We welcome… laid off workers and victims of forced evictions to participate in demonstrations, shout slogans and seek freedom, democracy and political reform to end ‘one party rule’,” one posting said.

    The postings, many of which appeared to have originated on overseas websites run by exiled Chinese political activists, called for protests in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and 10 other major Chinese cities.

    Protesters were urged to shout slogans including “we want food to eat,” “we want work,” we want housing,” “we want justice,” “long live freedom,” and “long live democracy.”

    Chinese authorities have sought to restrict media reports on the recent political turmoil that began in Tunisia as the “Jasmine Revolution” and spread to Egypt and throughout the Middle East.

    The Chinese government appears to be completely on edge concerning this issue. I would say that I doubt that anything is going to happen, but that’s what people said about the Middle East, isn’t it? If my money is on the Chinese government not being threatened in the short term, I suppose that it would be because the government has shown a pronounced tendency to torture and kill dissidents, a tactic as effective in the short term as it is brutal and appalling.

    http://www.chequerboard.org/2011/02/the-jasmine-revolution/
     
  5. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    China Blocks Coverage of ‘Jasmine Revolution’ Protests

    Feb. 21 (Bloomberg) -- China blocked phone messages and Web sites to stamp out any movement toward pro-democracy revolts that have toppled two leaders in the Middle East and sparked a bloody crackdown in Libya.

    Internet messages circulated over the weekend urged people to gather in 13 major cities to demand food, jobs, housing and justice in a “Jasmine Revolution.” Today, phone messages using the phrase in Chinese, 茉莉花革命, would not transmit on China Mobile Ltd.’s network in Beijing. Sina Corp.’s microblogging service, China’s most-popular, returned no related content when a search for the Chinese word for “Libya” was entered. Similar results were seen on the microblogging services of Tencent Holdings Ltd. and NetEase.com Inc.

    The restrictions highlight concern among Chinese leaders that some of the conditions present in the Middle East protests, including a large gap between rich and poor and high unemployment among university graduates, are present in China, ruled for six decades by an authoritarian Leninist government.

    “China is the only major economy in Asia that really hasn’t had a political change for many, many years,” William Belchere, global chief economist at Mirae Asset Securities, said in a Bloomberg Television interview in Hong Kong today. “You are getting some catalysts for these things. It’s always been food prices or people’s living standards not keeping up.”

    Protests took place yesterday in cities including Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, with foreign television coverage showing police clashing with small numbers of demonstrators and several protesters struggling as they were bundled away into custody.

    National Response

    More than 20 cities including Tianjin, Guangzhou and Chengdu stepped up security measures and universities in Shaanxi and Jiangsu kept students from leaving campuses, the South China Morning Post reported, citing the Hong Kong-based Information Centre for Human Rights and Democracy. In Guangzhou, at least 500 uniformed police guarded the park’s gates and metro exits yesterday, the paper reported.

    Today, there were no signs of unusual police presence in front of the Wangfujing McDonald’s in Beijing, site of yesterday’s gathering, nor at Tiananmen Square, scene of the bloody suppression of a pro-democracy uprising in 1989. The area around Zhongnanhai, the Beijing headquarters of the Communist Party that was surrounded in 1999 by members of the now-banned Falun Gong spiritual group, and Shanghai’s People’s Square were also quiet.

    Scale Tiny

    The scale of protests was tiny in a country of 1.3 billion when compared with the Middle East unrest, reflecting controls on information and the success of the Communist Party in spurring economic growth, analysts said. China’s economy has grown more than 90-fold since the start of economic reforms more than three decades ago and last year eclipsed Japan’s to become the world’s second-biggest after the U.S.

    “It’s unlikely the Jasmine Revolution will pose a big threat to the regime in the foreseeable future,” said Willy Wo- Lap Lam, an adjunct professor of history at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. “The big difference is that in China, the educated/professional classes have been co-opted into the system: most of them feel they are beneficiaries of 32 years of reform.”

    Record global food prices and high unemployment helped fuel the protests that overturned the regimes of Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak. Human Rights Watch says more than 200 people have been killed in Libya as security forces suppressed anti-government demonstrations. Violence has also broken out in Iran, Yemen and Bahrain.

    Food Index

    The United Nations’ global food price index jumped to a record in January as a combination of fires, drought and flooding spoiled harvests and fueled concern of food shortages.

    President Hu Jintao on Feb. 19 opened a seminar for provincial and ministerial officials by calling on the government to boost employment, “reasonably adjust” income distribution, reduce poverty, improve the supply of housing and promote “social justice,” the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

    To ensure a “harmonious and stable” society, China needs to solve “prominent problems” that may “harm” those goals, Hu said at the event that was also attended by Premier Wen Jiabao, Vice President Xi Jinping and other central government officials, according to Xinhua.

