Chinese hackers attack Indian military websites, Tibetan sites & Japan's Aerospace

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by JAYRAM, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Mar 31, 2012 at 02:04pm IST


    New York: Indian military research bodies and Tibetan activists have been targeted by hackers based in China, with a former graduate student at a Chinese university emerging as a key figure responsible for the cyber breach, according to a report by a computer security firm.

    In its 24 page report, Tokyo-based Trend Micro said the hacking campaign, dubbed 'Luckycat' targeted Indian military research institutions, entities in Japan as well as the Tibetan community.

    The campaign, active since around June 2011, has been linked to 90 attacks against targets in Japan and India as well as Tibetan activists. In all, the Luckycat campaign managed to compromise 233 computers in systematic attacks.

    Victims of the attack also include Indian shipping companies, Japan's aerospace, energy and engineering companies and at least 30 computer systems of Tibetan advocacy groups.

    Trend Micro said each malware attack involves a unique campaign code that can be used to track which victims were compromised by which malware attack.

    "This illustrates that the attackers are both very aggressive and continually target their intended victims. These are not smash-and-grab attacks but constitute a "campaign" comprising a series of ongoing attacks over time,' it said in its report.

    Trend Micro tracked elements of the cyber attack campaign to hackers based in China.

    The Luckycat campaign attacked a diverse set of targets using a variety of malware, some of which have been linked to other cyber-espionage campaigns.

    The attackers behind this campaign maintain a diverse set of command-and-control infrastructure and leverages anonymity tools to obfuscate their operations, the report said.

    It cited the example of a hacking attack on India's ballistic missile defence programme.

    In this, a malicious document containing information on the programme was used to lure potential victims into opening it.

    This document contained malicious code that exploited a vulnerability in computer software enabling the hackers to penetrate the compromised computer.

    Similarly, Tibetan advocates received e-mails about self-immolation while victims in Japan received emails asking them to open attachments that had information about the country's earthquake and nuclear disaster.

    A different campaign known as the 'ShadowNet', too has a history of targeting Tibetan activists as well as the Indian government.

    The Luckycat attacks are technically similar to those of the Shadow Network, a spy operation which since 2009 has targeted the government of India and the Dalai Lama's personal e-mails.

    The Shadow Network attacks are believed to be the handiwork of hackers who studied in China's Sichuan Province at the University of Electronic Science and Technology, which also receives government financing for computer network defence research.

    The People's Liberation Army has an online reconnaissance bureau in the city.

    "Cyber-espionage campaigns often focus on specific industries or communities of interest in addition to a geographic focus.

    Different positions of visibility often yield additional sets of targets pursued by the same threat actors," Trend Micro said.

    The New York Times said the attacks were connected to an online alias, the owner of which is Gu Kaiyuan, a former graduate student at China's Sichuan University, which receives government financing for its research in computer network defence.

    Gu is believed to work at Tencent, China's leading Internet portal company and he may have recruited students to work on the university s research involving computer attacks and defence.

    According to online records, Gu wrote numerous articles about hacking under the names of "scuhkr" and Gu Kaiyuan. When contacted by the Times about the attacks, Gu said, "I have nothing to say."

    The attacks are not linked directly to Chinese government-employed hackers but security experts and other researchers say the techniques and the victims point to a state-sponsored campaign.

    "The fact they targeted Tibetan activists is a strong indicator of official Chinese government involvement," expert in computer security James Lewis said in the New York Times report.

    "A private Chinese hacker may go after economic data but not a political organisation."

    The Times report said security researchers believe that the Chinese government may use people not affiliated with the government in hacking operations.

    Chinese hacker attack Indian websites - Tech News - IBNLive
     
  2.  
  3. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Chinese grad hacks Indian military, Tibetan sites
    The New York Times, Hindustan Times
    San Francisco, March 31, 2012

    A breach of computers belonging to companies in Japan and India and to Tibetan activists has been linked to a former graduate student at a Chinese university - putting a face on the persistent espionage by Chinese hackers against foreign firms and groups.


    The attacks were connected to an online alias, according to a report to be released on Friday by Trend Micro, a Tokyo-basedcomputer security firm.

    The owner of the alias is Gu Kaiyuan, a ex-graduate student at Sichuan University, China, which receives government financing for its research in computer network defense.

    Gu is now an employee at Tencent, China's leading Internet portal company. According to the report, he may have recruited students to work on the university's research involving computer attacks and defense. Experts say the techniques and the victims point to a state-sponsored campaign. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/31_03_12-metro19.jpg

    "The fact they targeted Tibetan activists is a strong indicator of official Chinese government involvement," said James A Lewis of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. "A private Chinese hacker may go after economic data but not a political organisation."

