World Wide Aircraft Carrier Analysis

A.V.

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GARIBALDI CLASS











Designation: CVL
Length: 590 ft
Width: 108 ft
Beam: 98 ft
Displacement: 13,000 tons
Propulsion: 4 LM2500 gas turbines (COGAG),
2 shafts
Speed: 30 knots
Crew: 780
Airwing: 18 VSTOL, rotary
- 2 X 8 Aspide SAM
- 2 X 4 Otomat SSM
- 6 X 40mm guns
- 3 X 2 324mm torpedoes
Elevators: 2
Ships in class: 1
MM Garibaldi C551
The MM Garibaldi (C551) was commissioned in 1985 and started its life as the world smallest aircraft carrier. That distinction has since passed to the Thai carrier, the Naruebet. The Garibaldi was built particularly for antisubmarine warfare (ASW) operations, carrying mainly helicopters for that task and a light load of VSTOL Harrier aircraft for fleet defense.
Since its commission, however, the Garibaldi has proven the equal of a number of tasks in addition to ASW work, including command and control of naval and naval air forces, area surveillance, convoy escort, support of commando and amphibious operations, fleet logistic support, and humanitarian aid.

With its strong command and control facilities, which have been upgraded significantly over the years, the Garibaldi has taken its position as the flagship of the Italian Navy, where it will remain until after the commissioning and sea trials of the next generation Italian aircraft carrier, MM Cavour C552 in 2008.

The the forward portion of the Garibaldi's flight deck rises to a ski ramp of about 4°. The ship can accommodate up to 18 helicopters, like the Agusta Sikorsky SH-3D Sea King or the Agusta Bell AB212. Alternatively the ship can accommodate 16 AV-8B Harrier II aircraft, or a mix of helicopter and Harriers. The vessel's flight deck has been upgraded to allow operations with the EH101 helicopter, in service with the Italian Navy
 

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CHAKRI NARUEBET

















Designation: CVH
Length: 600 ft
Width: 90 ft
Beam: 74 ft
Displacement: 12,000 tons
Propulsion: 4 GE LM-2500 gas turbines (CODOG),
2 shafts
Speed: 26 knots
Crew: 600
Airwing: 18 VSTOL, rotary
- 4 X 20mm CIWS
- 2 X 30mm guns
Elevators: 2
Ships in class: 1
911 Chakri Naruebet
The HTMS Chakri Naruebet, officially designated an Offshore Patrol Helicopter Carrier, was constructed for the Royal Thai Navy (RTN) by Spanish shipbuilders Izar. Constructed in Spain, when commissioned in 1997 in Thailand, she became the smallest aircraft carrier in the world, taking over that distinction from the Italian carrier, MM Garibaldi C551.
Designed similar to the Spanish carrier Principe de Asturias, it is fitted with a 12° ski jump to enable the use of Harrier VSTOL aircraft.

The carrier is tasked with warfare/flagship command and control, air support for amphibious operations and the Thai surface fleet, EEZ surveillance and protection, search and rescue, and disaster relief. It is based in the Gulf of Thailand.

The ship is equipped with six multi-mission Sikorsky S-70B Seahawk helicopters, designed for use in an anti-submarine role. These are supplemented with six ex-Spanish Matador AV-8S (Harrier) VSTOL aircraft. The Chakri Naruebet's can accommodate five simultaneous helicopter take-off/landings; the hangar provides space for ten medium helicopters or Harrier-sized aircraft. The carrier's maximum speed is 26 knots, with a cruise speed of 16 knots. Range is estimated to be 10,000nm at 12 knots. Two spade rudders and four hull stabilisers have been fitted.
 

