Russia - Crisis in Chechnya

123Sunny

Regular Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2009
Messages
126
Likes
0
Policeman killed in Chechnya bomb blast
10 october 2009

A bomb attack in the Russian province of Chechnya last night has left one policeman dead and 14 other people injured.

The device was detonated by remote control as a crowd of policemen and civilians were gathering at the scene of a first explosion in the Chechen capital Grozny.

Chechnya’s Kremlin-backed authorities said earlier this year that they were close to eliminating Islamist and other militants. But recent attacks there and in the neighbouring republics of Dagestan and Ingushetia have raised fears that the volatile North Caucasus could descend into open civil war.



Source: Euronews
 

Blackwater

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
21,158
Likes
12,159
Chechen warlord Doku Umarov claims Moscow airport bomb

One of Russia's most wanted men, Chechen warlord Doku Umarov, has said he ordered the deadly bomb attack last month on a Moscow airport.

The suicide attack on the arrivals area of Domodedovo international airport on 24 January left 36 people dead and 180 injured.

In a video posted online, Mr Umarov said the attack was a response to "Russian crimes in the Caucasus".

Similar suicide attacks would continue, he added, speaking in Russian.

Mr Umarov is leader of the "Caucasus Emirate", an Islamist militant group spanning the North Caucasus, and is one of the few prominent Chechen rebels still active, having served as security minister in the Chechen separatist government from 1996-99.

He has also claimed the March 2010 suicide bombings on the Moscow Metro in which 39 people died, and is said to have ordered the November 2009 bombing of a train from Moscow to St Petersburg that left 26 dead.

'On my orders'

The video which appeared on the Kavkaz Tsentr website is dated 24 January, the day of the attack.


Many who survived the blast were badly injured Appearing alone, dressed in combat fatigues, Mr Umarov speaks to the camera: "This special operation was carried out on my orders and, God willing, special operations like it will continue to be carried out."

He goes on to argue that Muslims are under attack all over the world, talking at length about the situation in Sudan, and condemns "Zionist and Christian regimes led by Israel and America".

Mr Umarov says that he and his fighters "are waging jihad in the Caucasus today to establish the word of Allah", and there are "hundreds more brothers" ready to sacrifice themselves to that end, in the fight with Russia's "racist regime".

Promising "regular, deeper and more aggressive operations", he says he wishes that so much blood did not have to be spilt for Russia to "leave the Caucasus".

Russian investigators say the suicide bomber who struck at Domodedovo Airport was a 20-year-old man from the North Caucasus.

At least seven foreigners were killed in the bombing at the airport - the busiest serving the Russian capital. The arrivals hall was full of people as several international flights had just landed.

Those killed included one person each from Britain, Germany, Austria, Ukraine, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. At least 16 Russians were also among the dead.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev sacked several officials - said to include a regional transport chief and a Moscow police deputy head - after the bombing, blaming them for poor security


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-12388681
 

Blackwater

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
21,158
Likes
12,159
According to Zahil Insaan Hamid. Chechens are trained by pak army.:peace::peace::rotfl:
 

JBH22

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2010
Messages
3,911
Likes
3,287

Chechen warlord looks much better like that wait Doku you'll soon be dispatched to your 72virgins


According to Zahil Insaan Hamid. Chechens are trained by pak army.:peace::peace::rotfl:
Zahil Hamid has no idea of what he barks indeed he sells khawabi pulao to Purists,the most idiotic thing he ever said was to develop power projection to strike India upto Andaman Islands but that donkey forgot that it takes lot of money to develop such capabilities.
 

Tshering22

Sikkimese Saber
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2010
Messages
4,777
Likes
4,080
Country flag

Chechen warlord looks much better like that wait Doku you'll soon be dispatched to your 72virgins

Zahil Hamid has no idea of what he barks indeed he sells khawabi pulao to Purists,the most idiotic thing he ever said was to develop power projection to strike India upto Andaman Islands but that donkey forgot that it takes lot of money to develop such capabilities.
Andaman Islands!? When did he say that?!!:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Can you tell me the episode's name from Brasstacks? I would love to hear it.
 

fateh71

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Messages
106
Likes
18
Doku's profile from BBC

Doku Umarov is the Chechen separatist warlord most closely linked to recent deadly attacks on Russia.

