The Establishment of Pakistan

Holy Triad

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"most countries have an army, but Pakistan's army has a country. Even when it is not formally in power -- as it has been off and on for nearly half of Pakistan's 69-year history -- the Pakistani military wields tremendous influence as a kingmaker."

https://worldview.stratfor.com/article/pakistan-army-country








This thread has been started to track and analyze the hold and misuse of their nation by Pakistani military.

Pakistani Military establishment is often criticised for its role on promoting global terrorism,not accepting the casualties of serving men and women to save face,gross human rights violations in Baluchistan,FATA and pastuns,rigging elections and installing puppet government in thier home country,venturing commercial entities,encroaching public lands for personal businesses,bullying media and misleading the public from truth,etc

This thread is to document and educate about Pakistani Military.

I request the mods to make this thread sticky,

@ezsasa @Indx TechStyle @hit&run @LETHALFORCE @tarunraju


I invite my fellow DFI brethren to contribute and keep the thread alive.

@Mikesingh @Bhadra @porky_kicker @sorcerer @Assassin 2.0 @indiatester @IndianHawk @IndiaRising @Violent peaceful @muzzies slayer @MIDKNIGHT FENERIR-00 @Bhumihar @Ajax01 @Arihant @Lancer @Hydra3

Regards,
 
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Holy Triad

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Poor Nation, Rich Army
This Republic Day, Pakistan should consider why it remains underdeveloped as its military booms.


On March 23, Pakistan will celebrate its Republic Day with the same “zeal and fervor” as it does every year. As usual, the Pakistani military will come out in full force, with joint parades by the Army, the Air Force, and the Navy. The ostentatious marches will include a display of Pakistan’s nuclear-capable missile system, an air show, and gun salutes to local and international dignitaries present for the occasion.

The extravaganza is always broadcast live on local television channels, set to the fanfare of new propaganda songs produced especially for the event by the military’s media wing. It is rare for the public to question these theatrics—but doing so is more urgent than ever.

Pakistan is going through some serious financial turmoil. Over the last few months, Prime Minister Imran Khan has crisscrossed the globe in search of aid to shore up the economy. Before one recent trip, he even acknowledged the country’s desperation for foreign money. Meanwhile, the country’s finance minister, Asad Umar, has been busy negotiating a new bailout package with the International Monetary Fund—Pakistan has been in the care of the IMF for 22 years out of the last 30. Inflation is at a four-year high, reaching over 8 percent, and Islamabad believes that it could tick even higher.

One-third of Pakistan’s population lives under the poverty line, and the country is ranked at 150 out of 189 countries in the latest United Nations Human Development Index.

Although Pakistan’s recent economic woes are troubling, the country has faced similar pressures for years. One-third of its population lives under the poverty line, and the country is ranked at 150 out of 189 countries in the latest United Nations Human Development Index. The national debt stands at around $100 billion, while its foreign exchange reserves are a meager $15 billion. The value of the Pakistani rupee, one of the worst-performing currencies in Asia, has dropped 31 percent since 2017.

Yet anyone watching the parade on March 23 may believe that all is well. And they certainly won’t get the impression that the military is, in fact, behind many of the country’s economic problems. But after debt servicing, the military is Pakistan’s biggest economic burden. Already, over 20 percent of the annual budget officially goes to the military, but the armed forces have been pushing for more every year. Just in the last budget cycle, it won a 20 percent hike in its yearly allocation. The actual expense of the military is even higher, but it is hidden by moving some of the expenses to other budget lines. The parliament neither seriously debates the military budget nor subjects its spending to audit. By contrast, the country spends less than 5 percent of GDP on social services like education and health care, well below the regional average.

The military mainly protects itself by keeping the threat of India alive. The two nuclear-armed neighbors have been in conflict since the partition of South Asia in 1947. The militaries have fought four wars, with three of them over Kashmir valley. Even though Pakistan initiated these conflicts, it has told the public that it was only countering Indian aggression. In recent years, Pakistan has avoided a direct war, perhaps because it lost all previous ones. But it relies on militant groups based in Pakistan to keep tensions alive. This February offered a glimpse of such dynamics at play. In turn, the Pakistani Army gets the perfect excuse for its oversized burden on the country’s economy. Like a mafia protection racket, the military creates its own demand.

But it is not just the military’s budget that is eating away at the resources of a country that it has directly ruled for half of Pakistan’s 72 years of existence. Today, the armed forces’ empire has expanded well beyond its traditional role in security. It runs about 50 commercial entities. The military’s main business arm, the Fauji Foundation, has seen enormous growth. According to Bloomberg, its assets grew 78 percent between 2011 and 2015, and it has annual income over $1.5 billion. The military-backed organization has stakes in real estate, food, and the communications industry.

It appears that the business wing of the military is expanding even more under the Khan government. Khan’s critics allege that the military backed his candidacy and now, in return, enjoys relative freedom to do what it wants. There is plenty of evidence to back those claims.

Reuters recently reported that the Pakistani Army is moving into another lucrative industry: mining and oil exploration. Khan’s government is reportedly facilitating the arrangements by giving the military preferential treatment during negotiations.

Meanwhile, the military seems to be getting its way in a push to roll back a 2010 constitutional amendment that allotted more government funds for local government use, shrinking the available budget to the central government and hence limiting military disbursements. The government under President Asif Ali Zardari had been able to push through the amendment because the memory of military rule under Gen. Pervez Musharraf was still quite fresh. He had been ousted only 20 months earlier.



