Bo Xilai and his Trial

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Was Bo Xilai's trial a new dawn or a Party game?

    As China boasted of its new "open" justice in the wake of the Bo Xilai trial, a woman is arrested for simply taking photographs of crowds outside the court.

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    At the exact moment that China's "trial of the century" was reaching its climax, a peculiar and unsettling scene unfolded in the street a few hundred feet from the courtroom.

    Inside, the maverick Chinese politician Bo Xilai, the Politburo member who once thought he might lead China, was coming face to face with his nemesis: Wang Lijun, the disloyal police chief who betrayed him first to American diplomats and then to the Chinese authorities.

    But beyond the double line of policemen blocking the gate to the towering courthouse, beyond the plastic barriers penning in journalists, and beyond a line of red-and-white police tape sealing off the street, a 49-year-old woman was being secretly bundled into the back of a van.

    The woman, Yang Xiuqiong, a wealthy cooking oil merchant and Communist party member, had flown almost 1,000 miles to Jinan from her home city of Mianyang to witness as much of the historic trial as she could.

    She did not see much, but she managed to photograph the motorcade that brought Mr Bo to court with her mobile phone

    She also snapped pictures of the small scuffles between Mr Bo's supporters and the police, as they waved banners calling for justice. Dozens of professional photographers outside the court captured similar scenes.

    Within hours of these mundane photographs appearing on Sky Net, a Chinese website that catalogues problems in the justice system and which asked people to travel to Jinan and record their experiences of Mr Bo's trial, police from her home city had flown to Jinan, hunted her down and arrested her.

    "Lots of people went. We told them just to take photographs and not to say anything or voice any opinions," said Huang Qi, a spokesman for Sky Net.

    "They have charged her with leaking national secrets. This may be the first case in China of a person facing criminal charges for taking pictures of a crowd."

    In the wake of Mr Bo's trial, Chinese propaganda claimed that it had been a "watershed" moment for the Chinese justice system that "marked the Communist party's resolve to push forward the rule of law".

    Mr Bo could face the death penalty if convicted for corruption and embezzlement and also faces a charge of abusing his power after he allegedly fired Wang Lijun, his police chief and tried to cover up the murder of Neil Heywood, a British businessman, by his wife Gu Kailai.

    An editorial by Xinhua, the state news agency, said that a decision to allow the public to read transcripts from the court stenographer, tweeted while the trial was in progress, gave people "a rare opportunity to tell right from wrong".

    But the detention of Mrs Yang lays bare how Mr Bo's trial, while unprecedented in many ways, should not be seen as a sign of any meaningful reform.

    Chinese intellectuals have noted that the trial, like the downfall of the Gang of Four after the Cultural Revolution, is merely the outcome of a power struggle within the Communist party as Xi Jinping, the new president, consolidated his power, rather than a sign that the system is changing.

    That struggle may still be continuing: on Friday reports emerged that Zhou Yongkang, China's former security tsar and a rank higher than Mr Bo, may be the next target.

    At no stage were any serious questions asked, they said. From where did Mr Bo derive the power to crush his opponents and rise to the top? What kind of political party promotes leaders like Mr Bo? Why does China's political machine operate with such impunity and in near total secrecy? What reforms could stop such abuses?

    Any dissidents who dare to touch on such uncomfortable areas are instantly detained: more than 100 have disappeared in the past few months.

    Even as the authorities used Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, to stage a simulacrum of a real trial, they busily scrubbed any dissenting voices from the record. Of the 4,000 comments left on the Weibo account of Jinan court on the first day of the trial, only 22 were displayed.

    Zhang Hongliang, a university professor in Beijing, saw his account closed after he posted: "Bo Xilai did not fail the people, and the people have not given up on him".

    After 18 months of suspense, however, Mr Bo's trial certainly did provide a show for the masses. As the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei noted last week: "No preordained script could have come up with such a deliciously twisted drama."

    The trial began with accusations that businessmen had greased Mr Bo's palm in order to win his support for a skyscraper project in the southern city of Shenzhen.

    For the public, it was the first time that the Party, in releasing the court transcript, has acknowledged the incredibly cosy relationship between businesses and politicians.

    Tang Xiaolin, an old friend from Mr Bo's Cultural Revolution days, not only allegedly left bags of bank notes sitting on his sofa, he also brought him hair conditioner from Hong Kong, electronic gadgets and toys for his son.

