The difference between Chinese roads and Indian ones

libindi

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Maybe you are right,there are many empty roads,but as a common folk,im glad about that,maybe in the future we can use those to ease the stress of current chinese roads in many city,because the traffic jam during after work hour is getting more and more like a nightmare in my city,make you want to just get out of your car and walk home:mad:

i believe the reality is even worse than this picture showed
 
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nimo_cn

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libindi, what is the point of filling a full bottle?

Sent from my T8830 using Tapatalk 2
 

Ray

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Chinese roads are fantastic.

China understand the importance of building infrastructure way better than India.
 

buhoumon

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Investing construction is an effective way to decrease the unemployment rate while keeping the econ grows probably.

Having lived in Beijing for yrs, love the subway system, expect during peak time though. lol.
 

pmaitra

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Do you know what so much investment and debt really means? It means most of China's roads are undertraveled and in many cases, practically deserted. Like all other things China does, it has vast overcapacity of highways that it cannot turn a profit. When you build so much you are going to have most of it empty.

The Dark Side Of Chinese Infrastructure: Empty Highways, Unprofitable Ports And Too Many Airports And Trains - Business Insider
I think you are misinformed, and are misinforming everyone else. Here is the reality:



Gridlock as China begins its 'Golden Week' holidays

A decision to grant free road travel meant hundreds of thousands of Chinese drivers spent the first day of the mid-autumn festival in gridlock.
Source: Gridlock as China begins its 'Golden Week' holidays - Telegraph
 

Armand2REP

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Cities of millions will have hot spots of traffic, but you are ignoring the majority of highways that do not see it. All those reports are Autumn festival or peak rush hour. It is not like that most of the day and in many parts, a desert of asphalt.
 

libindi

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Cities of millions will have hot spots of traffic, but you are ignoring the majority of highways that do not see it. All those reports are Autumn festival or peak rush hour. It is not like that most of the day and in many parts, a desert of asphalt.
Yeah,talk like you have seen the majority of highways in china,i guess thats why you are a "expert":confused:
 

badguy2000

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Do you know what so much investment and debt really means? It means most of China's roads are undertraveled and in many cases, practically deserted. Like all other things China does, it has vast overcapacity of highways that it cannot turn a profit. When you build so much you are going to have most of it empty.

The Dark Side Of Chinese Infrastructure: Empty Highways, Unprofitable Ports And Too Many Airports And Trains - Business Insider
well, China's population is 20+ times more than France's..

China's area is 20 times more than France's

so,it is quite normal that CHina's road lenth is 20 time of France's

BTW, you pick a wrong time to scream "CHIna's road is empty",when over 100M CHinese are jamed on road,for their "golden-week holidy plan".

.
 
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rockdog

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Cities of millions will have hot spots of traffic, but you are ignoring the majority of highways that do not see it. All those reports are Autumn festival or peak rush hour. It is not like that most of the day and in many parts, a desert of asphalt.
1. Investing Highway is still the most profit business in China, even higher than Chinese famous liqueur industry, if you check the most famous Chinese liqueur Moutai, its profit in 2011 is 90%, but the Chongqing Highway Group gained 91%!, according the the financial report from Shanghai Stock Market.

Don't forget that the Chongqing is a city in the Southwest, far away from the coastal city belt.
(高速公路上市公司利润惊人 部分企业毛利达91%_雅虎财经)


2. Built good infrastructures 5-10 yrs ahead is normal in China, that's why the middle and west of China would smoothly adopt the industrial transition from coastal cites on manufacture in labor intensive field. That's way China won't lose the advantage on labor cost competing other nations like Vietnam and India.

That's why as a French, a empty road (in fact it's not) might not understandable, about for Chinese that's quite reasonable, since according to your nations' population, industrialization stage, your territory size, u will never experience such development process happening in a developing nation.


3. According to above, u r really the so called "CHINI EXPERT"?
 
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winton

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I think you are misinformed, and are misinforming everyone else. Here is the reality:





Source: Gridlock as China begins its 'Golden Week' holidays - Telegraph
Seems like grid lock around a toll collection point. happen to me last time I was there. Looks to me like china needs more infrastructure not less as the pierre the frenchman would have you believe.

With a population of 1.2 billion, and only have a few kilometers of road when nixon visited, how can china ever have enough roads. Just not credible you guys.
 