He has said he ordered the Moscow airport bombing on 24 January 2011, which left 36 people dead and 180 injured, and the March 2010 suicide bombings on the city's Metro, in which 39 people died.

Mr Umarov is also said to have ordered the November 2009 bombing of a train from Moscow to St Petersburg that claimed 26 lives.

He is one of Russia's most wanted rebels, and the self-styled Emir of the Caucasus Emirate.

Security minister

Mr Umarov is considered the leader of the Islamist insurgency in the North Caucasus.

He has spear-headed several high-profile rebel raids, and fought in both wars against Russia since 1994.

He also served as Chechnya's security minister during its short-lived independence between 1996 and 1999.

He became the commander of the "south-western front" of the rebel armed forces in 2002, and is believed to have about 1,000 fighters under his command.

Mr Umarov is said to have played a key role in organising an attack in the neighbouring republic of Ingushetia in June 2004, in which several dozen people, including the acting Ingush interior minister, were killed.

He has also been accused by Russian security forces of leading the 2004 school siege in Beslan, which resulted in more than 300 deaths. The allegation has never been substantiated, although hostages have said he was the only attacker not to wear a mask.

In Chechnya, he is suspected of being behind a string of kidnappings for ransom, and is said by officials to have been involved in killing Chechens who were co-operating with the pro-Kremlin government.

In a video statement in March last year, Mr Umarov called the Moscow Metro bombings "a legitimate act of revenge for the continued assassinations of civilians in the Caucasus".

"I told you, the Russians, that now you only see the war on your TV screens, and you don't respond to the crimes of the FSB [security agency] bandits and to the crimes of [Prime Minister Vladimir] Putin himself."

'Enemies of Muslims'

Mr Umarov rose up the Chechen rebel hierarchy after Russian forces killed his predecessor, Khalim Saydullayev, in 2006 and rebel leader Aslan Maskhadov in 2005.

Shamil Basayev, the mastermind of the Beslan siege, also died in 2006.

In his first public statement shortly afterwards, Mr Umarov vowed to step up attacks against Russian police and military targets.

Then, in October 2007, a proclamation was issued naming him the Emir of the new "Caucasus Emirate" - a purported Islamic state spanning several republics in the Russian North Caucasus.

Mr Umarov described Western countries as the enemies of all Muslims, and announced his intention to install Sharia law across the region.

It was the first time a Chechen leader had echoed al-Qaeda's rhetoric, and he explicitly linked his movement to international Islamist groups.

Analysts said the move reflected the growing influence of non-Chechen members on the republic's militants, and the transformation of the movement's focus from separatism to fundamentalism.

Several members of the Chechen government-in-exile resisted the development. Akhmed Zakayev swiftly declared himself the exiled government's prime minister and called the radicalisation of the movement a "personal tragedy".

Several children

Mr Umarov was born in 1964 in the southern Chechen village of Kharshenoi, and earned an engineering degree from the local university.

He is married with at least six children. Two of his brothers, Issa and Mussa, have been killed in combat.

The fate of his father, Hamad, captured several times by Russian forces, is unknown. His wife and child were also taken hostage, but were released in 2005 following media pressure.

Like most Chechen rebel commanders, Mr Umarov has been declared dead on several occasions by the Russian security services.

In the statement that followed the Moscow Metro bombings, he purportedly said: "To anybody who calls me a terrorist, I will just laugh in their face, be they politicians or journalists."
 

SHASH2K2

New Member
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
5,711
Likes
725
Russian colonel who killed Chechen girl is shot dead



A Russian colonel who was jailed for murdering a Chechen teenager has been shot dead in central Moscow.

Yuri Budanov was killed on Friday by an unidentified gunman on Komsomolsky Prospekt, a busy avenue in the capital, state prosecutors said.

In 2003 a court upheld his 10-year jail sentence for strangling an 18-year-old girl in war-torn Chechnya in 2000.