    As the trial progressed, these titillating titbits began to pile up: the delicacies brought back from a holiday in Africa by Mr Bo's son, the £8,000 Segway bought as a present that Mr Bo took out for a spin, the 76 flights paid for his son and wife, the private jet to Kilimanjaro, all financed by the largesse of a billionaire businessman, Xu Ming.

    Ordinary Chinese are all too aware of the gilded lives that their leaders enjoy: they watch them drive past in luxury cars every day. But here it was for the first time in black and white, a delicious reality show. "Even the worst television soap opera could not come up with such a plot!" Mr Bo exclaimed in his defence.

    By the time the trial developed, on its last day, into a tale of a deadly love triangle between Mr Bo, his wife Gu Kailai, and his Police Chief Wang Lijun, everyone watching had been distracted from the worrying questions that the trial had failed to address.

    Why, for example, did the prosecution choose only to present a tiny sliver of Mr Bo's alleged crimes in court?

    "There was no mention of the crimes that Bo Xilai committed in Chongqing apart from his attempt to cover up Neil Heywood's murder," said Li Zhuang, a lawyer whom Mr Bo imprisoned for 18 months after he defended one of the politician's opponents.'

    During Mr Bo's five years of ruling over the central Chinese city of Chongqing, he had thousands of victims arbitrarily detained and many of them tortured, sometimes fatally, to extract false confessions before seizing their assets. Any judges or lawyers who opposed his version of "justice" were intimidated or jailed. So imperious was Mr Bo that he even reportedly ordered the electronic surveillance of top Communist party leaders such as former president, Hu Jintao.

    "Hundreds of victims of his campaigns called me after the trial and voiced their dissatisfaction and anger at the court," said Mr Li. "What he did in Chongqing in the last four to five years is a sin far greater than what he did in Dalian."

    Mr Li said he was hopeful that these crimes may eventually be aired, but of course to do so would reveal the complicity of other top Communist party leaders.

    Tellingly, he added that when investigators had come to speak to him ahead of Mr Bo's trial, in order to collect evidence, they only asked him about his own case, not about the wider abuses of the regime.

    Mr Bo's trial has also not ended the suffering of many of his victims in Chongqing. The wife of Gao Yingpu, a journalist locked up by Mr Bo, said he was still unable to speak publicly because he has been "stripped of his political rights".

    The wife of Feng Ping, once a high-flying police captain who was targeted towards the end of Mr Bo's "anti-mafia" campaign, and who remains in Chongqing's Yuzhou prison, said she was still unable to speak about his case.

    Deng Jiwei, the former legal consultant of the Chongqing government, said he was still in hospital recovering from the torture he received after being arrested in August 2010. Luckily for him, his trial was delayed several times and, when Wang Lijun, the Chongqing police chief, fled to the United States consulate in March 2012, he was promptly released.

    "Sooner or later, these cases will come to light," he predicted. "When Bo Xilai's case is closed, there will be an official pronouncement on what he did in Chongqing," said Mr Deng.

    Chi Susheng, Mr Deng's old classmate and lawyer, said she had many clients who were tortured under Mr Bo. "I asked the court to reopen these cases many times but always was refused," she said. "The investigators into Bo have not come to me or my clients to ask about his wrong doing," she added.

    Much of the evidence against Mr Bo came in the form of witness statements, but Mr Bo was not able to cross-examine the most important testimony against him, that of his wife Gu Kailai.

    "Mr Bo's repudiation and ridicule of [the testimony of other witnesses], indicated the type of experience Gu had been spared and the extent to which her testimony might have been modified or rebutted on cross-examination," noted Jerome Cohen, a law professor at New York University, in the South China Morning Post.

    Then there remains the question of what was edited out of the court transcript, and whether such a transcript really does represent transparency.

    One obvious edit came when Mr Bo claimed he had been acting on the orders of "higher-ups" when he obtained a medical certificate to show Mr Wang was mad.

    An anonymous post on the internet, claiming to be the record of a "lawyer" who was present in the court, suggested that Mr Bo was threatened several times during his interrogation.

    Mr Bo allegedly told the court that investigators had threatened to hunt down his son, 25-year-old Bo Guagua, and drag him back to China unless he cooperated, the post said, but no such claim appeared in the official transcript.