Armand2REP

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1. Investing Highway is still the most profit business in China, even higher than Chinese famous liqueur industry, if you check the most famous Chinese liqueur Moutai, its profit in 2011 is 90%, but the Chongqing Highway Group gained 91%!, according the the financial report from Shanghai Stock Market.
Is that why Chinese highways are nearly as bankrupt as Chinese Rail Roads ($400 billion)?

Don't forget they cook the books...

Provincial government highway companies have tried to placate disgruntled investors with a little creative accounting and a lot of credit promises... Many highway companies are heavily in debt, and some have been surviving on local government subsidies alone.

Debt Potholes for Highway Financing Platforms -

2. Built good infrastructures 5-10 yrs ahead is normal in China, that's why the middle and west of China would smoothly adopt the industrial transition from coastal cites on manufacture in labor intensive field. That's way China won't lose the advantage on labor cost competing other nations like Vietnam and India.
That is why you have ghost cities, ghost malls, ghost airports, ghost industrial parks, ghost highways... Chinese economy is one big ghost! :lol:

That's why as a French, a empty road (in fact it's not) might not understandable, about for Chinese that's quite reasonable, since according to your nations' population, industrialization stage, your territory size, u will never experience such development process happening in a developing nation.
It is fine if you grow into it, but it looks like that growth has stopped and massive overcapacity exists. By the time you fill it up, it will already be crumbled to dust.


3. According to above, u r really the so called "CHINI EXPERT"?
I know it! :thumb:
 

huaxia rox

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i dont even know why people still tend to compare roads in india and prc........the 2 countries develop in different ways....

in prc infrastrture investment like road building is paramount to our economy and social development........imho how important decent roads can be for citicens in specific city doesnt need to be further pointed out coz we all have healthy brain and what i wanna add is economically speaking chinese road building got some aspects that need to be changed.....

1 road toll should be further reduced......becoz a road or a highway itself should be like school or uni which just needs investment poured in and no 1 should expect things like they can create wealth just by themselves.......when enough decent roads in place the economy will grow so the gov can gain a lot and so the investment on infrastrture will pay off in this way..........

2 when u building roads.....u need steal u need concrete u need a lot of raw materals thats why building roads means u r adding heaps in economy......all the related companies and industries and factories will benifit from the buildups........its the govs duty to make all this happen........

3 so what drivers need to pay is the fee that can maintain the roads charged using the method of adding a bit in oil fee.........and all people should enjoy is no highway toll at all....
 

blank_quest

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Look at the Cost of Solar Power Panels. China is losing $3 for every sale on $1 of Solar Panel. :D .. t0o much loss to the already overproducing Market. Find it out its in the news. Making something Cheap is not always good!
 

rockdog

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Is that why Chinese highways are nearly as bankrupt as Chinese Rail Roads ($400 billion)?
1. If you mention the number, please provide the link and source,thx!

2. No government can use current fiscal power to afford massive infrastructure development especially the transportation system (road network, railway system, urban subway), debt and even the heavy debt is understandable, if the government don't lose the credibility (That's why we need banking system), i think China's government is not as bad as Greece.

3. Talking about bankruptcy, u made me recall the situation in EU and even France... BTW, how's France's debt comparing your yearly GDP?



Don't forget they cook the books...
Cook the book for let people know the Chongqing Highway Group earning 91% profit per year? What the purpose? More tax and more criticism and more Fee Reduction from public?
What a logic!




That is why you have ghost cities, ghost malls, ghost airports, ghost industrial parks, ghost highways... Chinese economy is one big ghost! :lol:.

It is fine if you grow into it, but it looks like that growth has stopped and massive overcapacity exists. By the time you fill it up, it will already be crumbled to dust.
Not all the investment are profitable and bubble is allowed under most economic activities. If no such pre-built things, how long they should prepare the manufacture transition from coastal line cities?

Plus in the long run, the urbanization will bring 400million more people from rural area into urban area, industrial parks, highways, ariports will be useful.

This transition is happening all the time. This national holiday, i went to a small town with 300,000 population call Zaoyang City in middle China, 3 yrs ago they have " ghost malls, ghost airports, ghost industrial parks, ghost highways" (in fact now, just not fully protifable) but now the economy is booming here, since lots of factories moved from coastal to here.
So local youngster don't need to go out but still would earn around 400-500USD in hometown.

