Astra BVRAAM

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Apr 7, 2010.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://beta.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/article41575.ece

    Captive flight trials of Astra missile carried out

    India’s missile programme took a crucial step forward on Saturday with Indian Air Force test pilots carrying out the captive flight trials of the indigenously designed and developed Astra beyond visual range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM).

    A Su-30MKI combat aircraft especially tasked for the trials took off from Air Force Station Lohegaon (Pune) for a 90-minute sortie with the Astra missile. Till Thursday, four sorties, including flying the missile to super sonic speeds and to 7Gs, had been accomplished. Captive trials are mandatory to actual firing of the missile from the aircraft.

    The active, radar homing Astra -- India’s first air-to-air missile -- which, at its design altitude of 15 km, will enable fighter pilots to lock-on, evade radar and shoot down enemy aircraft about 80 km away, is part of India’s Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme and has been under development at a number of defence laboratories led by the Hyderabad-based Defence Research and Development Laboratory.

    Astra can be compared to the U.S.’ AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile, or AMRAAM, France’s MICA (Missile d’interception et de combat aérien, “Interception and Aerial Combat Missile”) and Russia’s R77 (RVV-AE) missile.

    The ground launch of Astra was successfully conducted at Chandipur-on-Sea, off the Orissa coast in September 2008.

    Captive flight trials involve the Su-30MKI carrying under its wings at one of its six hard points (stations designated for the carrying of stores) an inert missile (with no explosives but simulating the real missile) which has not been electrically or electronically ‘connected’ to the aircraft’s on-board systems.

    Captive or aero mechanical integrity tests allows a verification of aspects such as the mechanical, structural and electrical compatibility between the missile and the aircraft, and whether vibrations, strain, stress, etc. are within design levels.

    Only after the missile is proven in captive flight trials can it be fired from an aircraft.

    Disclosing news of Phase 1 of the captive flight trails which have come after about four years of planning and certification, senior officials said the trials would cover the entire flight envelope of the Su-30MKI, including attaining the fighter’s altitude ceiling of 18 km and a speed of 1.8 Mach, and undertaking the various complicated manoeuvres that the aircraft is designed for. The trials are likely to involve around 15 sorties.

    Russian launcher

    Though the missile has been indigenously developed, Astra currently depends on a Russian launcher and seeker head. The seeker is yet to be integrated with the missile’s radar, algorithms, etc.

    Officials said Astra has been designed to pull a latax (lateral acceleration) of 40g. (40 times the acceleration due to gravity).

    The second phase of the trials -- avionics integrity tests -- are expected early next year and will involve the integration of the missile’s avionics with that of the aircraft, and a dialoguing between the cockpit and the missile. Officials also disclosed that “some guided flights with a seeker to check for guidance will take place early next year.” The actual firing of Astra from the Su-30MKI is expected in July-August 2010.

    Astra is to be initially fitted on the Su-30MKI and the Mirage 2000, with the Tejas Light Combat Aircraft and the MiG-29 scheduled to be equipped with it later.
     
    HariPrasad-1 likes this.
  2.  
  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/001200703251719.htm

    Astra missile test fired from Chandipur


    Balasore, March. 25 (PTI): India's indigenously developed Astra air-to-air missile was launched from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur near here today.

    The sleek beyond visual range missile was fired from the launch complex-II of ITR, 15 km from here, at 11.56 am, defence sources said.

    The missile has a range of 80 km and its launch speed was estimated to be 0.6 to 2.2 mach, the sources said. Astra has a length of 3570 mm and a diameter of 178 mm.

    A team of scientists of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) from Hyderabad and ITR was busy for the last few days at the range, making preparations for the launch.

    The sources said the anticipated evacuation of people living in villages within a 2.5 km radius of the launch site was not undertaken as the missile was fired from an angle that did not affect the area.

    The Astra may be tested again within the next two days.

    But as it was likely to be launched from a vertical position, there would be a need to evacuate over 6,100 people from nearby villages, the sources said.

    The district administration, at a joint meeting with authorities of ITR, had decided to shift the people, including about 1,800 children from 826 families in six villages located within a 2.5 km radius of the launch complex.

    They will be housed in four temporary shelters where they will be provided food and entertainment. They will also be compensated for being displaced from their homes for a day.

    The Astra was first launched on May 9, 2003 from the ITR and its second and third trials were conducted on May 11 and May 12, 2003 respectively at the same range.

