Cannot risk a parallel army in North: Basil

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by HeinzGud, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Cannot risk a parallel army in North: Basil

    Cannot risk a parallel army in North: Basil

    Despite India’s efforts to persuade Sri Lanka to fully implement the 13th Amendment in the island’s northern province, the Rajapaksa government appears firm about not handing over some powers, including those related to police and law enforcement, to the Tamil minority.

    Revealing the extent to which absence of trust remains an obstacle to ethnic reconciliation in Sri Lanka, Basil Rajapaksa — brother of President Mahinda Rajapaksa and Minister for Economic Development — who visited New Delhi last week, told The Hindu that Sri Lanka would never risk a provincial government forming its own “army” through devolved police powers.

    Referring to the Tamil National Army — a militant outfit raised by the beleaguered 1988 EPRLF government in the North-Eastern Province in a futile attempt to protect itself against the LTTE that had rejected the Amendment and boycotted the election — he said there was no ruling out that a future Northern provincial government would not do the same: “If [the NPC] form another army, can we afford another war now?”

    He dismissed arguments that armed struggle by the Tamils was now a thing of the past, and that the 13th Amendment in any case gave the President overriding powers over the province.

    As Sri Lanka moves to hold elections for the first time in the Tamil-majority Northern province, there is a raging debate in the country over the pros and cons of the 13th Amendment, including the proposed changes by the Rajapaksa government to strip it of clauses that it perceives to be inimical to national and territorial integrity; and the reported insistence by India on its full implementation.

    Both Mr. Rajapakasa’s trip to New Delhi, and quickly after, India’s National Security Adviser (NSA) Shiv Shankar Menon’s visit to Colombo, seem to have focussed on this issue; for weeks, the Sri Lankan media has been debating it threadbare.

    Sri Lanka’s other provinces, which have functioning governments, do not have their own police forces despite the constitutional provision for this. But the Tamil National Alliance believes the North should have control over law enforcement in the province.

    The TNA is widely expected to win the Northern election, to be held in September, two months before the country is due to host the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meet. The alliance has nominated a respected Colombo-based former judge of the Supreme Court, C. V. Wigneswaran, as its chief ministerial candidate.

    Mr. Rajapaksa, however, questioned TNA’s choice, describing Mr.Wigneswaran as a candidate of “external forces” who did not represent the people of the North.

    Well ahead of the elections, the minister, an important political figure in the Sri Lankan government, who is regarded as the most restrained and diplomatic member of the Rajapaksa clan, was already certain that a TNA government in the North would be on collision course with the Centre.

    The Rajapaksa government, he said, had given the Tamil people, “everything” — roads, railways, water, electricity, schools and hospitals. With nothing left to promise, the minister said, a TNA provincial government would whip up other “emotional issues” that neither it nor the government would be able to deliver.

    Giving a new twist to the Indo-Lanka Accord of 1987 which gave birth to the 13th Amendment to Sri Lanka’s Constitution, Mr. Rajapaksa said devolving police powers would actually amount to going against Accord.

    He pointed to section 2.10 of the Accord which calls for the government to use the “same organisations and mechanisms” for law enforcement and security in the Northern and Eastern provinces as in the rest of the country, saying this meant that there could not be more than one police force for the whole country.

    “It is very clear in the Accord. It says police powers have to be with one police, there is no separate mechanism. So you can’t have a separate police force in the provinces,” Mr. Rajapaksa said.

    The government recently set up a parliamentary select committee to revisit the 13th amendment. Mr. Rajapaksa defended the move, saying no constitutional provision was permanent, and all over the world, it was the practice to make changes in the statute.

    He declined to say if the changes would come before or after the election, calling it an ongoing process. Sometimes, he said, such processes took years.

    The committee has been boycotted by the TNA and the main opposition United National Party (UNP). Moreover, dissenters on the issue within the ruling coalition, such as the Sri Lanka Muslim Congress, are not included in the Committee.

    Mr. Rajapaksa sought to explain questions about the credibility of the incomplete panel by saying it would solicit wider opinion by inviting public testimonies.

    Asked if India-Sri Lanka relations had been affected as a result, Mr. Rajapaksa said both countries “understand each other’s point of view. It is Sri Lanka’s problem, and Sri Lanka must find a solution from Sri Lanka itself”.

    India’s vote against Colombo two years in a row at the Human Rights Council (HRC) in Geneva, he said, had “very badly hurt our relationship” but Sri Lanka had “managed it very well”, understanding that it was due to “internal pressure”.

    Nor had Sri Lanka reacted adversely when Sri Lankan pilgrims and Buddhist priests were attacked in Tamil Nadu.

