US tries to tamp down tension

amoy

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Updated: 2010-02-03 06:45 Comments(68) PrintMail Large Medium Small
Beijing makes it clear that it will have an appropriate response



Still smarting at Washington's $6.4 billion arms sale to Taipei four days after the announcement, Beijing reaffirmed yesterday that there will be measured retaliation even as senior US officials tried to douse the flames.

"The US insisted on selling arms to Taiwan regardless of Beijing's resolute opposition that will, inevitably, severely damage China's cooperation with the US on relevant key international and regional issues," said Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu.

"China will sanction companies involved in the arms sales," Ma said at a press briefing when asked whether the threat of sanctions was just empty talk. "We'll urge US companies involved to stop pushing for, and participating, in arms sales to Taiwan."

Ma did not specify the issues on which cooperation could be affected or which companies involved in the deal face sanctions. Boeing, United Technologies, Lockheed Martin and Raytheon are the companies which are selling arms or equipment to Taiwan.

Related readings:
Sanctions 'could hurt aviation industry'
Boeing China: No sanctions yet for arms sales role
Beijing furious at arms sale
US arms sale to Taiwan not to harm relations: analysts
Defense Ministry slams US arms sale


However, he implied that the postponement of a bilateral human rights dialogue, originally scheduled for the end of the month, is a fallout of the arms sale.

Some US officials, apparently taken aback at China's strong response, are trying to downplay the row.

US Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he hoped Beijing's decision to curtail bilateral military contacts would be temporary, and that he still planned to visit China later this year.

"Stability is enhanced by contact between our militaries and a greater understanding of each other's strategies, so I hope that if there is a downturn, that it will be a temporary one and that we can get back to strengthening this relationship," Gates said.

US Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman said in Beijing yesterday that he joined Gates in hoping that it is a short downturn.

"I hope disagreement here and the postponement of military-military exchanges is only temporary, because the best we can do is to continue building trust and confidence," said the ambassador.

Stressing the two countries have their own and different core interests, Huntsman told China Daily that "the only way to make progress in this relationship is by a full debate of what the core interests are, why we have core interests, and how realistically we can proceed in respecting these core interests".

"We will move forward with all confidence and trust we need to get the important work of the region done," said Huntsman.

In its toughest response in three decades to US arms sales to Taiwan after the Obama administration notified Congress on Friday of its proposed deal, Beijing announced over the weekend that it would curtail military and security exchanges with Washington and warned of severe harm to bilateral ties and cooperation on international and regional issues.

It also threatened sanctions against US companies involved, a rare action by a developing country against a developed economy.

The US describes arms sales to Taiwan as a "long-standing commitment to provide for Taiwan's defensive needs".

But Gong Li, deputy director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies at the Central Party School, said Washington was missing a key point.

"The US claims that it must fulfill its promise of protecting Taiwan; however, it should also remember its declaration in the joint communique (signed in 1982) that it would reduce arms sales until they are totally stopped.

"With good prospects for cross-Straits relations, there is no need to sell Taiwan those weapons at all. Under the circumstances, the US action is improper."

Gong said he did not expect the US to alter its arms sales list but was sure Washington "will receive a clear signal from Beijing this time that it has to pay for what it did".

"It is a reminder to them that the old rules do not apply in today's game any more."

Li Cheng, director of research at the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings Institution, was quoted by the Voice of America as saying that the threat of sanctions will have some impact on US companies involved.

Li said that the impact is not significant enough to make those companies drop the deals. But they will know that, by doing so, they have to pay a price, he added.
 
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If the arm sales are the cause of the tensions and US has no intentions of stopping the sale how does it ease the tension? just useless rhetoric.
 

Yusuf

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Who is trying to cool down the tension, china or the US? China should go right ahead and sanction boeing, LM etc... If it has the guts that is.
 