    There is also a possibility of a test of Dhanush, the naval version of the Prithvi missile, from a warship in the Bay of Bengal off the Orissa Coast today, sources said.
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.thehindu.com/2009/05/08/stories/2009050855501300.htm

    Astra missile test-fired



    HYDERABAD: As part of developmental tests, the flight trial of Astra, Beyond Visual Range Air-to-Air Missile (BVRAAM), was successfully carried out by scientists of the Defence Research and Development Organisation recently at Balasore, Orissa.

    DRDO sources told The Hindu here on Thursday that the missile’s dual mode guidance was fully proved when it was fired from the ground at an imaginary target.

    Astra is a high-end tactical missile and is envisaged to intercept enemy aircraft at supersonic speeds in head-on mode at a range of 80 km and in tail-chase mode at 20 km.

    Once the full-fledged flight test is completed, the missile will be integrated with the IAF’s Sukhoi-30, MiG-29 and the Light Combat Aircraft (Tejas).
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/000200809131340.htm

    'Astra' test-fired successfully


    Balasore (Orissa) (PTI): India's indigenously developed, beyond visual range (BVR) air-to-air missile 'Astra' was on Saturday successfully test-fired from the integrated test range (ITR) at Chandipur in Orissa.

    The missile was test-fired from a launcher in the launch pad number 2 of the ITR complex at about 1205 hours. After data analysis of the flight test, another test may be conducted in the next couple of days if needed, defence sources said.

    "Before being made full operational, the complex missile system would undergo some more trials, though test on its navigation, control, air frame, propulsion and other sub-system have been validated," said a source from the Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) at ITR.

    The single stage, solid fuelled 'Astra' missile "is more advanced in its category than the contemporary BVR missiles and it is capable of engaging and destroying highly manoeuvrable supersonic aerial targets," the source added.

    Describing 'Astra' as futuristic missile, DRDO scientists said the weapon could intercept the target at supersonic speeds (mach 1.2 to 1.4).

    Though the exact range of today's trial has not been disclosed, scientists are working to ensure that 'Astra' performs effectively at different altitudes - one cruising at an altitude of 15 km with 90 to 110 km range, another at an altitude up to 30,000 ft, having a range of 44 km and the third at sea level altitude with a range of 30 km.

    The last two experimental flight tests of 'Astra' were conducted from the ITR launch complex at Chandipur on March 25 and 26 last year to study the ballistic performance and control of the missile at a low altitude and shorter range, the sources said.

    The missile is 3.6 meters long, 7 inches in diameter and has launch weight of about 154 kg, thus it is the smallest weapon of the DRDO's guided missile development programme in terms of size and weight. It is capable of carrying 15 kg war head.

    Initially planned to arm Jaguar, MIG-29 and indigenous light combat aircraft, Tejas, DRDO officials are now concentrating that after user's trial, the sleek missile would be integrated with Indian Air Force's front line fighter aircraft like Sukhoi-30 MKIs and Mirage-2000.

    'Aastra' missile project is guided and led by the Hyderabad-based Defence Research and Development Laboratory (DRDL) under the DRDO.

    The prototype of the missile was first tested between May 9 and 12, 2003 from the ITR at Chandipur.
     
  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.hindustantimes.com/rssfe...-successfully-test-fired/Article1-496152.aspx

    Two Astra missiles successfully test fired


    Achieving a new milestone, India today successfully test-fired two indigenously developed air-to-air missiles 'Astra' in quick succession from the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur in Orissa.

    The beyond visual range (BVR) missiles were test-fired from a ground launcher in the launch pad No. 2 of the ITR complex at about 9.45 am and 12.06 pm, defence sources said.

    Describing both the trials as "successful", they said the data of the flight test was being thoroughly analysed.

    Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) scientists said Astra was a futuristic missile and it could intercept targets at supersonic speeds between mach 1.2 to 1.4 (mach one is equivalent to 1236 kmph.)

    "The tests on the missile's navigation, control, air frame, propulsion and other sub-system have been validated," they said.

    The complex missile system would undergo some more trials before being made fully operational, they said.

    The single stage, solid fuel 'Astra' missile "is more advanced in its category than the contemporary BVR missiles and it is capable of engaging and destroying highly manoeuvrable supersonic aerial targets," defence sources said.

    Though the exact range of today's trial was not disclosed, scientists are working to ensure that 'Astra' performs effectively at different altitudes - one, cruising at an altitude of 15 km with 90 to 110 km range, another at an altitude up to 30,000 ft having a range of 44 km and the third, at sea level with a range of 30 km.