Since those days, it appears that the military’s influence is creeping back to the fore, and it wants to see the end of an amendment that it believes is a hindrance to its budgetary expansion. In March last year, the military chief of staff, Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, even spoke publicly against the 2010 amendment, which was widely reported by the local media. He even blamed the country’s financial woes on it. Now, the ruling party’s members are parroting similar concerns.

Islamabad must realize that the more the military budget expands, the harder it will be to push the institution back into a more appropriate and limited role in a country. Instead of parades like the one on March 23 that endorse further militarization, the country’s policymakers should use the day as an opportunity to think about why Pakistan remains poor as its armed forces continue to get richer.

There’s no better time for some introspection than Republic Day, when Pakistan’s founders passed a resolution demanding independence from British-controlled India. 72 years later, the country that got freedom from its colonial masters has now become hostage to its own military. The path to true independence and progress lies through peaceful economic development, not though a perpetual wartime economy.


https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/03/21/poor-nation-rich-army/
 
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Holy Triad

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A spotlight on the Pakistani military's corruption
22.04.2016


Pakistan's army has sacked six military officers over allegations of corruption. But analysts say it's a political move aimed at increasing pressure on PM Sharif, who's trying to come clean in a Panama Papers' scandal.
In the local media, Pakistan's army chief Raheel Sharif is being hailed as a "leader" who wants to eradicate corruption in the South Asian country. Last week, the general insisted that the battle against terrorism and corruption must go hand in hand. On Thursday, April 21, General Sharif dismissed six military officers, including two high-ranking generals, over allegations of corruption, thus proving that he is committed to his stance on financial irregularities.

It is an unprecedented move in the Islamic country, which was directly ruled by the military for a total of 35 years after the nation's independence. And the military still has the final say in matters related to defense, security and foreign policies.

The dismissal of army officers – who are not being tried for corruption, but have only been sent into early retirement – comes at a time when the civilian politicians are facing huge criticism over their own monetary corruption.



Army and opposition up pressure on PM Nawaz Sharif
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is facing one of the biggest political challenges of his tenure. The leaked Panama documents mentioned his family's ownership of offshore companies. Though the PM and his son deny any wrongdoing, there is a huge uproar in Pakistan, with opposition parties demanding his resignation, claiming the premier evaded taxes through these firms. On April 5, Sharif addressed the nation on television and announced that he was forming a judicial commission to investigate the allegations.

Now, after the removal of army officers in corruption cases, PM Sharif is under more pressure to come out clean in the Panama Papers' scandal.

"The army chief's decision to dismiss some high-ranking officers is an extraordinary step. It is a clear signal to politicians and other state institutions that they also need to put their house in order," Talat Masood, a former army general and defense analyst, told DW.

"Raheel Sharif has proven that he won't tolerate corruption. There is a bigger moral pressure on the politicians now," the analyst added.

The public opinion is rapidly turning against the premier, who, according to experts, needs to do something very quickly to thwart the crisis. At the same time, General Sharif is once again being hailed by many Pakistanis as a "messiah," who put the country on the path of prosperity.

Military's financial corruption

But critics of the army say that the dismissal of six army officers cannot sufficiently address the issue of military's massive financial corruption, which usually goes unnoticed. The Pakistani military keeps a lion's share of the country's budget and is not answerable to the civilian government over its expenditures, they say. Rights activists also assert that the fact that the army chief removed officers over corruption charges is proof that the military is not a "holy cow" as many in the country would like to believe.



Pakistan is facing an uphill battle against home-grown terrorism
"The corruption in the Pakistani military is as rampant as in any other state institution," Arif Jamal, a US-based Islamism and security analyst, told DW. "The army is involved in the smuggling of oil and narcotics through the borders of the western Balochistan province. The military also makes money through its checkpoints in the restive province. All drivers have to bribe the officers to pass through these posts. These are just a few examples," Jamal added.

Farooq Tariq, a leader of the socialist Awami Workers Party, claims the military's financial corruption goes beyond Balochistan: "The Pakistani army is involved in all spheres of the economy. It is running businesses all across the country, from marriage halls to factories, and from banks and insurance companies to dairy farms. Does the constitution allow this? Isn't it corruption as well," questioned Tariq.

"We must not forget that while people are celebrating General Sharif's 'resolve against corruption,' his army is cracking down on poor farmers in the Punjab's Okara region, trying to dispose them of their lands. Hundreds of cases have been registered against the military officers, yet the civilian administration has no authority to even interrogate them," Tariq said.

According to Tauseef Ahmed, an Islamabad-based political analyst, the military's financial corruption is no secret, but it is impossible for the civilian government to take action against army officers.

"Some time ago, Senator Farhatullah Babar told the Senate about 20 companies that are being run by the army. The Supreme Court passed a judgment against the army-administered Defense Housing Authority for encroaching lands across the country," Ahmed told DW. "In Karachi, the military-run Faziya housing scheme pumped millions of rupees into advertisements, prompting people to invest in housing. Later, the people lost all their money as it turned out that the land only existed on papers," Ahmed added.

Above the law?

The activists also decry the Pakistani military's alleged lack of respect for the rule of law. Last month, former military dictator, Pervez Musharraf, who is facing multiple charges in Pakistani courts, was allowed to leave the country to seek medical treatment abroad. Considering the nature of the cases against Musharraf, it should not have been that easy for him to exit Pakistan. The former general is accused of treason, and involvement in the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.

Analysts say it all comes down to the fact that Musharraf was a former military chief, and it was just a matter of time before he would be sent abroad.