    China, home to 150 million people living on less than $1 a day, has frozen contract coal prices, ordered officials to ensure the supply of foodstuffs and fined retailers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. for misleading pricing in a bid to slow consumer price gains. The government has also limited mortgage loans and restricted home purchases in cities including Beijing and Shanghai to curb speculation in the property market.

    ‘Even Wen’

    “Even Wen Jiabao has talked about the political process not keeping up with the economic process,” said Belchere.

    Wen warned in a September interview with Cable News Network that failure to change the political system in line with economic growth could risk the gains made during two decades of market-oriented reforms. A month earlier he called for greater political openness in a speech in Shenzhen. His comments were not reported in the local media, sparking protests over unlawful censorship by a group of retired Communist Party officials.

    Lam said that even though Communist Party rule isn’t threatened by the Middle East revolts, Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, set to assume control of the Party next year, must work to close income gaps and embark on political reform to prevent future widespread unrest.

    “The pressure is on the Xi Jinping leadership to pick up the threads of political reform,” Lam said.

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/20...-coverage-of-jasmine-revolution-protests.html
     
  6. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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  7. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Jasmine revolution to fight on despite internet crackdown

    A Chinese police officer urges people to leave a planned protest site in Shanghai, as jittery Chinese authorities staged a show of force to squelch an online call for a "Jasmine Revolution". Source: AP

    THE Chinese Government, rattled by protests sweeping the Middle East, swung into action yesterday to quash online calls for a "jasmine revolution" on the streets of Beijing and 12 other cities across the country.

    Although very little happened in the way of protests at the appointed hour of 2pm, the internet rallying cry had clearly upset the authorities. Chinese mobile phone operators announced "technical issues" which stopped text messages being sent en masse.

    With no angry crowds or placards visible in Beijing and only a three-man scuffle breaking out in Shanghai, the authorities' tactics appear to have worked. Elsewhere, including the cities of Tianjin, Guangzhou, Wuhan and Chengdu, there were no reports of rallies. In the capital dissident protests were limited to a 25-year-old man placing a white jasmine flower outside the branch of McDonald's where the protesters were to have met. Although police efforts to detain the man, Liu Xiaobai, were hampered by crowds, he appeared shaken.

    "I'm quite scared because they took away my phone. I just put down some white flowers - what's wrong with that?" he said. "I'm just a normal citizen and I just want peace."

    In Wangfujing Street, Beijing, where protesters had been urged to gather, it became difficult to separate the aggrieved from thousands of shoppers who had stopped to look at the police and foreign television cameras.

    There was a strong police presence where protesters had been told to gather and more than a hundred known activists were detained before they could leave their homes.

    China's well-practiced cyber-censorship machinery roared swiftly into action to quell any unrest. On Weibo, the microblogging site similar to Twitter, the Government blocked searches for the word "jasmine" and prevented the uploading of photographs taken on mobile phones.

    The source of the call for a "jasmine revolution" appears to be Boxun.com, a rights advocacy website based in the US. It was closed down after being attacked by hackers. Its slogan - "we want food, we want work, we want housing, we want fairness!" - was not heard on the day of action.

    A few hailed the day's activities as a useful dry run and suggested that protesters should meet every Sunday.

    Chinese media have provided little coverage of events in Tunisia, Egypt and Bahrain, underplaying the depth of anti-government feeling. Another strategy is to report on protests but then prevent people commenting in chatrooms and in microblogs, feared to be the biggest source of unrest.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/new...ternet-crackdown/story-e6frg6so-1226009250830
     
  8. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Catching a whiff of jasmine in Kashgar

    TWO fire engines stood parked by the road leading past Kashgar's main mosque. They were clearly not deployed to fight any fires. Atop one sat a helmeted officer behind a shield. The nozzle of the vehicle's water hose pointed to the junction where an alley leads into the maze-like old city of this ancient oasis town. An officer in camouflage uniform sat on the other vehicle. In a nearby government compound, several more security personnel could be seen wearing helmets and carrying shields, standing next to a line of armoured vehicles. They had not been there the day before.

    Kashgar is no stranger to security measures. It belongs to a part of China's Xinjiang region that is periodically racked by separatist incidents, sometimes violent, involving members of the ethnic Uighur community. It has been particularly edgy in the past two or three years. An outbreak of deadly clashes between Uighurs and Han Chinese in 2009 in Urumqi, the provincial capital, has left the authorities uneasy.

    But today the government perhaps had reason to be a little more jittery than usual. Calls had been circulating on the internet for Chinese to gather in central areas of 13 major cities (none in Xinjiang were named) on February 20th to stage a "jasmine revolution"—in reference to the upheavals that have are convulsing the Arab world. An unsourced posting to an American-based Chinese website, Boxun.com (in Chinese, and currently under a DDOS-style attack) seems to have started the flurry. Chinese authorities quickly moved to suppress it by blocking posts on microblogs that contain the word “jasmine”. They stepped up surveillance of several activists and deployed large numbers of police near central Beijing, apparently to pre-empt any protests.

