Attack on Church in France Kills Priest, and ISIS Is Blamed

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by sorcerer, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Attack on Church in France Kills Priest, and ISIS Is Blamed


    ARIS — Two men stormed a parish church in northern France on Tuesday morning and took several hostages, killing a priest and critically injuring another person, before the attackers were shot by the police, officials said.

    President François Hollande said that the Islamic State was behind the attack, the latest in a series of assaults that have left Europe stunned, fearful and angry.

    Mr. Hollande spoke after traveling with Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve to the town where the attack occurred, St.-Étienne-du-Rouvray, a suburb of Rouen that has about 29,000 inhabitants and is about 65 miles northwest of Paris.

    Terrorism and Attacks By BFM, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS 1:17
    Official on French Church Attack
    Video
    Official on French Church Attack
    Pierre-Henry Brandet, an Interior Ministry spokesman, described what French law enforcement encountered on Tuesday during a hostage incident at a church, in which a priest was killed.
    Prime Minister Manuel Valls expressed horror at what he called “a barbaric attack on a church,” adding: “The whole of France and all Catholics are wounded. We will stand together.”

    The Interior Ministry confirmed the death of one man and said another person had been critically injured.

    Archbishop Dominique Lebrun of Rouen, in a statement from Krakow, Poland, where he and other Roman Catholic leaders were gathered for the World Youth Day celebration, identified the victim as the Rev. Jacques Hamel, the auxiliary priest at the church.

    Terrorism and Attacks By REUTERS 00:50
    Hollande on Attack at French Church

    Hollande on Attack at French Church
    President François Hollande of France says that his country needs to fight the war against Islamic State “by all our means.”

    Reached on his cellphone, the parish priest, the Rev. Auguste Moanda-Phuati, 50, said that he was rushing back to the church from a vacation near Paris and that Father Hamel was assigned to celebrate Mass on Tuesday.

    Archbishop Lebrun and other church officials gave Father Hamel’s age as 84, but the archdiocese’s website said he had been born in 1930 and ordained in 1958.

    The Rev. Federico Lombardi, a spokesman for the Vatican, said that Pope Francis was horrified at the “barbaric killing” of a priest and issued “the most severe condemnation of all forms of hatred.”

    [​IMG]
    France


    The attack in France, and the ensuing police response, unfolded rapidly.

    At 10:56 a.m., the National Police urged residents via Twitter to keep away from the scene and not enter a security perimeter that had been established around the church. At 11:15 a.m., the police said that the crisis was over, with two hostage-takers “neutralized.”

    About an hour later, an Interior Ministry spokesman, Pierre-Henry Brandet, told reporters in Paris that the two attackers had entered the church — it was not immediately clear whether the Mass had ended — armed with weapons. “Were they knives, were they handguns, it’s much too early to say,” he said.

    The Rouen unit of the B.R.I., a police team that specializes in major crimes like armed robberies and kidnappings, “arrived extremely quickly and positioned itself around the church.” The two hostage-takers left the church and were shot by the police, Mr. Brandet said. A police bomb squad searched the church to make sure it had not been booby-trapped. Counselors were sent to provide aid to three hostages who were rescued and who were not physically injured.

    According to Father Moanda-Phuati, the parish priest, the church’s Tuesday Mass begins at 9 a.m. and lasts for about half an hour. Because of the summer holidays, attendance would have been low — fewer than 10 people, he estimated.

    France has had three major terrorist attacks in the space of 19 months: an assault on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and other locations around Paris in January 2015, which killed 17 people; coordinated attacks on a soccer stadium, the Bataclan concert hall, and cafes and restaurants in and around Paris on Nov. 13, which killed 130 people; and a rampage on July 14 in the southern city of Nice by a man who rammed a cargo truck into a Bastille Day crowd and shot at the police with a handgun, killing 84 people.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/27/world/europe/france-church-hostages.html?_r=0
     
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  3. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Elderly priest killed in French church, attack claimed by Islamic State


    A priest in his mid-80s was killed with a knife and another hostage seriously wounded on Tuesday in an attack on a church in northern France carried out by assailants linked to Islamic State.