Pervez Musharraf ruled the country from 1999 to 2007
"The military does not want to set a precedent where its officers are held accountable by the civilians," Usman Qazi, an Islamabad-based UN adviser, told DW.

"How can General Raheel Sharif talk about accountability of politicians when his own institution supported Musharraf whole-heartedly, facilitating his way out of the country?" Ahmed underlined.

Analyst Jamal finds a silver-lining for the politicians in the whole situation.

"The good thing about the dismissal of the army officers is that General Sharif's decision establishes that there is a lot of corruption in the Pakistani military," he said, adding that for the sake of transparency, the Pakistani military must give official details about each officer who were sacked.

"The punishments like dismissal from service or premature retirement with all privileges for proven corruption are too little and too late. For similar crimes, the politicians have been sent to jail. Former President Asif Ali Zardari spent many years behind bars for the alleged crimes that the military could never prove."


https://amp.dw.com/en/a-spotlight-on-the-pakistani-militarys-corruption/a-19207488
 

Holy Triad

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Pakistan Military Loves ‘Land’ More Than ‘Motherland’

Pakistan military’s lust for land is so prolific that their Generals conduct themselves in the manner of feudal landlords and carry the tags of ‘biggest land grabbers and land mafias’ of the country. The Supreme Court, in January this year, cracked the whip to stop commercial activities on military-owned land in the country. Supreme Court Judge Justice Gulzar Ahmed while passing the order observed: “Defence Housing Authority (DHA) of Karachi have encroached so far into the sea. If they had their way they would build a city on the sea. The owners of DHA would encroach on the entire sea all the way to America and then plant their flags there. The owners of DHA are wondering how they can make inroads into India!”

Justice Gulzar wondered why the armed forces and civil aviation authority were running wedding halls and cinemas. Each year the military gobbles up more land, diversifies into new markets and industries and steadily consolidates power in the key sectors of agriculture, energy, natural resources, logistics and construction. Little wonder, the land is being requisitioned across the length and breadth of the country. In a bid to make ‘Naya Pakistan’ (New Pakistan), Prime Minister Imran Khan called upon the armed forces to protect their ‘motherland’ on the Defence Day last year. It fell on the deaf ears of military elites who are more busy protecting their land rather than their ‘motherland’.

To repeat a cliché once more, ‘all countries have armies, but in Pakistan, the army has a country’. The army has long been expanding its footprints across Pakistan’s cities through its multiplying defence societies. The land is acquired at will at nominal rates from the state governments and developed into residential and commercial plots. Some of the richest families in the country live in some of the most garish houses in these housing colonies.

Pakistanis are inured to this unending land-grab. Huge swathes of land have been grabbed illegally by the army – some held as defence land, some as private land gifted to senior officers at the time of their retirement and some controlled by the ‘military foundations’ controlled by serving and retired generals. The insatiable lust for land continues unabated with grotesque impunity. The Generals continue to plot for plots!

A couple of years back in July 2016, the Pakistani Parliament was informed that the armed forces run over 50 commercial entities worth over $20 billion. Ranging from petrol pumps to huge industrial plants, banks, bakeries, schools and universities, hosiery factories, milk dairies, stud farms and cement plants, the military has a finger in every pie and is today the biggest conglomerate among business houses in Pakistan. However, the jewels in their crown are the housing societies in eight major towns where prime lands in well-manicured cantonments and plush civil localities in the possession of these societies are allotted to military personnel at highly subsidized rates. Even military awards and post-retirement benefits are linked with the grant of farmlands and housing plots to military personnel. In the recent past, a former Army Chief was bestowed with 88 acres of land as a post-retirement benefit.

The Pakistani military’s love for land grabbing has been well documented by defence analyst Ayesha Siddiqa in her seminal book ‘Military Inc: Inside Pakistan’s Military Economy’. Her book elucidates, that militaries in China, Egypt and Indonesia run large business enterprises but Pakistani Generals have done better than their counterparts through their defence societies. This book exposes the rampant commercialism pervading in every aspect of the country’s military forces. According to Siddiqa, the army owns 12 per cent of the country’s land, and two-thirds of that land is in the hands of senior military officials, mostly Brigadiers and Generals.

During General Zia’s dictatorship and the rise of extremism in Pakistan, with jihadis doing most of the work for the Pakistan Army, Pakistan military’s top brass, particularly, the retired and serving mid and senior level officers, have increasingly focused efforts on acquiring land for property development and also setting up various businesses with the aim of creating a monopoly for various products in the market. The so-called charitable foundations, the Fauji Foundation (run by retired senior Pakistani Army officers), the Shaheen Foundation (run by retired Pakistan Air Force officers) and the Bahria Foundation (run by retired senior officers of Pakistan Navy) are in reality business conglomerates where only retired and serving officers are entitled to a share of the profits.

Two-star General officers and above get 240 acres of irrigated land and the land owned by military officers always get more water for irrigation as compared to other farmers. While urban real estate is limited to military officers, farmland is also given to personnel below the officers’ rank.

Shuja Nawaz in his book, ‘Crossed Swords’, highlighted the brazenness of land grab tendencies of the Pakistani military. He wrote, “late 1980s, as dictator fatigue set in the Zia period, many army officers refrained from going out in the public in their uniforms as there was much resentment against them for their over-indulgence in economic activities.” Later in 2007, the country witnessed jarring posters and banners carried by lawyers who were protesting the removal of the Chief Justice of Pakistan, Justice Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry by the then Military ruler General Parvez Musharraf: “Ae watan ke sajeele Genrailo; saaray ruqbey tunhare liye hain (O’ handsome Generals of the homeland, all the plots are just for you).”