    The Trend Micro report describes systematic attacks on at least 233 personal computers. The victims include Indian military research organisations and shipping companies; Japanese aerospace, energy and engineering companies; and at least 30 computer systems of Tibetan advocacy groups. The espionage has been going on for at least 10 months and is continuing. Trend Micro did not release the names of the victims.

    In the report, the researchers detailed how they had traced the attacks to an e-mail address used to register one of the command-and-control servers that directed the attacks.

    The person who used the alias, "scuhkr" - possibly shorthand for Sichuan University hacker - wrote articles about hacking, which were posted to online hacking forums. The New York Times traced that alias to Gu. Gu studied at Sichuan University from 2003 to 2006.

    The attacks are technically similar to a spy operation known as the Shadow Network, which since 2009 has targeted the Indian government and also pilfered a year's worth of the Dalai Lama's personal e-mails. Security researchers suggest that the Chinese government may use people not affiliated with the government in hacking operations - what security professionals call a campaign.

    Chinese grad hacks Indian military, Tibetan sites - Hindustan Times
     
  4. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Chinese hackers attack Indian military websites

    PTI New York, March 31, 2012 | UPDATED 15:20 IST

    Tweet

    Indian military research bodies and Tibetan activists have been targeted by hackers based in China, with a former graduate student at a Chinese university emerging as a key figure responsible for the cyber breach, according to a report by a computer security firm.

    In its 24 page report, Tokyo-based Trend Micro said the hacking campaign, dubbed 'Luckycat' targeted Indian military research institutions, entities in Japan as well as the Tibetan community.

    The campaign, active since around June 2011, has been linked to 90 attacks against targets in Japan and India as well as Tibetan activists. In all, the Luckycat campaign managed to compromise 233 computers in systematic attacks.

    Victims of the attack also include Indian shipping companies, Japan's aerospace, energy and engineering companies and at least 30 computer systems of Tibetan advocacy groups.

    Trend Micro said each malware attack involves a unique campaign code that can be used to track which victims were compromised by which malware attack.

    "This illustrates that the attackers are both very aggressive and continually target their intended victims.

    These are not smash-and-grab attacks but constitute a "campaign" comprising a series of ongoing attacks over time,' it said in its report.

    Trend Micro tracked elements of the cyber attack campaign to hackers based in China.

    The Luckycat campaign attacked a diverse set of targets using a variety of malware, some of which have been linked to other cyber-espionage campaigns.

    The attackers behind this campaign maintain a diverse set of command-and-control infrastructure and leverages anonymity tools to obfuscate their operations, the report said.

    It cited the example of a hacking attack on India's ballistic missile defence programme.

    In this, a malicious document containing information on the programme was used to lure potential victims into opening it.

    This document contained malicious code that exploited a vulnerability in computer software enabling the hackers to penetrate the compromised computer.

    Similarly, Tibetan advocates received e-mails about self-immolation while victims in Japan received emails asking them to open attachments that had information about the country's earthquake and nuclear disaster.

    A different campaign known as the 'ShadowNet', too has a history of targeting Tibetan activists as well as the Indian government.

    The Luckycat attacks are technically similar to those of the Shadow Network, a spy operation which since 2009 has targeted the government of India and the Dalai Lama's personal e-mails.

    The Shadow Network attacks are believed to be the handiwork of hackers who studied in China's Sichuan Province at the University of Electronic Science and Technology, which also receives government financing for computer network defence research.

    The People's Liberation Army has an online reconnaissance bureau in the city.

    "Cyber-espionage campaigns often focus on specific industries or communities of interest in addition to a geographic focus.

    Different positions of visibility often yield additional sets of targets pursued by the same threat actors," Trend Micro said.

    The New York Times said the attacks were connected to an online alias, the owner of which is Gu Kaiyuan, a former graduate student at China's Sichuan University, which receives government financing for its research in computer network defence.

    Gu is believed to work at Tencent, China's leading Internet portal company and he may have recruited students to work on the university's research involving computer attacks and defence.

    According to online records, Gu wrote numerous articles about hacking under the names of "scuhkr" and Gu Kaiyuan.

    When contacted by the Times about the attacks, Gu said, "I have nothing to say."

    The attacks are not linked directly to Chinese government-employed hackers but security experts and other researchers say the techniques and the victims point to a state-sponsored campaign.

    "The fact they targeted Tibetan activists is a strong indicator of official Chinese government involvement," expert in computer security James Lewis said in the New York Times report.