Agantrope

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Who is trying to cool down the tension, china or the US? China should go right ahead and sanction boeing, LM etc... If it has the guts that is.
Lol!!! Yusuf. They are making the whole of Boeing it seems, dare then to saction on these Organization. China's ballon now begin to deflate. Lets wait and see more pictures :)

This is all part of geopolitics. China has to bear this as it justified the sale of arms to pakistan. Always a coin has 2 sides :D
 
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There is a big difference in reversed engineered untested Chinese weapons that nobody is rushing to buy that Pakistan is getting and the weapons USA will Taiwan.
 

thakur_ritesh

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Well if something has caught my eyes in this article is this, damn world is changing indeed, just follow the sequence, shows you what future has in store :

PRC’s reaction:
It also threatened sanctions against US companies involved, a rare action by a developing country against a developed economy.

US’s reaction:
US Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he hoped Beijing's decision to curtail bilateral military contacts would be temporary, and that he still planned to visit China later this year.

US Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman said in Beijing yesterday that he joined Gates in hoping that it is a short downturn.
 
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Gates will visit China later in the year fill the Chinese up with G2 dreams and beating USA to become the world economic leader and then sell some more arms to Taiwan afterwards.
 

amoy

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China to levy anti-dumping duties on U.S. chicken

English.news.cn 2010-02-05 21:31:31 FeedbackPrintRSS

BEIJING, Feb. 5 (Xinhua) -- China's Ministry of Commerce (MOC) said Friday that it would impose initial anti-dumping measures on chicken imports from the United States.

The preliminary ruling required importers of chicken products from the United States to place deposits at Chinese customs starting from Feb. 13, according to a statement on the MOC website.

The statement said investigations showed the U.S. producers had dumped chicken products on the Chinese market, caused substantial damage to China's domestic industry.

The statement also listed dumping margins for chicken products from producers who responded to the anti-dumping investigations from 43.1 percent to 80.5 percent and for those who did not respond to the investigations at 105.4 percent.

The investigations were launched on Sept. 27, 2009.
 

ajtr

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cross-posting from other forum:

The state-run Xinhua news agency cited the defence ministry as saying the suspension was due to the "severe harm" of the arms sales on relations between the US and China.

Why Chinese warn "xyz" country that "this action could harm relation between two countries. They have to think this when they do everything possible to harm relations.
INDIA

It will do no harm to the interests of India, but promote China-India ... for Peace and Prosperity, which marks a new era of bilateral relationship.
...

JAPAN

Vice Premier Urges Japan Not to Harm Bilateral Relations. Vice Premier Wu Yi and Japanese House of Representatives Speaker Yohei Kono met in Tokyo Monday to ..
INDIA

14 Oct 2009 ... Indian hegemony continues to harm relations with neighbors ... China to strengthen bilateral ties with Mongolia. Editor's Pick. Most Popular ...
US

Beijing against Google and US, Clinton's words could harm relations. China's Foreign Ministry strongly criticises the US secretary of state, ...

ARGINTINA

Beijing Says Falun Gong Out to Harm Relations with Argentina ... spiritual movement's attempt to damage bilateral relations, Beijing said Thursday. ... on bilateral relations and President Cristina Fernandez's planned visit to China
PHILIPINES

news China: Philippines sovereign claims may harm bilateral ties ... 2007 2009 relationship of china and philippines • relationship of china and philippines
PAKISTAN

al qaeda; - bilateral relations; - china; - chinese ambassador ... China asks Pak to be wary of separatist Turkestans designs to harm ties .
.
TURKY

Turkestan miscreants trying to harm ties, says China ... “No one can damage our bilateral relations, cooperation and traditional friendship.
SOUTH AFRICA

23 Mar 2009 ... South Africa is China's largest trading partner in Africa, ... that allowing the Dalai Lama into the country would harm bilateral relations. ...
RUSSIA

17 Dec 2005 ... The China Daily quoted Putin as saying the incident "should not harm bilateral relations". However, the slick is a reminder that water
FRANCE

22 Apr 2008 ... China has discouraged the actions of the "radical" protesters, ... She added that China should continue to harbor friendly bilateral relations with ... Over-the-top nationalism is not constructive, but can do harm to the ...
EVEN LAOS

Somsavat spoke highly of Laos-China relations and expressed thanks for the .... and stop doing things that harm the bilateral ties and hurt the feelings of ..
UK

29 Dec 2009 ... China executes Briton convicted of drug smuggling, despite UK pleas ... but said it hoped the case would not harm bilateral relations.
UK AGAIN