In August 2016, Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper also published an article highlighting the role of army Generals in land grabbing cases. There is little that anyone can do against the all-powerful Pakistani military. The illegal land grab and brazen means to legalize it has been well planned by the army and its wings. At least in this endeavour, the Pakistani armed forces have achieved tri-services integration as no other has.

Prime Minister Imran Khan’s dream project ‘Naya Pakistan Housing Program’ is all set to be launched in April next month which promises to boost the economy by creating job opportunities in the construction sector and allied industries. But the implementation of five million housing units for the poor Pakistanis is a risky proposition until the issue of land grabbing is settled.
The Imran Khan cabinet on March 19 decided to sell off property and assets of different federal ministries and allied departments worth trillions of rupees with a view to generating revenue to support the country’s crippling economy. It’s anybody’s guess how much land would land up with the army and to its Generals as their private property. Trillions, if not more, would be made by the Generals alone who shamelessly bleed the country they supposedly protect.

While PM Imran Khan roams the friendly countries for loans to bail the country out of the crisis of balance of payments as Pakistan’s foreign exchange reserves keep depleting with only adequate funds for a few weeks imports, the valuation of land owned by the four military foundations established for the welfare of ex-servicemen is many times more. Yet, it’s hard to imagine anyone managing to circumscribe the financial powers of this military machine. The fact remains that the military does not just run Pakistan, they own it too.

https://bharatshakti.in/pakistan-military-loves-land-more-than-motherland/
 

Holy Triad

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Inside Pakistan’s biggest business conglomerate: the Pakistani military

In July 2016, the Pakistani senate was informed that the armed forces run over 50 commercial entities worth over $20 billion. Ranging from petrol pumps to huge industrial plants, banks, bakeries, schools and universities, hosiery factories, milk dairies, stud farms, and cement plants, the military has a finger in each pie and stands today as the biggest conglomerate of all business in Pakistan. However, the jewels in their crown are the eight housing societies in eight major towns where prime lands in well-manicured cantonments and plush civil localities in the possession of these societies are allotted to military personnel at highly subsidised rates. Even military awards are linked with the grant of farm lands and housing plots to military personnel.

Shuja Nawaz in his book, Crossed Swords, expounds the landgrabbing propensities of Pakistani generals. He goes on to say that in the “late 1980s, as dictator fatigue set in during the Zia period, many army officers refrained from going out into the public in their uniforms as there was much resentment against the military for their over-indulgence in economic activities.” Later in 2007, “the country saw the jarring banners carried by lawyers who were protesting the removal of a chief justice by the military ruler: Ae watan ke sajeele Genrailo; saaray ruqbey tumhare liye hain (O’ handsome generals of the homeland, all the plots are just for you).”

Genesis in the General
The “Culture of Entitlement” in the military started during General Ayub’s time when he commenced the tradition of awarding land to army officers (the size of allotment depending upon the rank of the officer) in the border regions of Punjab and in the newly irrigated colonies of Sindh. General Zia also created a novel way of involving serving officers in commercial ventures by placing military lands and cantonments and the provisioning of logistics to the regional corps commanders. Thus, many senior army officers availed opportunities to acquire multiple plots in various cantonments for themselves at highly subsidised rates. These prime properties soon sparked nepotism in allotment and corruption among both the military and civil bureaucracies.


After being allotted plots in prime areas, it became common practice for army officers to sell their preferential allotments at exorbitant prices to well-heeled civilians. The military soon got involved in establishing several foundations ostensibly to help retired service personnel. These institutions virtually penetrated into all sectors of the economy and gradually propelled the military into a major business stakeholder in Pakistan’s economy. The military operates its economic endeavours at three levels with the ministry of defence (MoD) being at the top of the economic military network.

The MoD controls four major areas—the service headquarters, the department of military land and cantonments (MLC), the Fauji Foundation (also known as Fauji Group) and the Rangers (a paramilitary force). The department of military land and cantonments acquires land for allocation to the service headquarters, which distributes it among individual members. The three services have independent welfare foundations, which are directly controlled by the senior officers of the respective services. The military is also involved in public sector organisations like the National Logistics Cell (NLC), the Frontier Works Organisation (FWO) and the Special Communications Organisation (SCO), which are all controlled by the army. The Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA) was placed under military control in 1998 with over 35,000 personnel now involved in its operations.

You name it and the military has it
The MOD does not directly manage the economic activities of the organisations under its control, but it is an instrument to mobilise resources, accord legitimacy to the varying commercial and other economic activities of its organisations and even field formations and units which run many subsidiary commercial ventures independently. In addition, there are four subsidiary organisations that are involved in the economic activities of the military. These include the Fauji Foundation, Army Welfare Trust, Shaheen Foundation (for retired Pakistan Air Force personnel) and the Bahria Foundation (for retired Navy personnel). These foundations, though controlled by their respective service headquarters, are run by retired military personnel. The profits accruing from the commercial ventures of these organizations are distributed to all shareholders who are retired military personnel. These are engaged in ventures like fertiliser and cement manufacture, cereal production, insurance and banking enterprises, education, and information technology institutes, besides airport services, travel agencies, shipping, harbour services and deep sea fisheries.


The influence of the MOD plays a vital role in securing public sector business contracts and financial and industrial inputs at highly subsidised rates. In recent years, profit making by retired military personnel has acquired even newer dimensions with them providing privatised security services to foreign contractors in security-sensitive regions like the FATA and KPK (Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa). This follows the pattern as established by foreign security contractors in adjoining Afghanistan.