    Both attackers were shot dead by French police. Five people in all had been taken hostage. A police source said it appeared that the priest had his throat slit.

    Speaking at the scene of the attack in the Normandy town of Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, French President Francois Hollande said France should "use all its means" in its war against the militant group, against which France has launched air strikes in Syria and Iraq.

    The president called it a "dreadful terrorist attack" and told reporters the attackers had pledge allegiance to IS. The IS news agency Amaq said two of its "soldiers" had carried out the attack.

    "We are put to the test yet again, Hollande said. "The threat remains very high."

    The attack is the latest in a string of deadly assaults in Europe, including the mass killing in Nice, southern France, on Bastille Day and four incidents in Germany.

    Many of the attacks have had links to Islamist militants and IS has called for supporters to target countries that it has been fighting, mainly in Iraq and Syria.

    Tuesday's attack took place during morning mass at the Saint-Etienne parish church, south of Rouen in Normandy.

    The investigation was handed to the anti-terrorist unit of the Paris prosecutor's office.


    SLAIN PRIEST

    The Archbishop of Rouen identified the slain priest as Father Jacques Hamel and said he was 84, although others sources suggest he was born in 1930. The Vatican condemned what it said was a "barbarous killing".

    French Interior Ministry spokesman Pierre-Henry Brandet told France Info radio that the perpetrators have been killed by France's BRI, an elite police anti-crime force, when they came out of the church.

    Bomb squad officers aided by sniffer dogs scoured the church for any possible explosives.

    Prime Minister Manuel Valls branded the attack "barbaric" and said it was a blow to all Catholics and the whole of France.

    "We will stand together," Valls said on Twitter.

    The attack will heap yet more pressure on Hollande to regain control of national security, with France already under a state of emergency 10 months ahead of a presidential election.



    The Normandy attack came 12 days after a 31-year-old Tunisian Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel plowed his heavy goods truck into a crowd of revelers in the French Riviera city of Nice, killing 84 people. Islamic State claimed that attack.

    "Horror. Everything is being done to trigger a war of religions," tweeted Jean-Pierre Raffarin, a former conservative prime minister who now heads the Senate's foreign affairs committee.

    Hollande visited the scene with Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, meeting members of the emergency services.

    Cazeneuve has come under fire from Conservative politicians for not doing enough to prevent the Bastille Day Nice attack.

    French lawmakers approved a six-month extension of emergency rule after the July 14 attack while the Socialist government also said it would step up strikes against Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-hostages-idUSKCN1060VA
     
  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Why Do So Many Attacks of Huge Magnitude Occur In France Than In Other European Countries?

    Jihad and the French Exception
    by Kelly Blair

    PARIS
    — Whether Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, who killed more than 80 people during Bastille Day celebrations in Nice, was an agent of the Islamic State or an unhinged loner who borrowed the group’s jihadist symbols, the slaughter raises the same fundamental question: Why do so many more attacks of this magnitude occur in France than in other European countries?

    Belgium has also been hit recently, but less often. In Britain and Spain no terrorist attack has killed more than 10 people in over a decade. In Germany, there hasn’t been a major attack at all.
    Failures in the French security and intelligence services cannot account for the difference, because communication problems afflict such services throughout Europe. The answer lies elsewhere: When it comes to jihad, too, there is a French exception.

    France’s distinctiveness arises in part from the ideological strength of the idea the nation has had of itself since the French Revolution, including an assertive form of republicanism and an open distrust of all religions, beginning, historically, with Catholicism. This model has been knocked around over the years, first by decolonization, then by decades of economic hardship, the growing stigmatization of cultural differences, the fervent individualism of new generations and globalization, which has narrowed the state’s room for maneuver.