But he was released early from jail in January 2009 - a move that angered human rights activists.

Russian media say the gunman, wearing a blue jacket and hood, attacked Budanov at about 1230 (0830 GMT), shooting him six times with a pistol, then fled by car.

The Mitsubishi Lancer getaway car was later found abandoned and on fire, the reports said. A pistol and silencer were found inside.

High-profile case

Kungayeva's mother Roza Bashayeva moved to a refugee camp in Ingushetia
The Budanov trial was big news in Russia, where very few officers have been prosecuted over abuses committed during Russia's two campaigns against Chechen separatist rebels.

He was the only senior officer to be jailed for crimes committed in Chechnya.

He was found guilty of the kidnapping and strangling of Elza Kungayeva in 2000. An allegation that he had also raped her was dropped.

The murder provoked outrage in Chechnya, where many civilians have died at the hands of Russian forces and the local pro-Moscow militia, during the long war against rebels.

At his re-trial in 2003 Budanov accused Russian media of having swayed the judge, insisting that he was "a Russian soldier who defended his country for the past 20 years".

Budanov was acquitted at his first trial in December 2002, when the court accepted his plea that he had been temporarily insane at the time of the killing.

But the Russian supreme court ordered a re-trial, where he was found to have been of sound mind at the time. He was found guilty and stripped of his rank and the Order of Courage, which he had won in breakaway Chechnya.

Budanov told the court he believed that Kungayeva was a Chechen sniper and that a fit of rage had come over him as he interrogated her.

The lawyer representing Kungayeva's family, Stanislav Markelov, was shot dead in Moscow in January 2009, along with a journalist, Anastasia Baburova, who was with him at the time.

Last month a court in Moscow sentenced a Russian nationalist to life imprisonment for the double murder. His partner was also jailed.
 

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,591
Country flag
It was a mistake to let him go. Russian judicial system is two faced. Until they reform it the country will never be great.
 

Kunal Biswas

Member of the Year 2011
Ambassador
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
31,123
Likes
40,643
He was a Russian Patriot and a good commander, His was very much respected in Russian army and outside, That was primary reason..

Though their is a saying in our country " Jaysi karni wasi varni "
 

Someoneforyou

Regular Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
990
Likes
51
4 soldiers killed, 7 wounded in Russia's Caucasus

4 soldiers killed, 7 wounded in Russia's Caucasus
Russia - 16 August 2011

ROSTIOV-ON-DON: The Russian Interior Ministry says four servicemen have been killed and seven wounded by rebels in a restive region in Russia's North Caucasus.

Madina Khadziyeva, a spokeswoman for the ministry's branch in the province of Ingushetia, said that militants ambushed an Interior Ministry convoy today in the region's mountain forests close to the administrative border with Chechnya. She said the attack occurred near the village of Dattykh, but gave no further details.

An Islamic insurgency spread across North Caucasus after two separatists wars in Chechnya. While Chechnya itself has become more stable in recent years under the steely grip of a Moscow-backed strongman, neighboring provinces have seen an increase in attacks on police and other authorities.

Ingushetia recently had been less volatile than some of the neighbouring regions, so the casualty toll in Monday's attack was unusually high.



Source: Associated Press
 

pmaitra

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
33,267
Likes
19,494
Chechnya rebel clash with Russian troops 'kills seven'

Chechnya rebel clash with Russian troops 'kills seven'


9 January 2012 Last updated at 07:32 ET | BBC News

Four Russian security personnel and at least three Islamist militants have been killed in clashes in Chechnya, says Russia's Interior Ministry.


The fighting happened as Russian forces confronted the rebels at a camp in heavily forested mountains, officials say.


The militants had reportedly laid trip wires and mines around their hideout, which were buried under deep snow.


Chechnya's long-running insurgency has recently spread to neighbouring areas.


The fighting began on Sunday when a Russian security patrol came across the militants in the south of Chechnya, officials say.


"During the pursuit of a bandit group in wooded mountainous terrain in Chechnya's Vedenskiy District, three bandits were destroyed," an unnamed security source told Russia's Interfax news agency.