29 Dec 2009 ... We urge the UK to respect China's judicial sovereignty and correct its mistakes immediately to avoid doing harm to the bilateral relations. ...
CANADA

But many argue that the bilateral relationship is unlikely to teeter on this one event, ... referring to recent actions related to Burma and Sudan as examples. ... have anything to do with the Canada-China bilateral relationship as such." ... To mitigate any harm, Mr. Chin said, the government has made a serious ...
EVEN BURKINA FASO

18 Jan 2010 ... side would harm bilateral relations between the two countries.24 Jan 2010 ..... Burkina Faso Benin security hooligans bullets injured. ... Foreign Office appeals to China over death row Briton hit by Car driver Homes ...

In all there are 271.000 refrences on " harm bilateral relation china" on google. no country was spared. It seems they have an readymade farm at the foreign ministry ........................any thing happens........just fill in country name and fax to xinhua.
 
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amoy

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Reading through these quotations I couldn't help laughing. To be frank the Xinhua mouthpiece must enrich their English vocabulary. Instead of 'harm' or 'harmful rhetoric they should have diversified theirs with wording such as 'undermine' or 'detrimental' or 'upset' etc. .

Joke aside, with China's irrevocable opening up to the outside world since late 1970s and her tremendous expansion of interest globally, China inevitably is exposed to numerous frictions (confrontations sometimes). For instance in JAPAN case, that could be Japanese PM's visit of Yoshiguni Shrine to pay tribute to WW II war criminals. Or in PHILIPINES case the dispute over South China Sea islands.

All in all China has to be more cautious, sophisticated and tactful in dealing with all this. By now China hasn't 'grown up' yet.


BY THE WAY I happen to do random 'proof reading' of your paste - for example LAOS case - the full text is as follows,

People's Daily APR18
http://203.208.39.132/search?q=cach...=cn&st_usg=ALhdy29b7-nguBrhV7YrsB3OvPE48i822Q


Chinese FM Holds Talks with Lao Deputy Prime Minister
Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan Tuesday held talks with visiting Lao
Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Somsavat Lengsavad.
Tang said China and Laos are friendly neighbors and the development of
bilateral relations over the past four decades has been marked by the
mainstream of friendship and cooperation.
Somsavat is visiting China on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the
establishment of diplomatic relationship between the two countries.
In recent years, Tang said, exchanges of high-level visits have been
frequent and cooperation in various fields has deepened, Tang said. The two
countries have supported and cooperated with each other in regional and
international affairs, he said.
During Chinese President Jiang Zemin's successful state visit to Laos last
November, a joint declaration on bilateral cooperation was signed by the two
sides, which clearly defined the bilateral relationship in the new century,
the Chinese foreign minister added.
Tang said China is willing to work with Laos to enhance friendly cooperation
with Laos in various fields and make unremitting efforts to establish a
long-term, stable, good-neighborly and all-round cooperative relationship of
mutual trust between the two countries.
Somsavat spoke highly of Laos-China relations and expressed thanks for the
help and support given by the Chinese government
to Laos over the years. He
said the exchange of visits by top-leaders last year opened a new chapter in
their bilateral relationship.
He said the Lao party, government and people attach great importance to, and
would continue to enhance their traditional friendship and all-round
cooperation with China.
There's no such phrasing like
.... and stop doing things that harm the bilateral ties and hurt the feelings of ..
pls doublecheck to avoid 'distortion'.
 

mattster

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GO ahead China - That's right, go ahead and sanction Boeing for selling arms to Taiwan. We dare you !!

Hmmmmm........lets see now. They are only 2 major companies in the world that can make big passenger jets( > 200 passengers) - Boeing and Airbus.
And China needs hundreds of these aircraft over the next 10 years.

Sanction Boeing, and then you Chinamen will be getting the grease-pole so deep up your rear-end with Airbus that you will literally being seeing stars.
The is nothing like having a captive market when its comes to turning on the screws.

So yes, Lets see if the Chinese are really dumb enough to sanction Boeing Commercial Aircraft divison.

