USA military developments

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cobra commando

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Honeywell Boosts Data Transmission Rates for Army Helicopters

Honeywell is working with the Army to have helicopters transmit more data faster through a helicopter's rotor wash allowing pilots to send videos faster and better communicate with headquarters. Army leaders keep asking more from their helicopter pilots to include having some control nearby drones. Ground commanders are also turning most helicopters into intelligence collection aircraft by mounting a wide array of sensors on board. The rotor wash above the helicopter makes it tougher to transmit data to satellites. Honeywell has since worked with the Army to develop a host of systems to improve the data transmit rate, which the company displayed at the 2014 Association of the U.S. Army's annual conference this week. Army leaders want to bring ground commanders closer to combat and will depend on increases data rates from helicopters to set up these airborne headquarters units. Engineers also had to keep in mind those extra sensors mean the helicopters get heavier and the their data transmission suites must get lighter, said Tim Roberts, an officials with Honeywell Aerospace. Honeywell has been installing Aspire 200 satellite communication systems on board undisclosed Army helicopters to speed up their data transfer rate. The Aspire 200 replaced Honeywell eNfusion HSD-400 high speed data transceivers. The Aspire weights 15 pounds lighter than the eNfusion. In September, Honeywell also unveiled its newest intermediate gain phased-array antenna, the Aspire AMT-1800 IGA the Army is mounting to its Army helicopter fleet.
Honeywell Boosts Data Transmission Rates for Army Helicopters
 

W.G.Ewald

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From 2004 to 2011, American and American-trained Iraqi troops repeatedly encountered, and on at least six occasions were wounded by, chemical weapons remaining from years earlier in Saddam Hussein's rule.

In all, American troops secretly reported finding roughly 5,000 chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs, according to interviews with dozens of participants, Iraqi and American officials, and heavily redacted intelligence documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...casualties-of-iraq-chemical-weapons.html?_r=1

The story bears on the old "Did Saddam have WMD?" question, but even more on the medical treatment, or lack of it, afforded to US soldiers who were exposed.
 

Illusive

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US military tests 'self-steering' bullets that can follow moving targets

The United States Department of Defense has carried out what it says is its most successful test yet of a bullet that can go round corners

Self-steering bullets that can steer themselves towards a moving target have been tested by the US Department of Defense.
The bullet was developed by America's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to "increase hit rates for difficult, long-distance shots".
It has now been revealed a series of tests in February were successful, with even novices that were using the system for the first time able to hit moving targets.

The project, which is known as Exacto, is thought to use small fins that shoot out of the bullet and re-direct its path, but the US has not disclosed how it works.
It only says that the programme has "developed new approaches and advanced capabilities to improve the range and accuracy of sniper systems beyond the current state of the art".
The bullet features a real-time optical guidance system to direct it to its target by compensating for "weather, wind, target movement and other factors" that could prevent successful hits.
That should allow snipers to become much more accurate.

"True to DARPA's mission, EXACTO has demonstrated what was once thought impossible: the continuous guidance of a small-caliber bullet to target," said Jerome Dunn, DARPA program manager.
"This live-fire demonstration from a standard rifle showed that EXACTO is able to hit moving and evading targets with extreme accuracy at sniper ranges unachievable with traditional rounds.
"Fitting EXACTO's guidance capabilities into a small .50-caliber size is a major breakthrough and opens the door to what could be possible in future guided projectiles across all calibers."
 
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sob

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necropost. Closing down.

If something new has to be added please open a new thread.
 
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