Airport body scanners

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by Rebelkid, Jan 18, 2010.

?

India should implement full body scanners

  1. Yes

    6 vote(s)
    60.0%
  2. No

    4 vote(s)
    40.0%
  1. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    this is a contraversial topic...dont ban me mods..but i thought it was necessary for me to say it

    The picture u see is one of the pics from the airport body scanners which is being implimented

    BUt i want u guyz to do something

    1. Open image in paint
    2. Go to Images scroll bar and click on invert colours

    now check that image clarity ... Hell i would not want my wife/GF/Daughter going through that stuff and revealing everything in front of the authorities ..

    Thats just my openion .....i kinda feel uncomfortable :( :( :( :(
     
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  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    better travel by car or train or by bus............

    Blame OBL for all this..........

    BTW great find......
     
  4. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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  5. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

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    Saving human lives from the threat of suicide bombers is worth violating other human rights to some extent. Airport scanners are no different in this respect to check points and security barriers. It's not a matter of choice anymore. A necessity.
     
  6. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    huh!! ...how wonderfull... Al Quiada scared the pants of everybody ...i mean literally, Paranoia to the highest levels !!!

    'Those who would sacrifice freedom for security deserve neither' - Benjamin Franklin
     
  7. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

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    I understand your arguments Rebelkid, and may be we are too quick in our decisions to welcome these scanners. I do however think just one life saved is worth the effort and losing some personal privacy.
     
  8. StealthSniper

    StealthSniper Senior Member Senior Member

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    I don't agree, yes using high technology to keep everyone safe is a good thing but what if someone sticks something up their butt and blow up a plane, are you ready to do full cavity searches. Because if it gets to that we will have no privacy left. Their has to be a line drawn somewhere, unless you like to have full body searches before you travel.


    And another thing that I realized is that they will be checking little kids also and I think that's just wrong.



    "Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both." Benjamin Franklin.
     
  9. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    I don't know why so much of fuss about it Body scanners should be used if they can help in making travel more secure (which I think they will) for women there can be a separate scanner manned by women no need to create so much fuss about it. And regarding checking kids, I don't see any wrong with that as they are also going to sit in plane what if some one uses them to put a bomb.
     
  10. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

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    I think you're getting a bit theoretical with Reality. The point is that the technology exists now, during a time of heightened threat. Inconveniences are therefore unavoidable, and those who choose to travel are going to have to deal with them. The necessity to use an existing technology to save lives disproportionately outweighs the concepts of inconvenience and cultural unseemliness.
     
  11. StealthSniper

    StealthSniper Senior Member Senior Member

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    Nitesh you have to realize that if someone wants to blow up a plane they will find a way, body scanner or not. A trained explosives dog will do a much better job at finding explosives material on a person then a body scanner will because a body scanner can't see inside your nose, mouth, etc.


    I think if they want to use a body scanner that's fine but I guarantee if that's the only thing they use to certify your okay to fly, then I'm worried. If they use the body scanner in conjunction with the hand scanner and explosives dog then I'm satisfied that we are safe. But then of course we are never 100% safe and we could get hit by a bus the next day or something.
     
  12. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    yes nothing is 100% but what's wrong in using technology for providing security. I really don't see the need of opposing it
     
  13. plugwater

    plugwater Elite Member Elite Member

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    I'm not so sure about that. If we continue to remove methods they can use then they will be forced to resort to more difficult (and therefore more expensive/infeasible/etc. methods) to try and bomb planes.

    On the other hand, if we don't do anything then terrorist technology will continue to develop anyway - we'll soon have conventional bombs, liquid bombs and blood bombs (and other fancy-fangled measures).
    Put it this way - you can lock your front door or you can choose not to. Locking your front door carries the annoyance that you have to unlock it when you go out. Also, a lock on your front door isn't going to stop some thief from driving a car through your front door to get in. So locking your door doesn't prevent new, more technologically advanced methods - so why bother locking your door?

    Locking front door = Full body scanner
    Need to unlock = Invasion of privacy
    Car through front door = Fancy bombing method
     
  14. StealthSniper

    StealthSniper Senior Member Senior Member

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    Well you might be right on maybe "slowing down" their attempt to do harm to someone from the air but then they can also go to more desperate measures and blow themselves before they even get on a plane or even when they are in the airport itself. People only focus on the airport but don't realize that we can be anywhere and be in harms way.

    I think that it's a good idea to use technology to try to inhibit terrorist from trying to do the public bodily harm but I just don't think the body scanner is a good enough technology to do it.

    Frankly the scare on the Detroit plane involving the Nigerian man could have been stopped much earlier if they followed procedures and checked him because he was a "suspect which was listed and known to US officials". If he was listed he shouldn't be on a plane and if he was going to go on a plane I'm sure they would have been more thorough with their screening of the man. I don't really see the security procedures failing but only operational procedures not being followed.