    "A private Chinese hacker may go after economic data but not a political organisation."

    The Times report said security researchers believe that the Chinese government may use people not affiliated with the government in hacking operations.


    Chinese hackers attack Indian military websites : Americas News - India Today
     
  5. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Chinese Hackers Linked To Cyber-Espionage In Japan, India, Tibet


    By Antone Gonsalves, CRN
    March 30, 2012 6:22 PM ET

    Chinese hackers have been linked to a cyber-espionage campaign that planted data-gathering malware in a total of 233 computers of Tibetan activists and military and industrial entities in Japan and India.

    The so-called "Luckycat" campaign has been active since at least June 2011 and has been linked to 90 attacks that use malware tailored for each victim, security vendor Trend Micro said in a report released Friday.

    "This illustrates that the attackers are both very aggressive and continually target their intended victims," the report said. "These are not smash-and-grab attacks, but constitute a campaign comprising a series of ongoing attacks over time."

    The hackers targeted military research institutions and shipping companies in India; energy, engineering and aerospace entities in China and 30 computers of Tibetan activists. Trend Micro researchers traced the attacks to an e-mail address used to register a command-and-control server. They also mapped the address to a Chinese instant messaging screen name and from there to an online alias, "scuhkr."

    The New York Times reported that it traced the alias to Gu Kaiyuan, a former graduate student at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China. The university receives government funding for computer network defense, the newspaper said. According to online records obtained by the Times, Gu is now apparently working for Tencent, a leading Internet portal company in China.

    While studying at Sichuan University from 2003 to 2006, Gu wrote numerous articles about hacking under the alias "scuhkr," which is believed to stand for "Sichuan University hacker," according to the Times. The report found that "scuhkr" had recruited other university students for a network attack and defense research project at the university's Institute of Information Security in 2005.

    The Times reached Gu at Tencent and asked him about the attacks. "I have nothing to say," he told the newspaper.

    Security experts have said China will use people outside the government for hacking operations, which researchers call campaigns. Trend Micro found that malware used in Luckycat were also used in a campaign called "Shadownet,” an indication that there may have been some collaboration. Shadownet has also targeted Tibetan activists and the Indian government.

    In both campaigns, e-mails tailored to the recipients are used to get them to click on an attachment that then infects the computer with malware, taking advantage of vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office and Adobe software. Once the malware connects to the hackers' server, additional code is installed to establish control over the system.

    In the Luckycat campaign, e-mails sent to Japanese targets took advantage of the confusion following last year's tsunami, the report said. E-mail sent to Indian military institutions contained information on the country's ballistic missile defense program, while messages sent to Tibetan activist used the theme of self-sacrifice.

    Security vendor Symantec uncovered the campaign two weeks ago, naming it Luckycat after the login name of one of the other attackers, according to the Times. Without knowing about Symantec's work, Trend Micro released a far more detailed report.


    http://www.crn.com/news/security/23...;jsessionid=+vulligdUitfBDeMVmb+ZQ**.ecappj01
     
  6. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Former student from China hacked Indian Military Research Firms: Report

    Nicole Perlroth, The New York Times, Updated: March 30, 2012 12:32 IST

    [​IMG]

    Nart Villeneuve of Trend Micro said the
    attacks were part of a continuous campaign
    in which hackers "are busy and stay busy."


    San Francisco: A breach of computers belonging to companies in Japan and India and to Tibetan activists has been linked to a former graduate student at a Chinese university - putting a face on the persistent espionage by Chinese hackers against foreign companies and groups.

    The attacks were connected to an online alias, according to a report to be released on Friday by Trend Micro, a computer security firm with headquarters in Tokyo.

    The owner of the alias, according to online records, is Gu Kaiyuan, a former graduate student at Sichuan University, in Chengdu, China, which receives government financing for its research in computer network defense.

    Mr. Gu is now apparently an employee at Tencent, China's leading Internet portal company, also according to online records. According to the report, he may have recruited students to work on the university's research involving computer attacks and defense.

    The researchers did not link the attacks directly to government-employed hackers. But security experts and other researchers say the techniques and the victims point to a state-sponsored campaign.

    "The fact they targeted Tibetan activists is a strong indicator of official Chinese government involvement," said James A. Lewis, a former diplomat and expert in computer security who is a director and senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. "A private Chinese hacker may go after economic data but not a political organization."

    Neither the Chinese embassy in Washington nor the Chinese consulate in New York answered requests for comment.

