China 'cannot be free rider on trade': On Prison Economy

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, May 21, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    China 'cannot be free rider on trade'

    China cannot be a "free rider" in global trade, the EU's trade commissioner has warned.

    Karel De Gucht said that China had to take responsibility for the global trading system, just as the EU did.

    Mr De Gucht's comments come just days after the EU said it may investigate claims that Chinese telecom firms have been paid subsidies, allowing them to flood markets with cheap equipment.

    The EU fears illegal payments may give Chinese firms an unfair advantage.

    China is the EU's second biggest trading partner, after the US.

    Probes

    "China has become a very big economy and they have to take responsibility, just as we do, for the global trading system," Mr De Gucht told the BBC.

    "Very important in taking responsibility for a global trading system is [to] follow a number of disciplines with respect to export credits, with respect to dumping, subsidies, cheap capital and so on and so on.

    "You cannot be one of the biggest economies in the world and a free rider at the same time."


    The EU is holding 18 trade investigations into China.

    The largest inquiry to date is into whether China illegally dumped - unfairly subsidised - solar products. According to reports, Brussels plans to impose anti-dumping taxes of up to 68% on Chinese imports.

    The EU has a deadline to impose these duties of 5 June.

    Mr De Gucht was in New York to meet US businesses at a time when the EU is looking to strengthen its transatlantic trade ties.

    Wide-ranging EU-US trade negotiations are expected to be launched later this year. The aim is to clinch a major free trade deal before October 2014.

    He told the BBC that he expected regulation to be the biggest challenge for the negotiations.

    "You have existing regulation, new regulation - how do you make it compatible?"

    "I wouldn't call it a stumbling block but it's a big piece. It's also the most rewarding but it will ask for a lot of political resolve to do it."

    BBC News - China 'cannot be free rider on trade'

    ******************************************

    One of the Chinese posters was commenting that the EU is dependent on China, if they want to do well.

    It appears that the EU is smelling the coffee and have realised that China cannot be a free tripper.

    The message is There ain't no such thing as a free lunch!

    One of the Chinese way of keeping good cheap is the bonded labour in the Laogais.
     
    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  2.  
  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere


     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere




    [video]http://kotaku.com/5908485/watch-the-slavery-documentary-that-apparently-pissed-off-china[/video]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Watch the Al Jazeera's video to understand why Chinese goods are cheap!
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The High Cost of China's Laogai

    Editor's Note: I never go into Walmart because I don't want to buy Chinese Products made with forced Chinese laborers and I don't want to support an Illuminati corporation that is aiding in the takeover and destruction of America. When you buy cheap Chinese goods, you accelerate the loss of manufactured goods from other domestic or foreign sources. The reason that our courts today are handing out long prison sentences for relatively minor crimes such as growing marijuana (E.g. 99 years), is to build a free labor prison population here in America which will be used (after the NWO takeover) in exactly the same manner as the imprisoned Chinese laborers described in this article. You also need to realize that in a few years, Russia and China will make war on the United States. When that happens, where are we going to get out manufactured goods (from steel to toasters) from? The closed American factories littering the landscape? ..Ken]

    By Riordan Galluccio (The Epoch Times)
    The High Cost of China's Laogai
    March 24, 2004

    With his teeth cracked and hands bleeding, Wan Guifu struggled to split one more watermelon seed with his teeth. For him working outside in the freezing cold over 10 hours a day came with little choice-it was either work to produce Hand-picked Melon Seeds for the labor camp or be beaten until unconscious. At 57 years old Wan worked until he could no longer accomplish this brutal task, and was beaten to death by his fellow inmates at the Lanzhou No. 1 Detention Center in China.

    The seeds Wan was forced to produce, Zhenglin Hand-picked Melon Seeds, are now currently exported throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, Southeast Asia and Taiwan. Through the use of this type of slave labor Lanzhou Zhenglin Nongken Foods Ltd. has become the largest producer of roasted nuts in China with sales reaching 460 million Yuan. (US $55 million)

    Free and Endless Supply of Workers
    China's booming economy continues to increase through its use of slave labor or Laogai camps. Laogai means "reform through labor." It's a system of prison factories and detention centers set up by former Chinese leader Mao Zedong during the 1950's as a means to re-educate through labor and increase economic gain for the People's Republic of China. As of 1979, there were apparently only several thousand people being forced to work in the Laogai system. Today it has become an enormous source of free labor and financial profit for the Chinese government. According to estimates from the Laogai Research Foundation, there are 6.8 million people incarcerated in China's 1,100 labor institutions.