"Preliminary indications are that the militants were able to fortify their so-called camp and set up a large number of trip wire mines around it," the source told Interfax.


"It was these mines that killed the law-enforcers."


Militant hideout


In addition to those who died, 16 other Russian servicemen were injured, a Russian Interior Ministry statement said.


Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov said on Sunday that the Russian operation was close to achieving its objectives.


"We have practically found their den and we are now doing everything we can to destroy them in their den," his government's website quoted him as saying.


The Russian authorities have been fighting insurgents in the North Caucasus region since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.


Chechen separatists and Russian forces waged two wars in the 1990s.


Since the second of those wars ended in 2000, the insurgents have increasingly been Islamists and the unrest has spread to other Russian republics in the region, especially Dagestan.

Source: BBC News - Chechnya rebel clash with Russian troops 'kills seven'
 

asianobserve

Senior Member
Joined
May 5, 2011
Messages
10,454
Likes
5,406
Country flag
This whole thing is not yet finished? I thought Putin smashed these midgets? Putin would even should his abs in Russian TV as proof... :rofl:
 

Tshering22

Sikkimese Saber
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2010
Messages
4,777
Likes
4,080
Country flag
So some filth still remains eh? Putin has one golden chance to come back to power if he can snuff these scum out once and for all. Otherwise, he simply stands no chance considering the recent reactions Russians gave.
 

HeinzGud

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2011
Messages
2,399
Likes
618
Country flag
So some filth still remains eh? Putin has one golden chance to come back to power if he can snuff these scum out once and for all. Otherwise, he simply stands no chance considering the recent reactions Russians gave.
What dude when Sri Lanka doing it it's genocide and Russia doing it it's OK! It's just like your dreamy claim of temple destroying incident!
 

pmaitra

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
33,267
Likes
19,494
Russia's New Chechnya Problem

Russia's New Chechnya Problem

February 22, 2012 | 1349 GMT | STRATFOR


YANA LAPIKOVA/AFP/Getty Images
Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (L) and Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov in Moscow on Dec. 13, 2011


Summary

The political clan system that Russian leader Vladimir Putin spent a decade building has fallen apart. Amid the disarray, Chechnya has been left without a manager in the Kremlin. Vladislav Surkov -- himself half-Chechen -- had served as Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov's handler, but Surkov has been demoted and Kadyrov has indicated that he could step down as president. This jeopardizes Chechnya's stability at an inconvenient time for Putin, who will have to work with numerous political players to maintain calm in the historically restive region.

Analysis

With the Kremlin's internal political system in disarray, many important Russian projects are being reassessed. No strong Kremlin figure, however, has been placed in charge of handling the volatile region of Chechnya. This puts pressure on the political and social stability of a previously war-torn region -- and places its security situation in doubt -- at a time when the Kremlin has other problems to address.

Russian leader Vladimir Putin spent a decade designing an intricate political system inside the Kremlin that divides responsibilities and strategic sectors between two key clans: the siloviki and the civiliki. This system was meant to help Putin retain control while balancing the pre-eminent need to gear policy toward national security with the need to implement liberal reforms in certain economic sectors. However, over the past year, policy changes and Kremlin infighting have torn the system apart and left the two clans in ruins.

While the security-focused siloviki have mostly reconsolidated, the top figures in the economy- and society-focused civiliki have either left the Kremlin or been sidelined. This has jeopardized the large projects and portfolios overseen by the civiliki. The Kremlin is already reassessing civiliki-led economic plans for modernization and privatization, and rumors in Moscow indicate that civiliki-created youth groups, such as the controversial Nashi, could be disbanded or restructured. Chechnya is one of the more critical portfolios the civiliki oversaw. That portfolio is now in question because Vladislav Surkov, the Kremlin figure who oversaw the region's social policies and president, lost a great deal of influence within the Russian government and was demoted.