    When Mr Bo recanted his earlier written statements, he also allegedly claimed he had made them because he had been promised he would be allowed to remain in the Communist party. That too, was not mentioned in the official script.

    Han Deqiang, another prominent supporter of Mr Bo, said the authorities had miscalculated with their "live feed" of the court. "They must feel awkward," he said. "They wanted to show justice was being done, but this is a Western game and Mr Bo is very adept at playing these Western games.

    "Now they have to find him guilty, but if they do, it will contradict the show they have put on for the public, that this is a procedurally just trial."

    Mr Han pointed out that if the Chinese government really wanted transparency, it would have televised the trial live.

    "The updated version of 'censorship' is no longer information blackout, but the dissemination of misinformation," said one source following the trial. "What I think is important is not what has been released, but what has not been released."

    There also remains the intriguing possibility that Mr Bo was himself playing along with the show, as one last grateful nod to the organisation that had been his protector for so long. While his vigorous defence demonstrated the rule of law, he also refrained from criticism of the justice system, or the Party, or even his investigators, and he revealed none of the scandals of other leaders.

    Upon his verdict, in a few weeks time, there is now the prospect that Mr Bo may appeal to a higher court, as he is legally entitled to do. But one thing is certain: if there is an appeal Mrs Yang, the citizen photographer, will not be allowed to witness it. She will still be in jail.

    Additional reporting by Adam Wu

    Was Bo Xilai's trial a new dawn or a Party game? - Telegraph
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bo Xilai trial: wife and police chief ‘in love triangle’


    The most spectacular trial that China has ever witnessed closed with its biggest shock of all as Bo Xilai revealed a tragic love affair between his wife and his city Chongqing’s police chief.

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    Defiant until the end of his trial on charges of corruption and abuse of power, the 64-year-old fallen leader brushed his lawyers aside to make a final oration that displayed all the bravura that made him such a magnetic figure, and caused China’s other leaders such anxiety.

    Behind the biggest drama to hit China's Communist Party since the protests in Tiananmen Square, Mr Bo said, was a story of how Chongqing’s police chief, Wang Lijun, had fallen inexorably in love with his wife, Gu Kailai.

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    When Mr Bo caught the pair, he claimed, the police chief of the city he ruled had fled his wrath, running to the safety of the United States consulate in a city 160 miles away, a treason which led to their mutual downfall.

    “Wang was secretly in love with Gu Kailai for a long time,” Mr Bo told the court, adding that the police chief had declared his passion in a love letter. “In the letter it said he had always had feelings for Kailai and he could not help himself. He even slapped himself in the face eight times.”

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    Former police chief Wang Lijun (Reuters)

    Mr Bo said Wang had visited his home every day because he was drawn to his wife, and suggested the relationship did not go unrequited.

    “They had an extremely special relationship. I was fed up with it,” said Mr Bo. “Gu Kailai even brought Wang’s shoes into my house. I told Zhang Xiaojun (an aide) to get rid of them immediately”.

    But when Mr Bo uncovered the relationship, his city’s police chief knew he had made a potentially fatal mistake. “He knew my character. He hurt my family. He hurt my feelings,” Mr Bo said.

    There had long been rumours in Chongqing that the previously close bond between Mr Bo and Wang was shattered when they became tangled in a love triangle.

    But the allegations by Mr Bo raise new and intriguing questions about the planning of, and the motive for, the murder of Neil Heywood. Wang had previously confessed that he helped Gu plan Mr Heywood’s killing.

    Mr Bo’s tale of mad passion caused an instant sensation on the Chinese internet, with one popular post suggesting that the lovers were doomed from the start: Gu was a Scorpio while Wang was a Capricorn and therefore incompatible.

    Before revealing the drama in his household, Mr Bo had earlier ridiculed the prosecution’s closing statement, saying: “Even the lowest level television soap cannot have this kind of plot,” he said.

    Responding to accusations that he must have been aware of the luxurious lifestyle his family was living, under his nose, Mr Bo asked: “Is Gu Kailai a civilised woman or not?
    “Did she want me to love her or not? Would she have come and bothered me with these trifles every day? I was the governor of Liaoning province,” he added.

    To accusations that his 25-year-old son, Guagua, spent huge sums travelling the world and carousing, Mr Bo said: “If Guagua kept asking for money for fancy watches and cars and international travel, if he wanted us to pay for his friends and owed the bank huge sums of money, would I have loved such a son?”.