The Culture of Entitlement is getting stronger by the day. Several senior service officers have also been parked as ambassadors, governors, and nominated on other high-ranking bureaucratic posts in Pakistan. Successive army chiefs have continued with the practice of strengthening the special perks and privileges of their serving and retired personnel with respective civilian governments reluctantly acquiescing to all the fair and unfair demands of the armed forces.

It is an indisputable fact that Milbus contributes towards professionalism taking its toll when the military participates in nonmilitary commercial activities. The case of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) in China is a classic example where some senior Chinese generals fell prey to the temptations of corruption and lucre. True to their style, the Chinese government stepped in and severely punished some of the offenders and thus discouraged the Chinese military from commercial activities.


Milbus in Pakistan is the never-fading and ever-growing clout of its military in its nation’s policies far beyond strategic and security matters. A major reason for this state of affairs is the independent, unaccountable financial muscle of the military. Since the Ayub era, no civilian government has ever bothered to tame in the military except, to some extent, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto for a short period. Most civilian governments have looked the other way at the financial handlings of the military’s commercial enterprises, primarily to buy peace with the powerful generals. Most members of Pakistan’s civil society and even its parliamentarians have wilfully ignored the military’s economic empire-building except for some senators like Sherry Rehman and Farhatullah Babar.

Among the many constants in Pakistan, Milbus too, in the foreseeable future, is likely to more than thrive as it is coterminous with the power wielded by the military in its national affairs. Currently, there are no indicators whatsoever that the Pakistan military will ever relinquish the primacy and unfettered powers it enjoys in its nation.


https://qz.com/india/1134516/inside...ness-conglomerate-the-pakistani-military/amp/
 
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This thread is to document and educate about Pakistani Military.

I request the mods to make this thread sticky,

@ezsasa @Indx TechStyle @hit&run @LETHALFORCE @tarunraju
Further, thanks for the tag. Please note that tagging more than 5 people may not notify more than 5 or probably even all of them.

I just changed the title of the thread to "The Establishment" replacing it by Pakistani army, it being the most common name about the military deep state ran in Pakistan.

It's not the case of neccesarily defamation of Pakistan but a known fact and has widespread coverage in independent sources and scholastic researches.

The Establishment (Pakistan) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I have even better independent sources to cover it.

As Pakistani military holds most of political and economic control of their country, why not cover all that in entirety rather than just corruption. It could be misuse of state as well as well as insight of control of industries. Pakistani army, navy and air force hold a number of assets and businesses worth coverage.

Proper moderation and decent language can make this thread featured in DFI. A broader relevant discussion will make it easier to update thread as well to make it sticky?

So, do I have permission to have your thread for this task with title changed as just "The Establishment" and let members cover all these aspects?

I want to have a number of intellectual threads by Indian perspective. @ezsasa
 

Holy Triad

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So, do I have permission to have your thread for this task with title changed as just "The Establishment" and let members cover all these aspects?
I understand and accept your intent on the title change,but I also request you to moderate the same. (I mean Plz allow Only posts on related on Pakistan establishments,not "what about xyz militaries type of post)

Proper moderation and decent language can make this thread featured in DFI. A broader relevant discussion will make it easier to update thread as well to make it sticky?
I abide by the rules of DFI and
expect nothing more,nothing less.

Looking forward to read your and other member posts, :)


Regards,
 

Holy Triad

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From the horse's mouth,

Army, corruption and terrorism



OPINION


The definition of an army is that it is “a large organised body of armed personnel trained for war, especially on land”. The words of Quaid-e-Azam to the army are very indicative of his vision of its role. He stated, “You will have to be alert, very alert, for the time for relaxation is not yet there. With faith, discipline, and selfless devotion to duty, there is nothing worthwhile that you cannot achieve.”
Today, the Pakistan Army has widened the landscape of its activities due to myriad factors that in more ways than one have had an impact on the survivability and sustainability of the motherland. Its primary assignment as the defender of the borders has been compounded significantly with various exigencies that have necessitated direct involvement either in a supporting role or, when it became imperative, from a vantage position.

Pakistan's status as a geo-strategically important country, with many advantages and benefits, unfortunately has been affected by the belligerence, hostility, and meddling of countries on the western and eastern borders. Pakistan was propelled into being the frontline state in the Global War on Terror. The war is being fought not only at the borders but also within the country. Inimical forces, boosted by foreign funding and support, have created havoc with serious repercussions to the integrity and sovereignty of the nation. The colossal loss of men, material, and money has seriously damaged the progress and prosperity of Pakistan.

Terrorism and extremism filtered down to Karachi, the economic hub of the nation. Karachi was in the throes of near anarchy where the city of lights was ruthlessly relegated to become the city of doom. Militancy and breakdown in the law and order situation stained the image of the metropolis and its citizens became captive to the will and might of desperadoes, especially those who had the backing of political parties or extremist organisations. The politicised police force was unable to exercise its writ. The city, province, and federal governments were over-involved in political squabbling and point scoring, much to the chagrin of the Karachi residents.

The private sector was between the devil and the deep blue sea. Investment, commerce, and industry became hostage to the twin menace of terrorism as well as corruption. These two heads of the hydra damaged the comfort zone enjoyed by the private sector, forcing them to seek safer foreign avenues of doing business as well as securing a safe environment for their families and finances. Trade and industry graph nose-dived, educational institutions were under attack, and foreigners made a hasty retreat.