Surkov's Role

After two major wars in the region in the past two decades, administering policy concerning Chechnya is a fraught endeavor. When Russia declared an end to the Second Chechen War in 2009, the Kremlin clans split responsibilities for the region. The siloviki oversaw the Russian military's role in the region and the operation of the oil sector under Rosneft, but the civiliki's role of overseeing the region's political and social policies has proved far more important. Responsibility for this role fell to Surkov, former deputy chief of the presidential administration. Surkov is one of Putin's most valued advisers in the Kremlin and is considered by many as one of the most powerful men in the country. Surkov became the most powerful Kremlin figure connected with Chechnya -- a role which would seem a better fit for someone with a position in security -- because he is half-Chechen and has demonstrated an aptitude for complex solutions to complicated problems.

Moscow was able to curtail the Chechen insurgency toward the end of the Second Chechen War by shifting strategies in two main ways. First, Russia stopped using conventional Russian troops against the insurgents. In their place, Moscow created a Chechen fighting force composed of former militants and gave them Russian military counterinsurgency training and a country for which to fight. This hybrid force could then operate alongside the Russian military while using more unconventional tactics to combat the insurgency. Second, Russia elevated two families -- who previously had fought against Russia in Chechnya -- into positions directing the region's security and politics. The Yamadayev family worked within Chechnya's various security forces, while the Kadyrovs took over the presidency and political structures. Over the years, many of the Yamadayev brothers were killed, leaving Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov to consolidate power in both areas, including overseeing the 40,000-strong Chechen forces. Surkov has protected Kadyrov's power in the region.

Although Russia's strategy shifts quashed any meaningful insurgency in Chechnya, many in Moscow -- particularly among the siloviki -- worry about the existence of a large, well-trained Chechen fighting force. Some are also concerned that this force is primarily under the command of Kadyrov, whose Kremlin handler (Surkov) reportedly has changed political loyalties several times.

A Post-Surkov Chechnya?

Besides Chechnya, Surkov oversaw the Kremlin's social and political policies. As Surkov himself has admitted, his leadership in this regard failed, leading to mass protests across the country. It became clear in December 2011 that Surkov would be ejected from power; he even offered his resignation, saying that he did not understand the shifting political mood in Russia. Just before he was to step down, however, Surkov traveled to Chechnya to meet with Kadyrov -- a reminder of his connection to the volatile region. Stratfor sources in Moscow say that this was when Putin decided to demote Surkov rather than remove him from the Kremlin entirely. Surkov's loss of title is not the issue; the problem is that he has essentially lost power over groups in the Kremlin, with many reports indicating that he is now being shunned politically. Surkov's influence in Chechnya is his only remaining leverage.

Keeping Surkov in the Kremlin has not completely diffused the threat to Chechnya's current calm. Although Kadyrov's benefactor still holds a position in the Kremlin, he is no longer able to protect Kadyrov and preserve his unrestricted power over Chechnya. This means the siloviki could push their interest in divesting power in Grozny -- and over the structure of Chechen forces -- from a single person.

Since Surkov's fall from power, Kadyrov has begun to indicate that he could eventually step down as president. Currently no real alternative to Kadyrov's rule in Chechnya exists, nor is there any guarantee that Chechen forces would be loyal to any other leader. Chechnya is not ripe for a peaceful transition of power, so Putin will have to ensure that Kadyrov and Surkov feel secure enough to prevent any break from the current peace. For fear of a larger destabilization in Chechnya in the future, Putin will restrain those in the Kremlin who want to change the status quo.

Source: Russia's New Chechnya Problem | STRATFOR
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,726
Kremlin would not leave the area unattended since it is a huge problem for Russia and the lid has to be kept on or else it would turn out to be expensive in terms of stability and economics.

So long as there is Russian over-watch on the Pankisi Gorge, much of the problems can be kept under control with a bit of arm twisting Georgia.
 

LurkerBaba

Super Mod
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
7,624
Likes
6,058
Country flag


Putin's Secret War
The bloody Islamic insurgency in Russia's backyard.

...

...


ends drove up to the police checkpoint. With iPads and cell phones held aloft, they began taking photos of the men in uniform.