    Instead, Mr Bo said, his family was so frugal that he was still wore padded winter trousers that his mother had bought for him in the 1960s.

    Mr Bo also repeated that much of the evidence against him had been coerced.

    “All of the written confessions I signed before were made against my will,” he said, adding that he had hoped, by confessing, to win rehabilitation.

    “I had a hope deep in my heart that I would not be expelled from the Party, I would keep membership and I would keep my political life.”

    It was unclear whether Mr Bo’s impressive rhetoric would win him more public support, with hundreds of thousands of people reading his statement on the live-feed from court.

    But it did little to help his legal case, and his lawyers even admitted that it was only after 2005, when Mr Bo was promoted to higher office, that corruption had stopped. “He woke up,” they said.

    Mr Bo’s defiance may also cost him dearly, in the form of a tougher sentence.

    “He not only denied crimes that have been fully backed up with solid evidence, but he also recanted his earlier testimony,” the prosecutors said. “His attitude is to refuse to confess wrongdoing... he should receive harsh punishment.”

    If convicted, Mr Bo technically faces the death penalty, although a member of China’s Communist Politburo has never been executed.

    As he made his final statement, perhaps the last statement he will ever make in public, Mr Bo said: “I know I am not a perfect man, I am subjective and easily angered. I have made some serious mistakes and problems. I failed to manage my family.”

    The court will reconvene at a later date to reveal the verdict.

    Bo Xilai trial: wife and police chief ‘in love triangle’ - Telegraph
     
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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bo Xilai retells the moment his life fell apart

    He believed he was destined to lead China, but Bo Xilai was forced to retell the devastating moment his life fell apart – when he learned of the murder of Neil Heywood.


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    On an unscheduled third day, the trial of the still defiant 64-year-old politician reached its crescendo as Mr Bo was accused of abusing his power to fire Wang Lijun, his police chief, and cover up the murder of Mr Heywood, who had managed some of the family's overseas business for years.

    For the first time, Mr Bo revealed his confusion and rage when he learned that his wife, Gu Kailai, might have been involved in Mr Heywood's murder, a transgression that would leave both him and his wife in prison and his 25-year-old son in seemingly permanent exile.

    As the red mist descended, Mr Bo miscalculated, he admitted, sending his police chief fleeing to the safety of the United States consulate in Chengdu and setting into motion the chain of events that led to his downfall.

    "I failed to handle this issue calmly at the critical moment and I judged the situation wrongly so I hold part of the responsibility for the Wang Lijun's flight. I am deeply ashamed," he said.

    On January 28, 2012, the first day after the Chinese New Year celebrations and 10 weeks after Mr Heywood's death in a hotel room, Mr Bo returned to Chongqing from Beijing.

    In the afternoon, he told the court that his police chief, Mr Wang, had paid him a visit and told him for the first time that "some people had said" his wife, Gu Kailai, was "connected to the Heywood case".

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    (L-R): Former Chongqing Municipality Communist Party Secretary Bo Xilai, Bo's wife Gu Kailai and British busieness man Neil Heywood

    When he questioned his wife however, she was adamant that Mr Wang, until then her closest ally in Chongqing, had "slandered her".

    "She was furious," said Mr Bo. "She said Wang Lijun was behind it [the rumour]. She showed me a certificate from the police bureau saying Neil Heywood died of a heart attack due to drinking too much. On it was the signature and fingerprint of Heywood's wife."

    Without pausing to question how his wife had managed to obtain Mr Heywood's death certificate, Mr Bo worked himself into a rage that his police chief was plotting against his family.

    "I spent the whole night thinking. In my mind Gu Kailai was a vulnerable woman who could not possibly have killed someone. There had been no conflict before between her and Wang. I felt he had some other scheme in his mind," said Mr Bo.

    What further convinced Mr Bo, he said, was Mr Wang's roundabout method for telling him the news, saying that the revelation had emerged in the resignation letters of two subordinates.

    "Why would he ask others to write it in a letter rather than him writing it himself?" Mr Bo wondered to himself.

    Mr Bo said he had confronted Mr Wang the following day in his office, asking him outright if he was trying to frame his wife. "He seemed very awkward and he did not say anything," said Mr Bo. "I used some angry words but I cannot recall them".