    Astra had earlier been test-fired from the ITR at the ground level several times, the sources added.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://knol.google.com/k/vijainder-k-thakur/astra-air-to-air-missile/yo54fmdhy2mq/51#

    Astra air-to-air missile
    Active radar homing, beyond visual range (BVR) missile
    Astra is being developed by Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO).

    The 154kg (340lb) Astra uses active radar homing and is reportedly capable of engaging targets at 80km in the head on mode and 20km while astern.
    Contents
    At a Glance
    Russian Active Seeker
    Development Trials
    Captive Trials

    [​IMG]

    At a Glance Warhead

    Active Radar Seeker Medium range missile
    20kg fragmentation warhead
    Range 80 km head on, 20 km astern
    Physical characteristics Weight: 160kg
    Length: 3.8m
    Diameter: 0.178m


    The missile has a cruise speed of up to Mach 2.2 carrying a 20kg fragmentation warhead. It has a length of 3570 mm and a diameter of 178 mm.

    Planned tests of the 'Astra' missile include launches at

    15 km with 90 to 110 km range
    30,000 ft to 44 km range
    Sea level to 30 km range

    Russian Active Seeker
    The active radar seeker of the missile and its launcher have been sourced from Russia. The seeker is switched on when the missile comes to within 15km of the target.

    DRDO eventually hopes to develop its own active seeker and launcher.

    The missile has a 5m proximity fuse.

    Development Trials

    The missile was first launched on May 9, 2003 from the ITR. Its second and third trials were conducted on May 11 and May 12, 2003 respectively at the same range. These tests were without control and guidance systems.

    A second series of developmental flights to test the guidance system of the missile were carried out on March 25, 26 and 29, 2007.

    A follow up ground launch of the missile was carried out on September 13, 2008.

    A successful developmental test of the missile was announced on Thursday, May 7, 2009. The missile was launched from the ground at an imaginary target to test its dual mode guidance.

    Two 'Astra' tests were conducted at the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur in Orissa on January 11, 2010. The missiles were successfully fired from ground launchers.

    Captive Trials


    Seven captive flight trials of the missile were conducted in November 2009 at Air Force Station Lohegaon, Pune using a Su-30MKI aircraft. The missile was tested for carriage at super sonic speeds and to loads of 7Gs on underwing pylons.

    A total of 15 sorties are planned to establish the aerodynamic stability of the missile aircraft combination within the flight envelop of the aircraft extending to an altitude of 18 km and a speed of 1.8 Mach

    In early 2010, more captive trials will establish the compatibility of the missile's electronics with the Su-30MKI avionics.

    The actual firing of Astra from the Su-30MKI is expected in July-August 2010.

    To begin with, DROD hopes to equip IAF's Su-30MKI and the Mirage 2000 with the Astra missile, since both aircraft have powerful airborne radars to leverage its BVR capability. Later, it hopes to integrate the missile with the Tejas Light Combat Aircraft and the MiG-29s.

    Even though the missile is in the early stages of its development, DRDO has drawn up plans to jointly develop a short-range air defense system with MBDA using a vertically launched variant of Astra.

    Ref:
    Captive flight trials of Astra missile carried out
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.business-standard.com/in...-air-missile-to-make-its-first-flight/373650/

    Astra air-to-air missile to make its first flight


    To add punch to IAF’s fleet of Sukhoi, Mig-29, Mirage-2000, Tejas.Veteran fighter pilots lament the end of the dogfight, the evocative name for a twisty, sky-ripping, adrenaline-packed aerial duel, in which the winner gets behind his opponent and shoots him down with a burst of cannon fire.

    Today, it is less about flying skill, cold nerve and highly-responsive aircraft; the modern-day dogfighting ace is an airborne video-game expert who uses radar to detect his foe at long ranges, and launch a beyond visual range (BVR) missile even before his victim realises that the engagement has begun.

    Just days from now, a Sukhoi-30MKI fighter will take off from an Indian Air Force (IAF) base, an Astra missile fitted on its wing. This will be the first-ever flight of this indigenously developed BVR missile, which the IAF hopes will add punch to its fleet of Sukhoi-30MKI, Mig-29, Mirage-2000 and Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) fighters.

    The Astra, built by the Defence R&D Laboratory (DRDL), Hyderabad, will allow IAF pilots to hit enemy aircraft up to 44 km away, at altitudes up to 20,000 metres. Improving on that will be the Astra Mk II, with a longer range of 80 km.