As long as Boeing and Airbus are the only 2 companies making big state of the art jets - every airline in the world will want to play both these companies off each other for the best price and deals.
 

amoy

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As long as Boeing and Airbus are the only 2 companies making big state of the art jets - every airline in the world will want to play both these companies off each other for the best price and deals.
Below report echos yours--


Don't worry about Boeing
February 3, 2010: Chinese threats to sanction Boeing are more sound than fury
Following the US decision to sell US$6 billion in arms to Taiwan, Beijing decided to play hard ball. Not only did it unleash the usual bluster about damaged ties and communications channel, but it added a significant threat: According to Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu, China will sanction the US firms involved in the sale, possibly including Boeing, which manufactures the Harpoon anti-ship missiles included in the Taiwan arms package. Following the announcement, speculation immediately turned to whether the sanctions would significantly damage Boeing's position in China, where it enjoys over a 50% share of the Chinese civil aviation market. Beijing has talked itself into a corner on this one. By mentioning sanctions it has bound itself to enact something in order to save face with the millions of nationalist hardliners, and it seems likely that it will have to enact some sort of punishment on Boeing. But whatever it does will have to be largely symbolic, because China has few options but to continue ordering from Boeing for the medium term, and possibly the long term.

First, switching costs are high. Using its typical market-access-for-technology-transfer contract structure, China has forced Boeing to outsource certain component manufacturing in China and to invest in R&D here. While the components Chinese factories supply to Boeing are basic - doors, wing fairings and the like - China needs basic help with aircraft production if it is to produce an airplane that does not have to be forced down the throats of Chinese airlines, such as the recent ARJ-21, which depends mostly on technology from the 1980s. Indeed, there are pervasive industry rumors that Boeing doesn't actually bother to use the components provided by its Chinese suppliers due to quality problems - one notes the curious omission of any mention of Chinese manufacturers in the 787 development team list. Nevertheless, the paltry US$600 million in subcontracts Boeing dished out in China is small change that China needs, or thinks it needs - for outsourced work, certainly, but more importantly because it needs the technology. So, China sanctions Boeing, Boeing quietly degrades its technology cooperation.

At the same time, keeping the existing fleet of Boeing airplanes in flight drives a lot of revenue in Boeing's direction, and the fleet of Chinese engineers and mechanics and pilots trained on Boeing technology can't simply become Airbus experts tomorrow. There are significant cost advantages for Chinese airlines to standardize maintenance around a limited number of models. All those plane still have to stay in the air for the next 20-30 years or so of their product lifecycle.

So what? China can always turn to Airbus, right? Well, yes and no. For one thing, unlike Boeing, Airbus isn't actually doing much component outsourcing for its new generation of aircraft, and definitely not be doing much in China. China may crow about the Airbus assembly plant in Tianjin, but there's not a lot of technology transfer in assembly. So moving to Airbus doesn't help with the technology transfer challenge. There is also a market problem. Standardization is nice, but when overdone it leads to overdependence. If China moves too far in Airbus's direction, it loses price negotiation leverage. And Beijing cannot have forgotten that French leaders have also sold arms to Taiwan, met with the Dalai Lama and famously protested the Olympics. Recently, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner demanded an explanation from China over Google's hacking claims. Switching from Boeing to Airbus does not solve any diplomatic problems related to cross-strait relations.

Understanding this last point, the nationalists and the less informed Western journalists are getting excited about the domestic option. Some of them may have believed Beijing when it said that the ARJ-21 was produced with "100% domestic intellectual property," but the plane is a derived McDonnell-Douglas design crammed with foreign avionics and running on foreign engines. The ARJ-21 is being pitched as a solution to China's "high, short runways" in western provinces. Maybe so, maybe so, but the high-altitude, short runways of western China are not exactly centers of passenger demand, and even if they were, the ARJ-21 is a regional jet in a market swamped with competition from smaller, better players. So much for the ARJ-21. What about the famous Comac C919, which is everywhere being touted as China's domestic jumbo-jet that will compete with A380 and the 787? Again, the Chinese definition of "jumbo" is similar to the definition of "100% domestic intellectual property." The C919, when finished, will hold 190 passengers max. The 787 will carry over 300 passengers. The A380, a flying opera house, can carry up to 555. The C919 is not going to compete with these planes. Statements of support from Chinese airlines should be taken with a grain of salt; Chinese carriers are famous for refusing to buy domestic aircraft, even when produced by joint-ventures. No, China does not have much of a domestic option, nor does turning to Airbus solve any of its problems. Boeing should worry a little, yes, but shorting Boeing in China is unlikely to pay off any time soon.
However, things are never stagnant - China has been coveting a slice of the aviation market ( captive market for the time being) with homegrown large aircraft (a natural up-the-ladder step in the value chain)- following sounds quite upbeat --