    Banyan’s latest column discusses why China does not, in fact, appear to be on the brink of a pro-democracy upheaval. In Xinjiang however the authorities might worry that Muslim Uighurs can identify more readily with their democracy-seeking co-religionists in the Middle East and Africa. Many of Kashgar's Uighurs do have much to complain about, from discrimination to unemployment to a makeover of their old city which has forced thousands of them from their homes into soulless new apartment buildings. Soon after my arrival on February 18th I noticed I was being followed by a black Volkswagen. It remained on my tail until I left the city 48 hours later. When I proceeded on foot, one of its occupants would get out of his car to lurk behind me. Kashgar's police have a reputation for intimidating foreign correspondents in this way.

    They probably have little to fear, however, from any popular uprising in support of democracy. Xinjiang's troubles tend to be related to ethnic tensions rather than democratic yearnings (though some activists might hope that ending rule by the Han-dominated Communist Party might pave the way for democracy). In Urumqi, tensions between the communities have become so ingrained in the aftermath of the rioting in 2009 that it is hard to imagine Hans and Uighurs marching together to call for political reform. Security is far less visible than it was then, but squads of black-clad riot police, some with batons and others with rifles, can still sometimes be seen in the streets.

    Xinjiang does have at least one strong connection with recent events in Egypt, however. It was here that Chinese authorities pioneered the technique of shutting off the internet and mobile-phone messaging systems as way of controlling unrest. Five days cut off from the internet was not enough to stymie the masses arrayed against Hosni Mubarak’s regime. Xinjiang was subject to similar restrictions for months in the wake of its riots. This created at least some sense of common cause between Uighurs and Hans. Members of both communities complain that business was badly disrupted by the blackout.

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/asiaview/2011/02/precautions_xinjiang
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If there is an internet blackout, then the Chinese posters will not be able to access any fora, internal or external!

    Blocking the internet is a sure indication to the Chinese Netizens that there is some problem that the Chinese govt does not want the people to know. It will whet their curiosity and when they see the protests on the street and come to know what is on, they will be encouraged to join {?}.

    There must be a serious problem in China over food, wages and jobs or else such protests would not have made the day, given that they are indoctrinated to be grateful to their Communist Party.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2011
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    And Sir I am waiting for our 50 cent army to post. I am sure they will have all the access to spread the "all izzz well" propaganda.
     
  11. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    China can(will) do anything to crush the revolution and get away with it. Such is the clout of their economy.
     
  12. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    frankly speaking, I don't know anything about "Jasmine Revolution " so called for time being..I will try to search it by blogs or QQ...
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    So, can one take it that there is no problems?

    I would be surprised it all this including photos are media invention!

    The fact that you could access us, it means that the internet is not blocked or that you have some special permission!

    All this media news is real confusing!
     
  14. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    well, If I can not access it, then I am sure that most of Chinese common netizens also can not access it.

    and, if the "Jasmine Revolution " so called can not receive the attention of me until now, it also proves that it also can not attract the attention of most CHinese common.
     
  15. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    I told you they would have special access Sir.
     
  16. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    Last edited: Feb 21, 2011
  17. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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  18. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    What do you expect a regime that brutally cracked down many demonstrations including famous Tiananmen Square could all of sudden becomes nicer to Chinese people? They are determined to do anything to tightly hold the grip of power.

    Even with so many injustice, corruptions and mistreatments, Chinese people are yet ready to challenge the mighty CCP government. Chinese people could endure tremendous pressure and hardship as long as their basic needs are met. However, the economic reform greatly enhanced people’s living standard. Chinese people no longer satisfied with just feeding their empty stomach. They want dignity, respect and freedom.

    CCP government can create the world most advanced software, biggest force of internet police to block the flow of information. They can hire the most notorious thugs to threaten people's freedom of speech. But they can’t stop Chinese people’s desire to live a better and higher quality life, and their desire to live in a country where justice is served and government answers to its own people.

    The clock is ticking and the world is watching. CCP could become progressive force in Chinese history or become roadblock. Let time tell what will happen.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2011
  19. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    CCP will do everything to control its firm hold on China. Even if it means arresting and slaughtering the protestors. Under no circumstances will CCP will entertain and stand idle to such protests.

    If the people of China really need a revolution to change CCP then they need to take a different approach.
     
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    My postulation apparently turns out correct again that the US has ensured that the capitalism and its vices and virtues have gripped the Chinese people and that the US will ensure that China goes the USSR way.
     
  21. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Sir are you indicating a subtle US brainwash (from communist angle) of the Chinese people by capitalism?
    Even if it is happening, I think there's still a lot of time and change due before a Tunisia or Egypt is repeated in China in any manner.
    And even if a major struggle breaks out, the way China is administered may change but not the society at the grassroots. The outcome I believe would not be as worse for China as it has been for Russia.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     

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