    I still think that the body scanner is a rushed technology to make passengers feel safer so that they won't lose a lot of customers, and I think that a bomb sniffing dog (if required), background check, x-ray and hand scanner are still very effective.
     
  15. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    there should be a line drawn between security and privacy.... There are far more better ways to prevent security in an airport... than taking colour photos of naked people ..

    Wont this piece of equipment be violating some privacy regulation acts in india and abroad ??

    I,d love to hear opinions from our female members in this forum .... BTW... MY GF says she would rather swim half way across the ocean than go through that thing in front of the authorities.
     
  16. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    This is like an X-ray taken of you.

    Imagine if you are a frequent business traveller.
    Would you want your body exposed to so much X-ray each time you fly.
     
  17. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    The radiation is harmfull for children,infants and especally harmfull for pregnent women... It has also been known to cause cancer.
     
  18. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Airport Security: German solution to detecting commercial and military explosives

    [​IMG]03 Feb 2009 Luca Bonsignore: With the failed attempt to blow up a Northwest Airlines' flight on Christmas day and the false alarm that partially shut down the Twin Cities airport on Tuesday last week, airport security once again returned as a hot topic. As usual, after such frightening events, there is an international outcry for tighter security measures at airports. In the same breath, as security agencies around the globe are searching for the most advanced technology to increase the safety of passengers, civil-rights activists fear that the tighter security will lead to a further loss of individual freedoms.
    However, the question of whether we are willing to trade privacy for greater airport security is misdirected. The right question is “Which systems can master the security lapses that have occurred with a minimum of disturbance to innocent passengers?” This is not only because some passengers might be disturbed by the level of anatomical details that can be seen through full body scanners, but also because additional security measures, such as the scans, will automatically delay the entire checking procedure, causing economic damages. And one major aspect has often been forgotten: The best intelligence is often the covert one, where criminals and terrorists are not aware of security measures around them.

    The full-body scanner
    In today’s frantic search for better security, some new and some old ideas are being given serious consideration, such as mind readers and lie detectors. Many of these raise questions about civil liberties and all are costly. The most discussed security technique, however, is the full-body scanner, which will soon be installed in airports across Canada and which are also under consideration in many European countries as well as at all airports in the United States.
    Following the incident on the Northwest Airlines’ flight coming from Amsterdam, the Netherlands announced that it would use more full-body scanners for flights heading to the United States. Dutch Foreign Minister Guusje Ter Horst said during a press conference in late December that the Netherlands previously did not want these scanners to be used because of privacy concerns. However, as a result of the incident, both countries’ authorities have agreed that “all possible measures will be used on flights to the US.”
    Although some experts say that a full-body scanner might have stopped Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab from boarding the aircraft, many doubt that it would have detected the devices in this particular case. Indeed, another checkpoint would increase the security at a specific level, but it will need to be proven if this will do the trick.

    The Israeli model
    When it comes to security, everybody looks to the Israelis who are said to have the greatest experience and success in fighting terror. The Israeli airports are widely considered the most secure in the world, applying the so-called “onion” principle of security, which increase passengers’ safety through a multiple-layer security procedure, including not only the screening of baggage with X-ray machines and metal detectors but also the screening of people. At Ben-Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv, travellers pass through different security checks before even entering the building. Most of these checks are done covertly, which allows separating suspect peoples from the rest before they even understand that they have been identified. This is a principle which should be considered by all airports wanting to implement sustainable steps to improve their security.

    Human contact
    In Israeli airports, security personnel move around with the focus on screening people, not baggage. Most of the passengers do not even realise that they are going through a series of screens. The effectiveness of the screening is based on human contact. If a passenger is identified as suspicious, usually the next step involves security personnel interviewing him, looking him in the eyes and seeing how he reacts to questions. When there is reasonable ground for suspicion, the person will be checked intensively. Thanks to this system, Ben-Gurion airport has been free from terrorist attacks since the 1970s.
    Due to a variety of political and social considerations, the type of procedures applied at Israeli airports through human intelligence would most probably not be acceptable at European or US airports, being unavoidably regarded as synonymous to so-called “profiling”. The question is whether technological solutions could be identified that would guarantee the same level of overall security without raising burdensome political issues.
    As the Israeli “onion” principle shows, intersecting technologies are needed in order to keep terrorists from boarding airplanes with hazardous devices or materials. Of course, full-body scanners give a more detailed view of what people are carrying under their clothes than current systems. However, it is debatable whether even such a scanner would have detected the explosive material hidden in the underwear of Abdulmutallab who tried to bomb Northwest Flight 253.
    In any case, it is wise to expand the use of expensive full-body scanners, but only as part of a broader strategy to make flying safer. Additional systems should be included in the entire safety architecture.