The induction of Pakistan Rangers in Karachi was much desired and welcomed by trade and industry. Karachi Chamber of Commerce and Industry hierarchy was vociferously demanding the implementation of a plan to eliminate terrorism as well as corruption. The men and vehicles of the Pakistan Rangers have been a ubiquitous sight in Karachi for nearly a quarter of a century, and are gradually implementing Operation Clean-up. Despite calls for a fast track response and action, the Rangers have proceeded at their own real time pace and the effectiveness of their operations has restored normalcy to a large extent. In fact, the successes of the last two years have transformed Karachi into a relatively peaceful metropolis as is evident from the upsurge in real estate prices, the huge presence of customers in shopping districts, markets, and plazas, and the booming and bullish activity at the Pakistan Stock Exchange in the city.

It was assumed that the operation against militants and terrorists would be expanded to Interior Sindh and that within a specified timeframe the success in Karachi would be replicated there too. However, political roadblocks, parochial vested interests, and the aversion of the government hierarchy thwarted all notions of operation clean-up in interior Sindh. The rationale is still unpalatable, and for Karachi residents, unacceptable and creating a profound sense of acrimony. This also gave rise to the oft-repeated allegation that the entire operation clean-up was only specific to Karachi and an urban-based political party.

Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif reiterated Pakistan Army’s resolve in breaking down the nexus between terrorism and corruption. He very rightly established that there is an organic link between corruption and terrorism and hence targeting corruption would diminish the hold of the terrorists since these ill-gotten funds are channelised to terrorists too. Corruption is not just Pakistan-specific since it is endemic in most of the third world countries and in some developed nations too. However, the magnitude of corruption has spread ominously and has ensued into a sinister situation where local citizens as well as foreign investors have placed corruption at the top of the list of the damaging factors affecting Pakistan's economic progress and prosperity. The disclosure by the COAS gives further credence to this negativity.



Moreover, the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is a welcome initiative and is heralded as the beginning of global confidence in Pakistan. In today's difficult times, CPEC has instilled hope that its success would be a showcase that Pakistan could exhibit to attract global investment and interest in Pakistan. This is further encouraged by the fact that Pakistan Army is fully behind its implementation and that a special security force has been established to provide security, safety, and confidence to those Chinese citizens who are or will be based in Pakistan. The essence of these measures is akin to the security of the country's strategic assets and is a manifestation of the success of Zarb-e-Azb and other measures.

Corruption is a defining factor that should be termed as economic terrorism. Under the National Action Plan (NAP), corruption has to be tackled on a war-footing basis. Pakistan Rangers Sindh has hinted at nabbing the corrupt in government, in political parties, and in other sectors. However, influential and high profile personalities, known for amassing huge ill-gotten wealth were deliberately permitted to leave the country or are still unabashedly allowed to continue their nefarious activities. National Accountability Bureau (NAB) is a toothless tiger catching small league players while cases against top-notch persons are gathering dust.

The resolve of the army to arrest the corrupt, whether high profile or not, is yet to be seen in genuine reality. The question arises whether there is seriousness in this matter or are there other compelling reasons. There has been no let down in the corruption syndrome and, like termites, it is eating away the moral fabric of the nation. Citizens are taking the announcements of arresting the corrupt by NAB, Federal Investigation Agency, or through NAP with a pinch of salt. At present, these are hollow claims since no tangible effort has commenced.

Recently, there was a renewed call from GHQ for a full-force implementation of NAP, since it has so far been a lackadaisical process and since the fruits of the plan have not been fully realised. It must be implemented in letter and spirit all over the country because the dastardly impact of extremism and terrorism are not isolated cases. The tentacles are spread from Karachi to deep inside North Waziristan Agency. Operation Zarb-e-Azb, despite a heavy toll of men, material and money, has indiscriminately eliminated many areas from the menace of terrorism and militancy. Notwithstanding these successes, it is a fact that terrorism and militancy is still entrenched in many parts of Pakistan.

The 200 million citizens of Pakistan have always looked up to the Pakistan Army. The Founder of Pakistan's message is so true today. He said, "Let us now plan to build and reconstruct and regenerate our great nation…. Now is the time, chance and opportunity for every Pakistani to make his or her fullest and best contribution and make the greatest sacrifice and work ceaselessly in the service of our nation and make Pakistan one of the greatest nations of the world.”

The writer is former president KCCI

https://www.thenews.com.pk/amp/152569-Army-corruption-and-terrorism
 
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Just for introduction, a couple of military run conglomerates are:
  1. Fauji Foundation (General military)
  2. Shaheen Foundation (General military)
  3. Baharia Foundation (Navy)
  4. Askari Group of Companies (Army)
  5. Shaheen Foundation (Air Force)
Pakistani military runs a number of companies in FMCG sector to real estate. And this shadow economy is what protects them when Pakistani economy fails. We barely see any depression in military budget, no matter how hard Pakistani economy gets hit.
Directly and indirectly, Pakistani military controls over 80% of Pakistan's total national wealth.
 
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Old article from 2016.
Material Copyright: The Dawn
50 commercial entities being run by armed forces
ISLAMABAD: The Senate was provided on Wednesday details of commercial entities being run by various wings of the armed forces in the country.

In a written reply to a question asked by Senator Farhatullah Babar of the Pakistan Peoples Party, Defence Minister Khwaja Asif informed the house that there were nearly 50 “projects, units and housing colonies” functioning in the country under the administrative control of Fauji Foundation, Shaheen Foundation, Bahria Foundation, Army Welfare Trust (AWT) and Defence Housing Authorities (DHAs).