    According to Mr Bo, he slapped Mr Wang in front of two subordinates and then smashed a glass. According to Mr Wang, however, Mr Bo walked up from behind his desk and punched him in the face.

    Taking the stand in the court room in the afternoon, Mr Wang defied cross examination from his former boss, as both men sought to impress upon the judges their very differing versions of the events.

    "It was not a slap. My body shook and when he went back to his desk I was bleeding from the corner of my mouth and fluid was leaking from my ear," Mr Wang told the court.

    "I calmly said to him we need to face the situation and he smashed a glass on the ground and said I will never accept this. He tried to hit me again but [one of the subordinates] who was also there held him back."

    For a while, the two men stepped back from the brink, each assessing their position.

    According to Mr Bo, his police chief tried to calm the situation in a second meeting later that day.

    "Wang said to me: 'Don't be angry. Neil, who was killed, was not a good guy, let us put this aside. Besides, this case has been closed in the police station. I will talk to Gua's mother (Gu Kailai) again.'"

    After that, Mr Bo said, "I didn't say too much and let it go".

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    Wang Lijun, the onetime police chief of Chongqing

    Mr Bo, who is facing a charge that he unlawfully removed Mr Wang from his position as police chief and deputy mayor, said Mr Wang had previously expressed a desire for a new job and that Chen Cungen, a member of Chongqing's standing committee, had reassured him that special dispensation could be used.

    Mr Wang, however, said Mr Bo had systematically tried to cover up his wife's murder and demanded he hand over two hard drives containing the police investigation into Mr Heywood's death.

    A week later, Mr Wang said he felt he had to flee Chongqing after noticing that all of his colleagues, and everyone who had investigated Mr Heywood's death, had suddenly gone missing. "It was very dangerous," he said to the court.

    Upon learning, in the middle of the night, of Mr Wang's flight, Mrs Gu suggested to her husband that they ask the local hospital to issue a certificate proving the police chief was insane, in order to protect themselves.

    The trial continues.

    Bo Xilai retells the moment his life fell apart - Telegraph
     
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  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bo Xilai calls former aide a 'vile liar'


    Ousted senior Chinese politician Bo Xilai has angrily lashed out at his former police chief on the fourth day of his trial, calling him a "vile character" who faked testimony accusing Bo of covering up a murder committed by his wife.


    Bo was a rising star in China's leadership circles when his career was stopped short last year by a murder scandal which saw his wife Gu Kailai convicted of poisoning a British businessman.

    He is now on trial charged with corruption, taking bribes and abuse of power, the last of which is especially sensitive as it involves allegations Bo challenged the authority of the ruling Communist Party.

    Despite Bo's feisty defence, a guilty verdict is a foregone conclusion as China's courts are controlled by the Communist Party. State media, which speaks for the party, has already all but condemned him.

    Since the trial began on Thursday in eastern Jinan city, Bo has repeatedly said he is not guilty of any wrongdoing and has called his wife's testimony against him the ravings of a mad woman.

    On Sunday, Bo rebutted earlier testimony from his former police chief Wang Lijun, who carried out Bo's crackdown on crime and gangs in Chongqing, where Bo was Communist Party chief.

    Wang said he had told Bo that his wife Gu, once a glamorous lawyer, had murdered British businessman Neil Heywood.

    "During Wang Lijun's testimony he is continuing to lie obviously, and what he is saying is totally unreliable, it is full of deception, he's just mouthing off," Bo told the court, according to the court's official microblog.

    "He has a vile character, spreading rumours here and muddying the waters."

    Wang said when he told Bo that Gu had poisoned Heywood, Bo was furious and punched him on his left ear, leaving him "bleeding from the mouth", according to Wang's testimony on Saturday. Wang said Bo did not accept Gu's involvement in the murder and had illegally sacked him.

    "He said it was not a slap but a punch, but I've never learned how to box and have no great strength to strike out," Bo said.

    Wang fled to the US consulate in the nearby city of Chengdu in February last year after confronting Bo with evidence about Gu, according to official accounts.

    After first helping Gu evade suspicion of poisoning Heywood, Wang hushed up evidence of the murder, according to the official account of Wang's trial. Wang has also been convicted and jailed over Heywood's murder.

    On Saturday, Bo admitted to shaming his country and poorly handling a defection attempt by Wang, but Bo denied trying to protect his wife from the murder accusation by Wang.