    Above all, France hasn’t been able to solve the problem of economic and social exclusion. Its system, which is too protective of those people who have jobs and not open enough to those who don’t, breeds angst all around. Young people in the banlieues (suburbs), marginalized and with few prospects, feel like victims. They become prime targets for jihadist propaganda, often after a stint in prison for petty crimes.

    Neither Germany nor Britain faces the banlieues phenomenon, at least not on such a scale. The German town of Dinslaken, which is partly ghettoized, has become a hotbed of Islamist radicalization. The same goes for Dewsbury, in West Yorkshire, and the Molenbeek district of Brussels. But France seems to alienate many more of its citizens and residents, well beyond those who actually join the Islamic State.

    One reason is that France’s vision of citizenship, which strongly insists on adherence to a few exalted political values, has seriously eroded over time. By the 1980s, the republican ideal was floundering: It had promised equal opportunity, and that now seemed to be in short supply. The French Communist Party, which had long brought dignity to disadvantaged groups by proposing to fight injustice through class struggle, also greatly weakened during that period, partly because of the demise of the Soviet Union.

    Postwar Germany, on the other hand, chose a far more modest and prudent vision: economic progress. Today, Germany has a rather muted foreign policy toward the Muslim world, and it displays no desire to unite all its citizens around universal principles. Britain isn’t trying to create a monocultural society either. It has opted for multiculturalism, which can abide hyphenated identities and communal behavior.

    France, however, remains resolutely universalist and claims it still has both the desire and the power to enforce inclusion. Yet its assimilationist ambitions are increasingly at odds with everyday reality, and this growing gap is a source of pervasive distress.

    And so the strength — the weight — of France’s national identity has become a problem. It only heightens the discontent of young people with foreign origins, especially North Africans or their descendants, all the more so because the Maghreb’s decolonization occurred in pain and humiliation: When France withdrew from Algeria, it left behind hundreds of thousands dead and created scars in the collective unconscious that remain to this day. British decolonization seems almost painless in comparison.

    Certainly, Britons and Germans also express fears about immigration and Islam. Such concerns help explain Brexit. Acts of sexual harassment in Cologne around the new year, apparently committed by immigrants, sparked a heated debate in Germany (and beyond). But both Britain and Germany give non-local minorities ample leeway to publicly express and practice their religious and communal preferences.

    France insists — in the name of republicanism — that religion should remain a strictly private affair. An ideological nation par excellence, it focuses on symbolic issues like wearing headscarves or holding collective prayers in public places. But restricting such practices causes wounds that go much deeper than the prohibitions themselves: It allows Islamists to exaggerate the implications and accuse France of Islamophobia. In fact, France is no more Islamophobic than its neighbors; it’s just more frontal in the way it handles Islam in the public sphere.

    French-style integration has had some successes. Most notable among them is a high rate of mixed marriages. The French public school system, by helping uplift the lower classes and, therefore, many children of North African parents, has also been a tool of integration (although lately it has seemed less effective). Sometimes precisely because they have faced prejudice in the job market, which has long been stifled by unemployment, children of immigrants have found refuge in state institutions like the army and the police, which recruit through anonymous competitive exams.

    Although France has managed to integrate many immigrants and their descendants, those it has left on the sidelines are more embittered than their British or German peers, and many feel insulted in their Muslim or Arab identity. Laïcité, France’s staunch version of secularism, is so inflexible it can appear to rob them of dignity. An additional factor is France’s muscular foreign policy, which seems to target mostly Muslim countries, such as Libya, Syria and Mali.
    France’s model of integration is generous in its principles but too rigid in its practice. The realities of French society today call for a more pragmatic and flexible approach, with fewer ideological diktats and less anxiety about plurality. France isn’t what it used to be, and it’s time it came to terms with that idea.

    Source>>
    :doh:
     
  5. Sakal Gharelu Ustad

    Sakal Gharelu Ustad Detests Jholawalas Moderator

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    In one word give them "sickularism"!!!
     
  6. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    getting common and is not a good sight to see on television and also read.
     