According to the details provided in the reply, eight DHAs were established in major cities. These DHAs — mostly created through ordinances — are in Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi-Islamabad, Multan, Gujranwala, Bahawalpur, Peshawar and Quetta.

Besides, there are 16 “projects/units” functioning under the AWT, 15 under the Fauji Foundation and 11 under the Shaheen Foundation.

The house was informed that Bahria Foundation was not administrating any housing colony in Pakistan, “however, an offshore tolling type LNG project is under its consideration”.
Bahria Foundation not administrating any housing colony, Senate told
The projects/units being run by the AWT are:
  1. Two stud farms in Pakpattan and Okara
  2. Army Welfare Sugar Mills, Badin
  3. Askari Project (shoe and woollen), Lahore
  4. Army Welfare Mess and Blue Lagoon Restaurant, Rawalpindi
  5. Real estate comprising three small housing schemes in Lahore, Badaber and Sangjani
  6. Askari General Insurance Co Ltd Rawalpindi
  7. Askari Aviation Services, Rawalpindi
  8. MAL Pakistan Ltd Karachi
  9. Askari Guards (Pvt) Ltd, head office (HO) in Rawalpindi
  10. Askari Fuels (CNG) with HO in Rawalpindi
  11. Askari Seeds, Okara
  12. Askari Enterprises, Rawalpindi
  13. Fauji Security Services (acquired from Fauji Foundation), HO in Rawalpindi
  14. Askari Apparel, Lahore
  15. Askari Lagoon, Faisalabad.
The projects/units under Fauji Foundation are:
  1. Fauji Cereals
  2. Foundation Gas
  3. Fauji Fertiliser Company Ltd
  4. Fauji Cement Co Ltd
  5. Fauji Oil Terminal and Distillery Co Ltd
  6. Fauji Kabirwala Power Company Ltd
  7. Foundation Power Co (Dharki) Ltd
  8. Askari Cement Ltd
  9. Askari Bank Ltd
  10. Foundation Wind Energy (I and II) Ltd
  11. Noon Pakistan Ltd Lahore
  12. Fauji Meat Ltd
  13. Fauji Fertiliser Bin Qasim Ltd
  14. Fauji Akbar Partia Marine Terminal Ltd, HO in Karachi.
A company under the name of Pakistan Maroc Phosphore SA was set up in Morocco by the Fauji Foundation in 2008.

Similarly, the projects, units and housing colonies under the administrative control of Shaheen Foundation, which is a trust of the Pakistan Air Force, are:

  1. Shaheen Airport Services
  2. Shaheen Aerotraders
  3. Shaheen Knitwear
  4. Shaheen Complex, Karachi
  5. Shaheen Complex, Lahore
  6. Shaheen Medical Services
  7. Hawk Advertising
  8. Fazaia Welfare Education School System
  9. SAPS Aviation College
  10. Air Eagle Aviation Academy
  11. Shaheen Welfare Housing Scheme, Peshawar.
The Senate was told that Shaheen Foundation was established in 1977 under the Charitable Endowment Act 1890 “to promote welfare activities for the benefit of serving and retired PAF personnel, including civilians and their dependents, and to this end generate fund through industrial and commercial enterprises”.
Turkish people supported
Later, the house unanimously passed a resolution expressing solidarity with the democratic government and people of Turkey. The resolution was tabled by Azam Swati of the Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf.

“The Senate admires, congratulates and pays its tribute to the brave people of Turkey who displayed an uncommon courage by upholding democratic norms and defeated military coup and saved their country from anarchy and civil war,” says the resolution.

“It was so moving to see common Turks took to the streets and world witnessed that human flesh stopped steel tanks on just a single call of its leader, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan,” says the resolution, which “admired all opposition political parties for their historic and unprecedented resolve to protect democracy.”

During the question hour, Law Minister Zahid Hamid informed the house that India had made 460km-long fence along the Line of Control (LoC).

He said the issue of LoC violations by India had been raised at the UN Security Council through a letter that had also been circulated among all its members.
 
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Old article from 2016.
Material Copyright: The Dawn
50 commercial entities being run by armed forces

Bahria Foundation not administrating any housing colony, Senate told
The projects/units being run by the AWT are:
  1. Two stud farms in Pakpattan and Okara
  2. Army Welfare Sugar Mills, Badin
  3. Askari Project (shoe and woollen), Lahore
  4. Army Welfare Mess and Blue Lagoon Restaurant, Rawalpindi
  5. Real estate comprising three small housing schemes in Lahore, Badaber and Sangjani
  6. Askari General Insurance Co Ltd Rawalpindi
  7. Askari Aviation Services, Rawalpindi
  8. MAL Pakistan Ltd Karachi
  9. Askari Guards (Pvt) Ltd, head office (HO) in Rawalpindi
  10. Askari Fuels (CNG) with HO in Rawalpindi
  11. Askari Seeds, Okara
  12. Askari Enterprises, Rawalpindi
  13. Fauji Security Services (acquired from Fauji Foundation), HO in Rawalpindi
  14. Askari Apparel, Lahore
  15. Askari Lagoon, Faisalabad.
The projects/units under Fauji Foundation are:
  1. Fauji Cereals
  2. Foundation Gas
  3. Fauji Fertiliser Company Ltd
  4. Fauji Cement Co Ltd
  5. Fauji Oil Terminal and Distillery Co Ltd
  6. Fauji Kabirwala Power Company Ltd
  7. Foundation Power Co (Dharki) Ltd
  8. Askari Cement Ltd
  9. Askari Bank Ltd
  10. Foundation Wind Energy (I and II) Ltd
  11. Noon Pakistan Ltd Lahore
  12. Fauji Meat Ltd
  13. Fauji Fertiliser Bin Qasim Ltd
  14. Fauji Akbar Partia Marine Terminal Ltd, HO in Karachi.
A company under the name of Pakistan Maroc Phosphore SA was set up in Morocco by the Fauji Foundation in 2008.