The Dagestan insurgency began with the spillover of militant activity following Russia's harsh crackdown on neighboring Chechnya in the late 1990s. Although the region is traditionally Sufi, militant Salafi imams have been making inroads in the North Caucasus since the collapse of the Soviet Union. In recent years, the region has been the scene of a vicious cycle of violence and repression: police and special forces have arrested thousands of young Salafists throughout the North Caucasus republics, which in turn has driven more young men -- and increasingly women -- to various jihadi groups that aim to establish an Islamic state encompassing the entire North Caucasus. With thousands of active fighters, the insurgency in Dagestan is now reportedly the largest in the Caucasus.

In Makhachkala, frustration and rage have been growing over the 17 people abducted, presumably by authorities, since the beginning of this year. Dagestan, always one spark away from fire, is heating up -- a bad sign in this region, where 254 Russian police officers died in insurgency-related incidents last year, far more than the number of U.S. casualties in Afghanistan.

"Women should be sitting at home cooking soup for men, under sharia law," the police officers sarcastically shouted at the angry crowd. The comment was the last straw for Zhanna Ismailova. Two of her five sons had been abducted from their workplaces that month, she said. Men in black uniforms, who introduced themselves as members of the Federal Security Service (FSB) took them in on suspicion of militant activity. One of her sons, Arslan, 34, had been released after two days and has gone into hiding. Taking out her cell phone, Ismailova showed me pictures of her son's wounds, including pictures of his feet, burned by what she said were electric shocks. The FSB men questioned Arslan about twin suicide attacks on May 3 that killed 13 and injured more than 100 people in Makhachkala. Ismailova's youngest son, Rashid, is still missing. "This brutality and Moscow's idiotic politics is the reason for the war," Ismailova said.

At one point, she slipped past guards and ran into the building, yelling: "Show me immediately the cells where you beat our children!" Outside, hundreds of her supporters, now face to face with a unit of special-forces troops in black balaclavas, were raising their hands in the air and chanting: "God is Great! God is Great!"

To most Russians, the scene would probably look more like Syria or Libya than their own country. State television rarely broadcasts images or even official comments about the increasing human rights abuses by the FSB or police in Dagestan. It's a part of Russia that newly returned President Vladimir Putin does not want to talk about now. Meanwhile, Dagestan is quietly turning from police action to the kind of shooting war against Islamic insurgents that Putin waged with brutal efficiency in Chechnya at the beginning of his first presidential term.
....

....

Gannushkina has been focusing on the North Caucuses for years, calling and Skyping associates in the region day and night. A member of ex-President Dmitry Medvedev's human rights council, she reported to the Kremlin for the past three years about conditions in the Caucuses. She got little reaction to her increasingly dire warnings while Medvedev was in charge, but with Putin back in his presidential seat, Gannushkina quit the council along with other highly respected human rights defenders.

The night before the angry gathering outside the Kirovsky police station, Gannushkina, members of the human rights NGO Memorial, and a parliamentary committee on constitutional law and civil society stayed up all night in Moscow, trying to save the lives of two young men, three women, and two babies in a house in Makhachkala surrounded by federal forces. The inhabitants of the house were suspected of participating in the Islamist underground. Gannushkina and her team tried for hours to convince the commander of the operation to let the women and children out and allow the men to surrender. But in the end, federal forces raided the house, killing one of the men, who was indeed armed; keeping the three women in custody for a day; and arresting and beating the other man at Kirovsky station. It was this arrest that precipitated the demonstration at the station the next day.

The situation at the station quickly spiraled out of control. Soon enough, blood was on the pavement. Several Salafi men grabbed this reporter's notebook and camera, but returned them. A reporter for a web news portal went down in a scrum of fists, was pulled out and rescued by police, and later flew to Moscow to receive treatment for shock and bruises. The police started making arrests. The crowd threw chunks of pavement, hitting one policeman in the forehead, leaving a bloody gash. Before the crowd dispersed, 11 more people were in cells in Kirovsky station.

It was just another day in the violent conflict that most Russians aren't even aware is taking place within their own country.
Putin's Secret War - By Anna Nemtsova | Foreign Policy
 

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top