Development of Chinese large aircraft to restructure Int'l airline market
17:49, February 02, 2010
A model of C919 made by Commercial Aircraft Corp of China is displayed.(CNS photo by Yuanzhou)

By 2016, China's first independent engine will be completed and begin to drive the whole industry chain to develop simultaneously. Chinese large aircraft program has arrived at the start line.

The first Chinese large aircraft is expected to take off for the first time in 2014 before its navigability is certified in 2016. This year saw the beginning of orders being placed.

Chinese large aircraft must have "Chinese heart"

"If we compare aircraft manufacturing to a crown, then the engine development could be the pearl on the crown; it is quite difficult to develop the engine" said Liu Daxiang, member of China Engineering Academy and famous expert on aeronautical dynamics.

According to Liu, the dynamic problem is the key point to decide the large aircraft program's success or failure. Dynamic is the "heart" of equipment, and finally China's large aircraft must have "Chinese heart".

On Nov. 3 last year, a model of the first homegrown engine matching C919, future Chinese large aircraft, showed up at the 2009 China International Industry Fair in Shanghai, signifying China's important steps on the process of home-made large aircraft. The engine, numbered SF-A, is a kind of high bypass ratio turbofan engine with thrust between 12,000 and 13,000 kilograms.

China's large aircraft program is continues by the book

On the press release for the Aviation Expo/China 2009 (13th Expo), the first home-made large aircraft appeared before the public. Chen Jin, the head of the marketing department for the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China Ltd (COMAC), said the plane was officially named C919, it has 168 standard configuration seats, and expected to take off for the first time in 2014 before its navigability is certified in 2016; in 20 years, the annual production of large airliners and regional aircraft will be 150 and 50 respectively.

The large aircraft are usually cargo aircraft which can take off with a weight over 100 tons. They include large military and civilian planes and trunk liners with more than 150 seats. As of now, only America, 4 European countries and Russia are capable of making such large aircraft, and the international airline market has been dominated by Boeing of America and Airbus of Europe.

Now, China's aviation industry has the technological and material ability to make large aircraft. The State Council has approved the development of the large aircraft program in February 2007 and agreed to set up a large aircraft corporation. By March 2009, the "primary general technical scheme" of the large aircraft's developing had been finished.

International aviation market to be restructured

Wu Guanghui, the vice general manager of COMAC and the chief designer of large scale airliner, said Airbus and Boeing begin with letter of "A" and "B", while C919 beginning with letter of "C", which means China's big plane could also be strong on the international aviation market, and a new structure of "ABC" will be formed in future.

China has become the second biggest airline market for civilian use following U.S., during the period of "11th five-year plan", passenger capacity of airliners increased by 95 percent. By 2015, more than 2,000 aircraft will be needed in China. Chen Jin said the homegrown large aircraft will have a great advantage compared with other similar airliners, because C919's fuel consumption will be 12 percent to 15 percent less than its competitors.

According to Wu Guanghui, orders began being placed last year. Comac expects to build about 2,000 C919s over 20 years, and hopes to secure 10 percent of the global market
 
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Boeing and airbus will restructure to allow a competitor into their market another Chinese pipedream.
 

mattster

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The only new company that has the real potential of challenging Boeing or Airbus in the next 10 years on mid-size jets (between 150 - 250 passengers is Embraer of Brazil.

Their regional jets are already flying all over the world, and they are slowly stepping up to higher capacity mid-size passenger aircraft.

The Chinese may be able to make a mid-size jet with a foreign engine and avionics like the C919, but they will have a tough time competing with Boeing, Airbus, Embraer and even Bombadier of Canada. The C919 will probably be much less efficient than other planes and the only way for them to sell it is to force local Chinese airlines to buy it.
 

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