Similarly, the projects, units and housing colonies under the administrative control of Shaheen Foundation, which is a trust of the Pakistan Air Force, are:

  1. Shaheen Airport Services
  2. Shaheen Aerotraders
  3. Shaheen Knitwear
  4. Shaheen Complex, Karachi
  5. Shaheen Complex, Lahore
  6. Shaheen Medical Services
  7. Hawk Advertising
  8. Fazaia Welfare Education School System
  9. SAPS Aviation College
  10. Air Eagle Aviation Academy
  11. Shaheen Welfare Housing Scheme, Peshawar.


Turkish people supported
Wondering if there is something army doesn't manufacture. Though, as usual from above article, just saying:
He said the issue of LoC violations by India had been raised at the UN Security Council through a letter that had also been circulated among all its members.
 

Holy Triad

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Pakistani Military establishment has a nickname for them "invader of corner plots":rofl:
(I kid you not,just Google yourself :D)

The Pakistani mil. establishment has an habit of encroaching public/pvt. Lands(especially corner plots) for commercial ventures

That's how the term "invader of corner plot" got gained popularity among those follow their affairs.


"
The Pakistani military's "welfare foundations" run thousands of businesses worth tens of billions of dollars, ranging from street-corner petrol pumps to sprawling industrial plants, says Ayesha Siddiqa, the author of Military Inc: Inside Pakistan's Military Economy."

https://www.aljazeera.com/amp/focus/pakistanpowerandpolitics/2007/10/2008525184515984128.html
 
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Old article from 2016.
Material Copyright: The Dawn
50 commercial entities being run by armed forces

Bahria Foundation not administrating any housing colony, Senate told
The projects/units being run by the AWT are:
  1. Two stud farms in Pakpattan and Okara
  2. Army Welfare Sugar Mills, Badin
  3. Askari Project (shoe and woollen), Lahore
  4. Army Welfare Mess and Blue Lagoon Restaurant, Rawalpindi
  5. Real estate comprising three small housing schemes in Lahore, Badaber and Sangjani
  6. Askari General Insurance Co Ltd Rawalpindi
  7. Askari Aviation Services, Rawalpindi
  8. MAL Pakistan Ltd Karachi
  9. Askari Guards (Pvt) Ltd, head office (HO) in Rawalpindi
  10. Askari Fuels (CNG) with HO in Rawalpindi
  11. Askari Seeds, Okara
  12. Askari Enterprises, Rawalpindi
  13. Fauji Security Services (acquired from Fauji Foundation), HO in Rawalpindi
  14. Askari Apparel, Lahore
  15. Askari Lagoon, Faisalabad.
The projects/units under Fauji Foundation are:
  1. Fauji Cereals
  2. Foundation Gas
  3. Fauji Fertiliser Company Ltd
  4. Fauji Cement Co Ltd
  5. Fauji Oil Terminal and Distillery Co Ltd
  6. Fauji Kabirwala Power Company Ltd
  7. Foundation Power Co (Dharki) Ltd
  8. Askari Cement Ltd
  9. Askari Bank Ltd
  10. Foundation Wind Energy (I and II) Ltd
  11. Noon Pakistan Ltd Lahore
  12. Fauji Meat Ltd
  13. Fauji Fertiliser Bin Qasim Ltd
  14. Fauji Akbar Partia Marine Terminal Ltd, HO in Karachi.
A company under the name of Pakistan Maroc Phosphore SA was set up in Morocco by the Fauji Foundation in 2008.

Similarly, the projects, units and housing colonies under the administrative control of Shaheen Foundation, which is a trust of the Pakistan Air Force, are:

  1. Shaheen Airport Services
  2. Shaheen Aerotraders
  3. Shaheen Knitwear
  4. Shaheen Complex, Karachi
  5. Shaheen Complex, Lahore
  6. Shaheen Medical Services
  7. Hawk Advertising
  8. Fazaia Welfare Education School System
  9. SAPS Aviation College
  10. Air Eagle Aviation Academy
  11. Shaheen Welfare Housing Scheme, Peshawar.


Turkish people supported
Still watching at this post of mine. I don't wish to troll but I think there is a reason why trolls call it a popcorn selling army.
 
Last edited:

Holy Triad

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This post is dedicated to PAF's corruption,

PAF converts land for ‘national security’ into housing scheme in Lahore
Malik Asad


2020 10:05am
Housing society approved for PAF martyrs defrauded people of billions, NAB tells court

https://www.dawn.com/news/1528488/h...-defrauded-people-of-billions-nab-tells-court


According to the FIA inquiry, a total 13 retired officers of Pakistan Army and Pakistan Air Force (PAF) have been allegedly found involved in the corruption scandal including one each retired lieutenant general and air marshal, two retired major generals, six retired air vice-marshals, two retired brigadiers and one retired air commodore.

https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/20...y0KWijuz6aYrg9e0brrnAXk4FU80w20VwfS0SY44jzxuM
 

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