As i said, you background made you can't understand this process, please use wider scope to understand what happening in China.


I know it! :thumb:
Yes, i confirm it ^_^
 
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rockdog

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The toll factor

Chinese motorways: The toll factor | The Economist

CHINA'S longest-ever officially arranged holiday is now over. The grumbling is just getting started. The official media are awash with articles complaining that the only extended vacations that most people enjoy are "golden week" public holidays. The result is huge pressure on transport and tourist facilities during those designated periods. For many, annoyance over congestion and price-gouging undermines, if not outweighs, the benefits of getting paid time-off.

The unprecedented length of this year's early-October holiday (eight consecutive work-free days instead of the usual seven) if anything exacerbated the problem. It was caused by the compression of two holidays into one: the mid-autumn festival, which falls on a variable date in September according to the lunar calendar, and the National Day holiday, which begins on October 1st. Another unprecedented factor was also at play this time: a decision to abolish motorway tolls for cars during the holiday period. Chinese motorways being among the world's most expensive to use, this was a big gift to drivers.

Chinese media played up the impact of this confluence of tourism-inducing circumstances, which in northern China coincided with a rare time of year when the weather is often both sunny as well as pleasantly cool. Reports spoke of exponential increases in road use compared with normal days. The Ministry of Transport said on its website (here, in Chinese) that there were 38.2% more vehicle journeys on toll roads during this year's golden week than there were in the same period last year. Highways were clogged with traffic jams. Many reports (such as this one by China's state-television network, CNTV) said the waiving of tolls played a part.

But how much was it to blame? Little hard evidence is yet available. Motorway traffic soared during the holiday, but it had in previous years too. Expressway jams are common at the beginning and end of "golden weeks" (as suggested by this report last year by Xinhua, a government news agency). And usage of other forms of transport rose this year too. The railway system handled 13.4% more passengers than it did during last year's October break (see the ministry of railways' website, in Chinese). Trips by ferry on the Yangzi River increased 26.2% (according to the ministry of transport's website, in Chinese). The number of air passengers rose by 27% (ministry of transport, in Chinese), in spite of widespread complaints about high ticket-prices during the holiday.

The government certainly did not help by waiving the toll while keeping in place the requirement that a driver pick up an electronic card at his first toll station on entering a motorway, in order to hand it over at the next. In a bid to ease jams the authorities eventually decided to waive this obligation too, beginning on the fifth day of the holiday (see this report by Xinhua). Sure enough, traffic at the end of the holiday was far less congested than it was at the beginning. In Beijing, a city used to jams, this came as "a surprise to many", said the Global Times, a newspaper based there.

Some doubts about the toll waiver's impact have been aired in the Chinese press. Fu Weigang of the Shanghai Institute of Finance and Law wrote in the Oriental Morning Post, a local newspaper (here, in Chinese), that the number of cars in use had risen by 7.5% in the first six months of this year. This growth, he said, had to account for at least part of the road-use surge during the holiday. And as a transport-industry association in Guangdong province pointed out (in a local Chinese newspaper, the Yangcheng Evening News), expressway tolls are a relatively small consideration for road users during the holiday, compared with prices of hotels and tourist attractions. Your correspondent met a Beijing couple a few days before the holiday at an expressway service station hundreds of kilometres west of the capital. They had driven there to see the sights of the Gobi desert in the belief that, despite the tolls, it would be cheaper to travel before the holiday, when hotel and other prices would shoot up.

It is hard to reconcile road-use statistics from the October holiday with another set of figures that have received much attention in the Chinese press. Xinhua reported that the number of deaths in traffic accidents during the golden week was 794. This was an astonishing 46.4% lower than in the same period last year.

There might, however, be a plausible explanation for this (other than the highly implausible one that Chinese drivers are on much better form). This study published last year by the World Health Organisation says that figures for road deaths in China as supplied by the police (Xinhua's source for the golden-week casualties) are considerably lower than data compiled by the ministry of health. Between 2002 and 2007, it says, the ministry's figures were nearly twice as high as those given by the police. The report says the inconsistency strongly suggests that a decline in road-traffic mortality reported by the police in recent years "may not be genuine". Road users in China would readily agree with that.
 

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