    Bo Xilai calls former aide a 'vile liar' - Telegraph
     
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  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bo Xilai trial painted 'grimy picture of how Chinese leaders get rich'

    Bo Xilai quickly dispelled any notion that his time in a secret jail cell had broken his spirit, according to Malcolm Moore.


    Three hours after his trial began, the first photograph of Bo Xilai in 18 months appeared.

    But while China’s most charismatic politician appeared slightly greyer and a little worn, under the shadow of the policemen looming on either side, he quickly dispelled any notion that his time in a secret jail cell had broken his spirit.

    Outside the courthouse, it was business as usual. Thuggish police bundled away any sign of dissent, journalists were tracked and blocked from the trial. Plain clothes cops infiltrated the onlookers.

    But inside the court, an extraordinary and unprecedented decision was taken; through a comprehensive live feed from the court stenographer, the outside world was allowed to see what was really unfolding.

    It was a dangerous gamble. Aside from whether Mr Bo would stick to the script (he did not), the testimonies revealed to the public a grimy picture of how Chinese leaders get rich and how tightly business and politics are interwoven.

    One witness described how Dalian, the Chinese city where Mr Bo was once mayor, had set up a shell company in Hong Kong which was then given a parcel of land in another city, Shenzhen, for a multi-million pound skyscraper development. Everyone’s wheel was greased.

    Then there was a glimpse into the dark maw of the Party’s interrogation machine. Mr Bo revealed that “for the most part”, his guards had been polite and that he had been fed “adequately”. But in his cell there was no shortage of “mental” pressure, he said, and he was eventually coerced into a confession.

    While the Chinese public is well aware of how the Party takes a cut of every business deal and tortures its foes, physically or mentally, seeing the testimonies spelled out in black and white still shocked.

    Perhaps the authorities believed they could appear transparent, while live tweeting, but maintain control over what was broadcast.

    Perhaps after all this time, and with Mr Bo still refusing to cooperate, the Party gambled that it had to put him on trial and let the evidence against him speak for itself. Perhaps on the second day of his trial the evidence will be more concrete and compelling.

    One of Mr Bo’s fiercest critics, the lawyer Li Zhuang who he jailed in Chongqing, said Mr Bo had dazzled, but left himself open to further attack.

    "He and his lawyer said his wife had more than 40 million yuan before 2000,” said Mr Li. “Now what happens if someone looks into her tax records and finds she did not pay enough?" "People who know a bit of law could tell that many of his statements were illogical,” he added.

    But so far the Party’s gamble has not paid off. Even if Mr Bo is convicted, his performance will have convinced many of the 250,000 people following the case on the internet that he is innocent.

    The triviality of some of the evidence against him, the odd £8,000 bribe here and there, pales into insignificance now that we know the family of China’s former premier, Wen Jiabao, amassed £1.7 billion.

    And Mr Bo’s supporters are likely to be galvanised. Far from neatly closing a door on Mr Bo’s political future, the first day of his trial has left open the possibility that this saga has more twists in it yet.

    Bo Xilai trial painted 'grimy picture of how Chinese leaders get rich' - Telegraph
     
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  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Sex, intrigues, drama all rolled in one in China.

    A great story for a thrilling film!
     
  8. CCTV

    CCTV Regular Member

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    Basically, we just catched a US spy.

    Bo's elder son is a US citizen, younger son is in New York under US 's " protection"....
     
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  9. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    it took a while for Ray to process all the information.

    Sent from my HUAWEI T8951 using Tapatalk 2
     
  10. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    i am not sure what messages these articles intent to convey. on one hand, they insinuated that Bo was an innocent man who was framed by CCP, on the other hand, the articles took every testimony against Bo as fact and made implications about corruptions within CCP.

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  11. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    So the CCP did not knew what was happening just under their nose ??
     
  12. CCTV

    CCTV Regular Member

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    Well , we have to collect enough evidence first.
     
  13. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Did CCP got enough evidence of USA's protection of the guy's son ?? In most of the high profile cases CCP does not wait for evidence...
     
  14. CCTV

    CCTV Regular Member

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    He is a playboy but went to Oxford , Harvard, Columbia . Do you need more evidences?
     
  15. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Is this all evidence CCP has collected ??? Oxford,Harward & Columbia are places where people go to learn...
     
  16. CCTV

    CCTV Regular Member

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    What are you trying to say?