    The Astra incorporates many cutting-edge technologies. Here is how an Astra would take on an enemy fighter: an IAF fighter’s radar picks up the target; the pilot launches an Astra missile. A high-energy propellant quickly boosts the missile to several times the speed of sound. At ranges beyond 15 km, the Astra cannot “see” its target, so the IAF fighter guides the missile, relaying the target’s continually changing position over a secure radio link. Once it is 15 km from the target, the Astra’s onboard seeker picks up the target; after that the Astra homes in on its own.

    At this point, the target would start turning and diving to throw off the missile. But the Astra manoeuvres better, and moves much faster, than even the most agile fighters. A radio proximity fuse measures the distance to the target. When the target is within 5 metres, the Astra’s radio proximity fuse detonates its warhead, sending a volley of shrapnel ripping through the enemy fighter.

    Most of these technologies have already been proven. The propulsion system, the data link between the aircraft and the Astra, the radio proximity fuse, the onboard computer, the inertial navigation system and other key technologies were developed at the DRDO’s missile complex in Hyderabad.

    The Astra’s seeker is still imported from Russia, but the DRDO hopes to develop one.

    The forthcoming test with a Sukhoi-30MKI is called a “captive flight trial”; it will evaluate whether the Astra can withstand the physical stresses of supersonic flying and high-speed manoeuvring. Early in 2010, a “captive-II flight trial” will check whether the Astra’s avionics are properly matched with those of the Sukhoi-30MKI. The fighter should receive the missile’s signals; and the Astra should receive the aircraft’s commands.

    “Matching an Indian missile with a Russian fighter’s avionics has turned out to be a complex task”, explains Mukesh Chand, one of the Astra’s key developers, “But the Astra will be much better integrated with the Indian Tejas LCA.”

    Only in October 2010, after all the Astra’s systems are certified airworthy, will a live Astra be fired from a fighter. But the project scientists are confident; in a September 2008 test in Balasore, Orissa, a ground-launched Astra shot down an electronic target, validating many of the most complex technologies.

    A drawback in the Astra remains its high weight; even a heavy fighter like the Sukhoi-30MKI cannot carry the missile on its wingtip stations. In comparison with the Astra’s estimated 150 kg, other BVR missiles like the Israeli Derby weigh around 100 kg only.

    Nevertheless, the IAF believes the Astra will usefully supplement India’s inventory of BVR missiles. The Russian R-77 Adder, which arms India’s Russian aircraft fleet, faces worrying questions about its reliability. And the R530D missile, carried by the Mirage-2000, is nearing obsolescence.
     
  9. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    4,149
    Likes Received:
    1,060
    I dont understand R-77 weighs 175kg, AIM-120 AMRAAM weighs 152kg. why weight of Astra is really an issue?
     
  10. gogbot

    gogbot Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    937
    Likes Received:
    116
    ASTRA also has a lower range than those missiles in comparison.

    Also since this is an in house option, IAF reserves the right to request the missile as it wants it.
     
  11. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    4,149
    Likes Received:
    1,060
    ranges of R-77 and AIM-120 are 90 and 120 km. ASTRA also have similar range, so why IAF need the same kind of missile in 100kg?
     
  12. gb009

    gb009 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    4
    from the post by LF
    ofcourse the previous post has this:
    but these are planned tests only.

    I think DRDO has not come out with an official figure for its range and most of the numbers floating around are only predictions. If there is a link to some official figures then we could decide if it actually is overweight or not. When the news of development of Astra came out years back I remember the range was being reported as round 50/40km or so. Does not mean they (DRDO) could not have increased it over time.

    Now one more thing, another quote from LF's post
    Given most fighters today have a top speed over 1.4 mach, isn't this a drawback/disadvantage for the Astra? :(....
     
  13. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    This speed issue has always been a mystery many say MACH 2.2 and other 1.2-1.4, some people I have spoken to say the missile adjusts it speed as it approaches the target to have greater success. Most airplanes no matter how good or what generation they are can fly MACH 2 and above for long periods without burning thru the fuel and causing stress on the planes that can lead to cracking.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
  14. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    Astra-aim-120 comparision

    [​IMG]
     
  15. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.flightglobal.com/article...drdo-advances-astra-missile-test-firings.html

    India's DRDO advances Astra missile test firings


    India's Defence Research and Development Organisation has conducted the first five test firings of the indigenously developed Astra beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile. The 154kg (340lb) weapon has a claimed range of 110km (59nm) and a cruise speed of up to Mach 2.2 carrying a 20kg fragmentation warhead.