    “So as two sovereign countries and countries who have been friends for a long time we have to understand each other. Our people have been very understanding of India. India must understand that.”

    India’s Sri Lanka-playing-the China card theory was hardly reasonable, he said, pointing to a recently formed Indian CEO’s forum in Colombo, and the absence of a similar platform for Chinese businessmen in Sri Lanka.

    Rather, said the Minister, it was India that was “playing for America”. As evidence, he pulled out a 2011 visit to Chennai by then U.S Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as linked to the Tamil question in Sri Lanka.

    A peaceful environment in Sri Lanka was good for India and the people of India, not just for the governments but also for the business community, including those from Tamil Nadu, Mr. Rajapaksa said.
     
  2.  
  3. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    6,687
    Likes Received:
    2,357
    If Sinhala do not give Tamils the rights to have their provincial Police Force then they will raise their own underground Army like they had been doing earlier.

    So what is better ? A legal and overt ill armed police or a strong LTTE like underground force ?

    Choice is yours !!
     
    sesha_maruthi27 likes this.
  4. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    How do you suppose they do that...? Do you think Tamils have no other thing than fighting with Sinhalese ? You Indians and specially TN people do not know what is happening around them.
     
  5. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    6,687
    Likes Received:
    2,357
    It is the question of rightful aspiration and desire of people or the elites of a community which needs to be met even if symbolically in a democratic setup. That is what matter more than many other thing.

    We Indians are well wishers of both the Sinhala and the Tamils. So we also know what goes around in both these peoples minds.
     
  6. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Tamils don't even think of going against the government......
     
  7. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    3,273
    Location:
    Modindia
    Then why not let them have a police force?
     
  8. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    6,687
    Likes Received:
    2,357
    Very valid question ?

    Why do not you make them feel that Srilanka is also their country ?
     
  9. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    We do not want it to fall into a hands of the US puppet who intends to fight with the SLG rather than look after their people. Other than that provinces do not need a separate police force. SL is a tiny island even smaller than TN therefore separate police force under a CM won't do any good other than double the current issues we have with the police force.
     
  10. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    So they want to feel SL their country when police force is given to them.... then why not give them the opportunity to create separate armed forces, judiciary and a parliament they will feel more like home then... aren't they?
     
  11. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,754
    Likes Received:
    3,273
    Location:
    Modindia
    Police force is for law enforcement I am not sure how it caan face of against an army, unless you are planning of arming them with tanks. I believe the Sinhalese still don't trust the Tamil after the civil war. But the question is why do they expect the Tamils to trust them then?
     
  12. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    The same argument can be put forward for provincial govt. isn't it?
     
  13. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Well we do trust Tamils but the issue here is the power is about to be vested on a bunch of puppets who neither represent Tamils nor Sinhalese but USA. So we Sinhalese do not want to give powers that could be manipulated to USA to do their bidding.

    About the Tamils trust... actually we do not need Tamils to trust us. Rather we do not care. If Tamils do not trust us, they can jump to the sea. :p
     
  14. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    I do not get it.. can you elaborate it.
     
  15. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    I just wanted to ask whether the logic that SL being a small landmass ( smaller than TN) and doesn't need separate Police force under provincial CM's be taken further to say that SL being a small country ( by area and population) doesn't require a provincial govt. at all?
     
  16. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Indeed we do not need provincial governments at all. This whole fiasco is started with the 13A. Provincial governments are waste of tax payers money. What SL need is a strong regional governess system like gram panchyats.
     
  17. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    Gram panchayats are local governing body and not regional.

    But again to whom will the panchayat report?
     
  18. HeinzGud

    HeinzGud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,961
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Colombo, Sri Lanka
    Exactly it should be local. It should reports to the district secretary.
     
  19. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,884
    Likes Received:
    1,568
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh(INDIA)
    EVOLUTION of species and survival of the fittest is a never ending game......
     
  20. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India


    District secretary is a executive person isn't it?
    Who shall be legislative person/body at that level?

    Is it that you don't want to legislative function at that level or dist. sec. will be given legislative power?


    Don't get me wrong, I simply want to know the top to bottom of hierarchical structure of govt. to be put into place if 13a is repelled.
     
  21. mikhail

    mikhail Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2011
    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    1,096
    Location:
    Land of Intolerance and App Wapsi
    you know one thing,you lankans are damn lucky to have us Indians as your neighbors.this is the sole reason why you even exist as a free country!if you had neighbors like china or pakistan you would have felt the taste of your own medicine because they would never tolerate this kind of attitude from a puny island country like yours:rolleyes:!
     

Share This Page