  7. OneGrimPilgrim

    OneGrimPilgrim Senior Member Senior Member

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    whr invaders hv been eulogised, heroes binned!!
  8. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    People often talk about freedom and human rights etc. Actually people should talk about Justice. If you do proper justice to sufferers, society shall improve. We let Kashmiri goons off for their crime against the pundits. So their morale got boosted and now they want to kill police and army. To bring them to justice and punish is the only way. These people takes undue advantage of freedom of speech and liberty. France is just a champion of liberty and freedom. They never talked about justice and bring to justice those who spreads venom on the name of freedom. We did that with Zakir naik. Soon as some one threats of killing of any individual or speak against the unity of nation or insult the national flag or constitution, he must be brought to justice, Coward BJP is doing worse than congress in this area.
     
    OneGrimPilgrim likes this.
  9. OneGrimPilgrim

    OneGrimPilgrim Senior Member Senior Member

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    whr invaders hv been eulogised, heroes binned!!
    that'll also drive home the message to the fifth columnists & their jhola publications!

    IE is today worried about Kashmiri stone-pelters' struggles against blindness!

    the discourse of Mahabharat on the importance of 'chastisement' is so relevant!!
     
  10. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    RIP, France is witnessing to many attack, next govt. is most probably going to right wing.
    @BON PLAN @Tactical Frog
     
  11. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    When your enemies are uncivilized, this big principles and morale has got no value. They understand only one language and you need to talk them in the language they understand.
     
  12. OneGrimPilgrim

    OneGrimPilgrim Senior Member Senior Member

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    whr invaders hv been eulogised, heroes binned!!
    that's what the Mahabharat talks about! no consideration for the extent of civility of the enemy.
     
  13. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    The news says that the Priest was beheaded which is shocking since now ISIS is beheading people in western countries.The Terrorists yelled ALLAH HU AKBAR but we all know Islam is a religion of peace.

    Seems like EU has no answer to this, they didn't even say its a Terrorist attack and forget about admitting "MUSLIMS did it" since it would not be politically correct.

    It's a very significant attack. This incident is actually war on Christianity by Muslims, can Christians do any Crusade against Muslims which they did ages ago? Or they are so pussified?

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    @Gabriel92 : These attacks are becoming normal in EU now and EU is Terrorized.


    What according to you is EU's strategy now? More "Refugee Welcome" ? :hmm:
     
  14. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Yes! "we can do it"

    BERLIN—German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she wouldn’t budge from her policy of accepting refugees despite two terror attacks by asylum applicants in the space of a week. Ms. Merkel, interrupting her vacation on Thursday to hold a news conference in Berlin, repeated her “We can do it” mantra from last August, when thousands of migrants seeking asylum were entering Germany daily. That conviction, she said, also applied to the challenge of terrorism. While she presented a nine-point plan to address that risk, she insisted that Germany would continue to shelter people fleeing violence. “For me it is clear: we will stick to our fundamental principles,” Ms. Merkel said, quoting the guarantee that “human dignity shall be inviolable” in Germany’s constitution. “These principles mean we will give asylum to those who are politically persecuted and we will give protection to those who flee war and expulsion according to the Geneva Refugee Convention.” Ms. Merkel’s comments were her first after a suicide bombing in southern Germany on Sunday that capped a week of violence that rattled this country’s sense of security. The bombing in the town of Ansbach, which injured 15, and an ax attack earlier last week that injured five, were both carried out by asylum applicants who were apparently followers of radical Islam.


    Read more:
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel Stands Firm on Migrant Policy After Terrorist Attacks
     
  15. airtel

    airtel Senior Member Senior Member

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    soon sickular media will post news like this .............. Zaid Hamid Best ComedianMother.jpg
     
  16. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Politics at large. Political fuctions dont want to admit the fact that they have screwed up big time.
    They must be scared that their own HUMAN RIGHTS watch dogs will haunt them if they take the stance against terrorists where any refugee can be a future potential terrorist groomed by social media.
     

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