    The Astra missile is expected to be integrated with Indian air force types including the Aeronautical Development Agency Tejas light combat aircraft and Sukhoi Su-30MKI, and potentially also included in upgrades to the service's legacy Dassault Mirage 2000s and RSK MiG-29s.
     
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    Astra bvraam -a star is born

    [​IMG]
     
  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    Astra bvraam -a star is born -cont

    [​IMG]
     
  18. blade

    blade Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    KOLKATA
    Though as per the brochure the range of astra is around 110km it will take atleast 5 more years before this BVR missile is optimized to that level. What i failed to understand is the fact how can this missile be termed as the lightest in its class ( mentioned in the article provided by you). So can anyone put some light on this issue please?
     
  19. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    Astra 2 will be the next generation that will come out in the next 5 years. Astra is the lightest in it's class compared to American,French and Russian missiles but benefit it gains from being light it loses slightly in range. The weight may intentionally be kept at this level for a good reason the missile is flexible enough where it can be used on every plane in our inventory LCA,Sukhois,Mig-29 and Mirages.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
    AkhandBharat likes this.
  20. mehrotraprince

    mehrotraprince Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    209
    Location:
    India
    I think reliability should be the priority along with range. At maximum range the probability of hitting the target reduces drastically since enemy aircrafts gets more reaction time.
     
  21. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,551
    Likes Received:
    6,556
    http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread116384/pg1

    India's ASTRA BVRAAM


    The Astra missile programme is headed by the Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO). The goal of this programme is to provide the Indian Air Force (IAF) with an indigenously-designed beyond visual range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM) to equip the IAF's Mirage 2000, MiG-29, Su-30MKI and the future Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). A model of the Astra was first shown to the public at Aero India '98. On 25 July 2001 in Indian Parliament, then-incumbent Defence Minister Jaswant Singh said that a feasibility study for the Astra has commenced, after the completion of which a project for development of the Astra is planned to be undertaken. Development of this missile is likely to take about seven to eight years. Unconfirmed reports state that the first ground-launched ballistic tests of the Astra airframe are planned for 2003. The Mirage 2000H has been designated as the first potential platform for the Astra when the weapon enters service at the end of this decade.

    The Astra missile uses a terminal active radar-seeker to find targets and a mid-course internal guidance system with updates, to track targets. The on-board ECCM capability allows it to jam radar signals from an enemy surface-to-air battery, ensuring that the missile is not tracked or shot down. This indigenous missile is intended to have performance characteristics similar to the R-77RVV-AE (AA-12), which currently forms part of the IAF's missile armoury. The missile is 3.8 metres long and is said to be configured like a longer version of the Super 530D, narrower in front of the wings. Astra uses a HTPB solid-fuel propellant and a 15 kg HE (high-explosive) warhead, activated by a proximity fuse. The missile has a maximum speed of Mach 4+ and a maximum altitude of 20 km. The missile can reportedly undertake 40 g turns close to sea level, when attacking a manoeuvring target. Although designed to use a locally-developed solid fuel propellant, DRDO is also looking at rocket/ramjet propulsion to provide greater range and enhanced kinematic performance.

    Robert Hewson, editor of Jane's Air Launched Weapons, in a March 2003 issue of Jane's Defence Weekly stated, "The basic Astra design uses a metallic airframe with a long low aspect-ratio wing and a single-stage smokeless rocket motor. After launch, the missile will use a combination of inertial mid-course guidance and/or data-linked targeting updates before it enters its terminal acquisition phase. In a head-on engagement, the Astra will have a maximum range of 80 km. The missile's onboard radio-frequency seeker has been largely designed in India but incorporates a degree of outside assistance, according to DRDO sources. It will have an autonomous homing range of 15 km. The missile's warhead is a pre-fragmented directional unit, fitted with a proximity fuze. A radar fuze already exists for the Astra, but the DRDO is currently working on a new laser fuze. According to the DRDO, the first ground-launched aerodynamic trials of the Astra will begin within the first half of this year. This will be followed by the next phase of controlled in-flight test launches."

    Specifications

    Length: 3570 mm
    Body Diameter: 178 mm
    Wing Span: N/A
    Launch Weight: 154 kg.
    Warhead: 15 kg pre-fragmented directional.
    Fuze: Radar Proximity (laser proximity to follow).
    Guidance: Inertial midcourse with data-linked updates, active-radar terminal homing.
    Propulsion: Solid rocket motor.
    Range: 80 km head on, 15 km tail chase.
     

Share This Page