    The HEDD1 detection system
    German company Unival Group GmbH has launched a detection device which would allow receiving real-time intelligence information in a covert mode. The HEDD1 (Handheld Explosive Detection Device) works instantly, without the need of a fixed installation and can be used by any operator after a short training. The mobile system, which just entered the market in October 2009, works on a patented Magneto-Electrostatic Detection (MED) method. Creating its own magnetic field, the HEDD1 is able to detect all kinds of commercial and military explosives, including TNT, dynamite, gun powder and liquid explosives. As soon as an explosive is detected, the handheld system moves the integrated antenna in the direction of the source.
    Allowing long range detection up to 100 meters, the operator would receive important information without a direct contact with the travellers. “HEDD1 would find explosive material behind any barrier such as steel or other substances, outdoing a body scanner,” David Vollmar, managing Director of unival group told defpro.com . HEDD1 would even detect so-called body-borne improvised explosive device (BBIEDs), explosives that suicide bombers might ingest or insert into their body cavities.

    The German group claims that the integration of HEDD1 into current airport security structures would increase the security level immediately without creating any additional disturbance or delay to travellers. By using the detector from a wider distance or behind barriers, covert detection would be possible, providing the identification of a terrorist without unmasking the system being used to do so.
    Future
    The system is currently being tested for base protection in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as for access, building and protection of personnel. It can also be applied for de-mining activities and for detection of weapons and ammunitions in military and police operations. A new working prototype of the handheld system has just been presented to defpro.com which can detect radioactive materials. Hazard Detection Group, a company within unival group, is also developing and currently testing first prototypes with the focus on the detection of CBRN materials. Future developments will also consider stand-alone solutions allowing the implementation of the system on, for instance, unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs).
    (Reproduced in full with permission from defpro.com)


    http://www.8ak.in/8ak_india_defence...cting-commercial-and-military-explosives.html
     
  19. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Trials of full-body scanners at Delhi airport from May


    2010-02-03 14:30:00

    India will start using full-body scanners to screen passengers at the international airport here on a trial basis from May and decide by the end of the Commonwealth Games in October who will get the multi-million dollar contract to supply such equipment.
    Currently security checks at airports include pat-down searches, door frame metal detectors and hand-held device scans. But these can mainly detect metals and not non-metallic objects that can be kept hidden in one's underwear like the one carried by Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, a Nigerian passenger, on a North-Western airline from Amsterdam to Detroit on Christmas.

    The plastic explosives Abdulmutallab concealed in his underwear failed to detonate properly, resulting only in flames and popping sounds.

    As part of the process to strengthen security, all ground staff and airline officials will be issued biometric identification cards from March with dedicated points to gain entry into Delhi airport, said a top official in the civil aviation ministry.

    'This is a secure and efficient means of identification,' the official said, explaining that the biometric card will have an embedded micro-chip incorporating some tamper-proof features of an individual that will be virtually impossible to forge.

    'It will have an individual's unique physical traits such as fingerprint, the pattern of the iris, facial features. Given the era we live in, biometric procedures in the aviation sector is essential,' the official told IANS, requesting complete anonymity.

    Around 30,000 people work at airports daily, including the security personnel, and the process of biometric cards will cost no more than Rs.10 million.

    Speaking about body scanners, which has left people worried over intrusion into their privacy because of its potential to scan through clothes, the official said there was no cause for worry and the government has already decided to introduce the scanners.

    'We need around 125-200 full-body scanners for Delhi and Mumbai. These are our busiest. The trials will run through the end of the Commonwealth Games. These scanners cost between Rs.8 million and Rs.10 million apiece ($160,000-$200,000),' the official said.

    He said trial runs will not only give the Bureau of Civil Aviation Security, the nodal agency to frame security standards at airports, a constructive insight into functioning of equipment but also which company is suited best to be given the order.

    'Only a handful of countries like the US, Britain, France and Israel manufacture these scanners. Most of the scanners on trial here will be from US companies. The trials will also help us assess performance during power fluctuations or outages.'

    The official also sought to allay apprehensions that the full-body scanners that will be deployed at airports will compromise an individual's right to privacy and modesty, as they have the provision to convert the images into graphics.

    'At Amsterdam's Schipol Airport, the scanners are retrofitted with a software that only projects a stylized human figure on to the computer rather than the actual body image,' he said, adding 15 such scanners were in use with plans for 60 more.





    http://sify.com/news/Trials-of-full...rport-from-May-news-National-kcdo4bjghfc.html
     

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