    For those incarcerated in these facilities, the reality they face is long hours of brutal treatment with little sleep or food to sustain themselves. Reports of 20-hour work days and violent oppression force some detainees to choose suicide instead of being beaten, starved, or worked to death according to a paper by Stephen D. Marshall, "Chinese Laogai: a hidden role in 'Developing Tibet." Others mutilate or injure themselves in an effort to avoid the work. Inmates who fall behind or refuse to work are shocked with electric batons, beaten, sexually assaulted, or thrown into solitary confinement. Among those that make up the population in these labor camps are criminals, political prisoners, and practitioners of the spiritual practice Falun Gong, who reportedly now make up to half of those detained in the Laogai labor system.

    Who Uses Slave Labor?
    Forced labor has become both a form a torture and a source of great profit for China. With the enormous amount of free labor that comes from Laogai, China has lured many overseas businesses into its profit-through-slave-labor system. With ridiculously cheap wholesale labor costs many cannot resist the bait and unknowingly come to support this illegal practice.

    Common everyday products ranging from artificial Christmas trees, Christmas tree lights, bracelets, tools and foodstuffs, et cetera are among some of the products manufactured and exported from these facilities. According to a 1998 House Committee on International Relations report, companies who reportedly have or had products made in China's Laogai are Midas, Staples, Chrysler, and Nestles. A recent report from one detainee in the Changji Labor Camp in Xinjiang states the Tianshan Wooltex Stock Corporation Ltd., a contractor to Changji Labor Camp, makes products for overseas companies such as Banana Republic, Neiman Marcus, Bon Genie, Holt Renfrew, French Connection and others. Orders from Banana Republic number between 200,000 and 280,000 pieces a year.

    The products made in these facilities are produced by people who are forced to work in unsafe and unhealthy conditions. Detainees in Laogai have said that because of malnutrition, sleep deprivation and stress they often contract lice, scabies, hepatitis, tuberculosis, and other ailments. Sick detainees are still forced to work. Many are not allowed to take showers for long periods of time, allowing all manner of bodily substances to come into contact with the items they manufacture. These products are then shipped all over the world.

    Stopping Laogai Products
    Laws on the books that outlaw slave labor products have not been able to stop the tide of illegally and inhumanely manufactured merchandise from being shipped and traded worldwide. For example, since 1983 it has been illegal to import goods into the United States made through using slave labor. According to the Laogai Research Foundation China's government publicly guaranteed to stop the export of slave labor products in October 1991.

    In 1992, China and the United States signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in an effort to enable the US access to information it needed to control its import ban on prison labor products. According to this MOU the Chinese government had committed itself to investigating all claims of slave labor.

    The agreement proved to be worth little in real results, given the profits China stood to lose from its free source of labor the Laogai system provides. Brushing aside requests from the US for answers on the issue, China provides "sanitized" camps for inspectors. Other tactics used to ensure production continues include false holding companies, changing addresses, and mixing labor camp output and non-prison businesses together.

    "Thus, the commercial exploitation of slaves in China's labor camps is effectively an open secret in the world of commerce," says Harry Wu, founder of the Laogai Research Foundation.

    This "open secret" Wu speaks of has become more and more difficult to conceal. Survivors of the Laogai system continue to publicly speak out about the forced labor and torture they have experienced. In addition, organizations such as the Laogai Research Foundation and the World Organization to Investigate the Persecution of Falun Gong continue to investigate the Chinese government's use of slave labor as a source for economic growth and to expose the products manufactured in Laogai.

    Although China continues to currently benefit from its "prison economy," it may ultimately be the world's consumers who control the fate of the Laogai. As the world comes to realize the blood, sweat and tears going into the products they buy it might not be so easy to purchase them no matter how low the price.

    The High Cost of China's Laogai
     
  7. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    96
    Prison represent only small part of industrial output in China. Its pricing of product is insignificantly lower than product from normal factory. Majority of Prison product does not bound to export due to auditing process of foreign importer. Only smaller importer will choose to work with middleman to buy prison product.

    Company like Gap, Levi's and Nike does not work with prison. It is bad for publicity and they do not do it.
     
  8. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    96
    Prison Labors is not slave labor, that is because for prison's order are almost never filled. Not every businessman want to deal with the bureaucracy of prison officials. You can not force prisoner to work too many hours because there just aren't that many order to begin with.
     
  9. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2009
    Messages:
    3,174
    Likes Received:
    423
    My friend, relax. If you spend enough time in india forum, you would understand our indian friends' mindset.
    It is not about what is right or wrong, it is about what you think. After years of waiting and wishing, the gap between these 2 countries become bigger and bigger. They need some kind of explanation which can help them sleep well in the night!
     
  10. t_co

    t_co Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,537
    Likes Received:
    699
    Location:
    China
    lol, so true. Would be nice if DFI and the Indian media didn't have to try to rationalize away the superiority of the Chinese economy at every turn, but alas, humility is the rarest of virtues...
     

Share This Page