    The Trend Micro report describes systematic attacks on at least 233 personal computers. The victims include Indian military research organizations and shipping companies; aerospace, energy and engineering companies in Japan; and at least 30 computer systems of Tibetan advocacy groups, according to both the report and interviews with experts connected to the research. The espionage has been going on for at least 10 months and is continuing, the report says.

    In the report, the researchers detailed how they had traced the attacks to an e-mail address used to register one of the command-and-control servers that directed the attacks. They mapped that address to a QQ number - China's equivalent of an online instant messaging screen name - and from there to an online alias.

    The person who used the alias, "scuhkr" - the researchers said in an interview that it could be shorthand for Sichuan University hacker - wrote articles about hacking, which were posted to online hacking forums and, in one case, recruited students to a computer network and defense research program at Sichuan University's Institute of Information Security in 2005, the report said.

    The New York Times traced that alias to Mr. Gu. According to online records, Mr. Gu studied at Sichuan University from 2003 to 2006, when he wrote numerous articles about hacking under the names of "scuhkr" and Gu Kaiyuan. Those included a master's thesis about computer attacks and prevention strategies. The Times connected Mr. Gu to Tencent first through an online university forum, which listed where students found jobs, and then through a call to Tencent.

    Reached at Tencent and asked about the attacks, Mr. Gu said, "I have nothing to say."

    Tencent, which is a privately managed and stock market-listed Internet company, did not respond to several later inquiries seeking comment.

    The attacks are technically similar to a spy operation known as the Shadow Network, which since 2009 has targeted the government of India and also pilfered a year's worth of the Dalai Lama's personal e-mails. Trend Micro's researchers found that the command-and-control servers directing the Shadow Network attacks also directed the espionage in its report.

    The Shadow Network attacks were believed to be the work of hackers who studied in China's Sichuan Province at the University of Electronic Science and Technology, another university in Chengdu, that also receives government financing for computer network defense research. The People's Liberation Army has an online reconnaissance bureau in the city.

    Some security researchers suggest that the Chinese government may use people not affiliated with the government in hacking operations - what security professionals call a campaign.

    For example, earlier this year, Joe Stewart, a security expert at Dell SecureWorks, traced a campaign against the Vietnam government and oil exploration companies to an e-mail address that belonged to an Internet marketer in China.

    "It suggested there may be a marketplace for freelance work - that this is not a 9-to-5 work environment," Mr. Stewart said. "It's a smart way to do business. If you are a country attacking a foreign government and you don't want it tied back, it would make sense to outsource the work to actors who can collect the data for you."

    The campaign detailed in the Trend Micro report was first documented two weeks ago by Symantec, a security firm based in Mountain View, Calif. It called the operation "Luckycat," after the login name of one of the other attackers, and issued its own report. But Trend Micro's report provides far more details. The two firms were unaware that they were both studying the same operation.

    Trend Micro's researchers said they were first tipped off to the campaign three months ago when they received two malware samples from two separate computer attacks - one in Japan and another in Tibet - and found that they were both being directed from the same command-and-control servers. Over the next several months, they traced more than 90 different malware attacks back to those servers.

    Each attack began, as is often the case, with an e-mail intended to lure victims into opening an attachment. Indian victims were sent an e-mail about India's ballistic missile defense program. Tibetan advocates received e-mails about self-immolation or, in one case, a job opening at the Tibet Fund, a nonprofit based in New York City. After Japan's earthquake and nuclear disaster, victims in Japan received an e-mail about radiation measurements.

    Each e-mail contained an attachment that, when clicked, automatically created a backdoor from the victim's computer to the attackers' servers. To do this, the hackers exploited security holes in Microsoft Office and Adobe software. Almost immediately, they uploaded a directory of the victims' machines to their servers. If the files looked enticing, hackers installed a remote-access tool, or rat, which gave them real-time control of their target's machine. As long as a victim's computer was connected to the Internet, attackers had the ability to record their keystrokes and passwords, grab screenshots and even crawl from that machine to other computers in the victim's network.

    Trend Micro's researchers would not identify the names of the victims in the attacks detailed in its report, but said that they had alerted the victims, and that many were working to remediate their systems.

    A spokesman for India's Defense Ministry, Sitanshu Kar, said he was not aware of the report or of the attacks it described. Fumio Iwai, a deputy consul at the Japanese consulate in New York, declined to comment.

    As of Thursday, the campaign's servers were still operating and computers continue to leak information.

    "This was not an individual attack that started and stopped," said Nart Villeneuve, a researcher that helped lead Trend Micro's efforts. "It's a continuous campaign that has been going on for a long time. There are constant compromises going on all time. These guys are busy and stay busy."