    For me, it is clear enough. I don't know what evidence CCP on hand.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2013
  17. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    BBC News - China media: Bo Xilai verdict

    The upcoming verdict in the case of disgraced former top politician Bo Xilai is dominating the Hong Kong media, while mainland papers discuss the sentencing of a mother over the death of her children.

    The Jinan Intermediate People's Court in eastern China announced on Wednesday that it will deliver a verdict on former Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai's corruption case at 10:00 local time (06:00 GMT) on Sunday.

    A letter allegedly written by Mr Bo to his family is at the centre of discussion in Hong Kong's media. Unidentified insiders with close ties to the Bo family have confirmed to Hong Kong's South China Morning Post that a defiant letter allegedly written by Mr Bo to his family is genuine.

    Earlier this week, Boxun News Network, an overseas-based dissident Chinese news website, published the letter allegedly sent to Mr Bo's relatives, dated 12 September.

    In the letter, Mr Bo thanks his relatives for attending his corruption trial in August."This is truly an injustice, but someday this will be cleared up. I will quietly wait in prison. Dad sat in prison several times in his life. I will follow his example!"

    Mr Bo's late father, Bo Yibo, an influential Communist Party elder, was jailed at least twice and persecuted during the Cultural Revolution (1966-76) before returning to power in the late 1970s.

    Speculation over Mr Bo's sentence is also growing in the Hong Kong press.

    Wang Yukai, a professor at Beijing's National Academy of Governance, a civil service training school, tells Ta Kung Pao, a Beijing-backed Hong Kong daily, that Mr Bo is likely to be sentenced to 20 years in prison, and that the expected maximum sentence will be life imprisonment.

    In other news, there has been an outpouring of sympathy in many newspapers for a 22-year-old drug addict mother whose two girls starved to death after being left alone at home with the door and windows blocked, in the eastern city of Nanjing.

    At a trial on Wednesday, the mother, Yue Yan, was sentenced to life imprisonment for intentional homicide. She escaped the death penalty because she is pregnant.

    "The last time before leaving, I left three to five days' worth of food and a pot of water with the children. I had originally intended to go out for two or three days, but ultimately I could not resist the temptation of drugs and online games and stayed outside," Yue Yan is quoted by the Beijing Times as saying.

    The Beijing News expresses sympathy for Yue Yan, who was herself born to unmarried parents and left in the care of her grandparents.

    Many newspapers say the authorities should have intervened earlier as neighbours had already raised concerns about Yue Yan locking the girls unattended in a bedroom for days while she took drugs outside.

    Despite supporting the sentencing of Yue Yan, the Guangzhou Daily criticises the authorities for "indifference" and failing to intervene sooner in families with children left uncared for by their parents.

    "Minors without care or suitable care, such as the children of drug addicts and prisoners, are not uncommon and are a huge social group... Yue Yan's unborn child will soon face the problem of having no supervised care when it is born," says a commentary in the Beijing Youth Daily.

    'Bigger role in Syria'
    Turning to international news, the official Xinhua news agency welcomes talks between Chinese President Xi Jinping and visiting Jordanian King Abdullah II, highlighting the king's call for China to play a bigger role in resolving the Syrian crisis and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

    Meanwhile, the Southern Metropolis Daily says a man has been arrested on suspicion of injuring Zong Qinghou, founder of China's beverage giant Hangzhou Wahaha Group and one of China's richest men, in a knife attack in the eastern city of Hangzhou last Friday.

    Police said the suspect, 49, an unemployed man surnamed Yang, sought out Mr Zong near his home and asked him for a job.

    He then allegedly attacked Mr Zou with a knife when his request was turned down. Mr Zong reportedly suffered severe injuries to his left hand.

    The China Youth Daily expresses disbelief at how 45 county authorities in nine provinces and municipalities managed to "misappropriate" more than 1.6bn yuan (£162m; $261m) in "social support fees" or fines on families who break the one-child policy by having more than one child.

    The "social support fee" is supposed to provide state revenue for resources and public services used by the child.

    The Beijing News says a national audit uncovered that the county authorities misreported the number of extra children born, failed to collect the fees, and undercharged or overcharged fines.
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Bo Xilai will face a kangaroo court, but the kangaroo will not dare do much to him!

    He may spill the beans is the danger!
     
    W.G.Ewald likes this.

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