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VIKRANT




Designation: CV
Length: 830 ft
Width: 190 ft
Beam: 116 ft
Displacement: 40,000 tons
Propulsion: 4 LM 2500 gas turbines,
2 shafts
Speed: 28 knots
Crew: 1,600
Airwing: 30 Fixed, rotary
Armament:
- 2 X 16 VLS SAM
- 4 X 76mm guns
Elevators: 2
Ships in class: 1
INS Vikrant (Building)
In April 2005 India began building its first indigenously designed aircraft carrier, the INS Virkant, in the Cochin naval shipyards. The vessel is being built to the final Air Defense Ship (ADS) design set forth by the India Navy's Directorate of Naval Design (DND) for the last several years. The keel laying is scheduled late in the year. The ship is expected to enter service in 2012 when it will join the INS Vikramaditya, which will have replaced the INS Viraat in 2010.
This 830 foot-long ship, with a 40,000 ton full-load displacement,, will be capable of operating up to 30 modern fighter aircraft, including MiG-29K, LCA (Navy), See Harrier, and up to to 10 helicopters of different types Its 2.5 acre flight deck, with a maximum width of 190 ft, will enable launch of fighter aircraft using ski-jump for take off and arrester wire for landing on an angled deck. Powered by four LM 2500 gas turbines, generating 80 MW of power, the ship will be able to achieve speeds in excess of 28 knots. The crew will consist of a complement of 1,600 officers and men.

A second carrier of this class is expected to be built and delivered in 2018 to join the new Virkant and the Vikramaditya. At that time, the Indian Navy will have three large, modern carriers.

The initial construction day, April 11, 2005, will always be remembered in the Indian Navy's quest for indigenous aircraft carrier construction and significant milestone in the maritime history of modern India. On that day, the construction of India's largest warship project, the first indigenous aircraft carrier designed by DND, commenced at the Cochin Shipyard with the steel-cutting by Mr TR Baalu, Union Minister for Shipping, Road Transport and Highways in the presence of the Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Arun Prakash and Chief Minister of Kerala, Mr Oomen Chandy. .
 

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VIRAAT












Designation: CVL
Length: 745 ft
Width: 160 ft
Beam: 90 ft
Displacement: 28,700 tons
Propulsion: 4 boilers, 2 shafts
Speed: 28 knots
Crew: 2,100
Airwing: 35 VSTOL, rotary
Armament:
- 2 X 4 SAM
- 8 X 30mm guns
Elevators: 2
Ships in class: 1
INS Viraat
The Viraat is the former United Kingdom aircraft carrier, Hermes, that participated so ably during the Falkland war campaign, that was sold to India in 1986 and recommissioned as an INS carrier. It has gone through extensive refits and maintenance, but continues to operate and perform well for Indian naval operations.
The current air group of the Viraat consists of 12 to 18 Sea Harrier V/STOL fighters and seven or a eight Sea King or Kamov 'Hormone' ASW helicopters. In emergencies, the Viraat can operate up to 30 Harriers. At present, the Sea Harrier aircraft, are armed with Sea Eagle Anti-Ship Missiles (ASMs) and Matra 550 Magic missiles. The helicopters, like the Sea King, are used Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), Search-And-Rescue (SAR) and transport. The carrier is fitted by the "Barak" missile point defense system made by Israel.

A recent refit (1999-2001) extended the service life of the carrier to 2010, when she is expected to be replaced by the new INS Vikramaditya carrier that is currently being converted from the former Russian carrier Gorshkov design.
 

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VIKRAMDITYA












Designation: CV
Length: 900 ft
Width: 174 ft
Beam: 107 ft
Displacement: 45,000 tons
Propulsion: 8 turbo pressurized boilers,
4 shafts
Speed: 32 knots
Crew: 1,600
Airwing: 30 fixed, rotary
Armament:
Uknown
Elevators: 2
Ships in class: 1
Vikramaditya (Building)
Former Russian Kiev Class carrier, Gorshkov. Sold to India with an entire wing of Mig-29 fighters that will operate off its decks, along with many other Russian contracts to help build and support the vessel.
Operations and defensive systems will be a mix of western, Russian, and indeginous Indian systems, like a number of other Indian naval vessels.

The Vakramaditya is slated to replace the aging INS Viraat aircraft carrier in 2010, after it is completed, commissioned and finished with trials. In 2012, the Vikramaditya will be joined by the INS Virkant, currently under construction and due to be the first indigenously designed and built Indian aircraft carrier.

To date (April 2009) cost overruns continue to plague the refit and the Russians are still looking for the Indians to come up with more money. Despite the differences, work continues and the vessel was recently floated and moved for further outfitting. It is still undetermined if the Indians will complete the project if the costs run too high...in which case the Russians may finish it for themselves.
 

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