    Former student from China hacked Indian Military Research Firms: Report
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  7. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    340
    and what we can do again helpless

    we dont have any policy thats same thing will be happen in war , they will attack us and we will remain helpless
     
  8. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's

    Indian govt: We don't care!. If chinese hackers will give us some money, we can provide some good defence to our govt sites!
     
  9. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
  10. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    4,497
    Likes Received:
    4,142
    Such policies can't be formulated by the people whose sole aim is to loot and plunder, and serve foreigners!
     
  11. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    340
    well its not about money , i hope you know they know your all data better then you.
     
  12. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    340
    will you pls explain??
     
  13. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Japan is building a virus bomb aiming china

     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  14. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    ..............................................................
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  15. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
  16. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Messages:
    9,252
    Likes Received:
    3,347
    Location:
    Brussels
    Govt websites are low-value targets. They do not host any sensitive information online anymore. However, mailservers usually fall pray to these tactics eventually leaking out confidential communication.

    Americans have funded DARPA with huge monies to develop new-gen encryption algorithm. Indians need something on that line unless ofcourse they are moving their confidential communication out of chai-samosa session, which is usually immune to eavesdropping.

    Major problem that arose in recent days is smartphone-hacking of diplomats visiting PRC. Every US Govt official visiting China is directed by NSA to pull battery out of their Blackberrys as soon as they enter chinese airspace.
     
  17. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Report details successful China-based cyber-espionage

    Online security company Trend Micro releases report uncovering ongoing campaign of infiltrating industrial sites in Japan and India and also targeting Tibetan activists.


    by Martin LaMonica March 30, 2012 7:14 AM PDT

    Hackers based in China have carried out 90 attacks on targets in Japan, India, and Tibetan activists in a cyber-espionage campaign started last year, according to a report.

    Trend Micro today released an analysis of the Luckycat campaign, which it traced back to a command-and-control center in China. The attacks are part of an organized effort, rather than random hacks, and have compromised 233 computers, according to the report.

    The New York Times today reported the attacks can be traced back to a specific individual, a former graduate student in China who may have recruited others to work on the Luckycat campaign.

    The attackers targeted a number of Japanese and Indian industrial sites working in aerospace, enginery, engineering, shipping, and military research.

    Computers were infected with malware by enticing e-mail recipients to open attachments, according to the Times article.

    Trend Micro said the attacks have been "extremely successful" and were designed to establish an ongoing presence to monitor targeted sites.

    The operators behind Luckycat also provided infrastructure for other attacks, including the ShadowNet campaign, Trend Micro said.


    Report details successful China-based cyber-espionage | Security - CNET News
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  18. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    A virus for cyberdefense? Japan has something cooking

    Fujitsu is said to be working on an active-defense virus amid growing cyberattacks against Japan--which also has a law forbidding the creation of computer viruses.

    by Tim Hornyak January 4, 2012 10:52 AM PST

    For several years, Japan has been developing a computer virus that can track, identify, and disable cyberthreats, according to a story in the Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper.

    Fujitsu reportedly is working on the cyberweapon for Japan's Defense Ministry under a 178.5 million yen ($2.32 million) project initiated in fiscal 2008 by the ministry's Technical Research and Development Institute.

    The system "can identify not only the immediate source of attack, but also all 'springboard' computers used to transmit the virus," the Yomiuri reported, citing anonymous sources.

    "Test runs in closed networks have helped the ministry to confirm the cyberweapon's functionality and compile data on cyber-attack patterns."

    But whether Fujitsu's "active defense" virus would work in the real world is a big question. Security experts have said it would rarely be effective due to the layered nature of server deployment. Furthermore, innocent third parties could be mistaken for the attackers.

    Japan suffered a series of cyberattacks last fall, with targets including major defense contractor Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the Japanese parliament, and diplomatic missions overseas.

    Even Fujitsu was attacked, with denial-of-service hits knocking out some of its cloud-computing services for local governments.

    Japanese media have blamed Chinese hackers in some cases, and called for stronger government protection.

    The criminal code in Japan prohibits the creation of computer viruses, but a government panel on information security policy is set to discuss cyberweapons in context of their legality as a defense.

    Fujitsu, for its part, hasn't said anything about the virus project.

    A virus for cyberdefense? Japan has something cooking | Security - CNET News
     
  19. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Ha Ha...:rofl: Our babu's may not even have knowledge about how computer works... You have to watch Loksabha or Rajyasabha TV sometimes..
     
  20. SLASH

    SLASH Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    458
    I'm sure we must be attacking their sites too...
     
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Nothing surprising.
     

Share This Page