Pakistan to America: What have you done for us lately?

Vikramaditya

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Pak to US: Terror bill worth $35 billion, nuke deal

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/us/Pak-to-US-Terror-bill-worth-35-billion-nuke-deal/articleshow/5706539.cms

WASHINGTON: Pakistan is coming up with a bill of $ 35 billion for its efforts in the war on terror and a wish-list that includes a nuclear deal similar to the US-India agreement as it prepares to engage Washington this coming week in what officials from both sides say is the most comprehensive dialogue in their bilateral history.

Turning the US mantra that Pakistan should "do more" in the war on terror, Pakistani officials, in an aggressive turnaround, have said Pakistan has done enough and it is now the United States turn to do more, as they set off to Washington for talks on the heels of what they claim is unprecedented success against the Taliban.

Pakistan has "captured" nearly half the top Taliban leadership, including the organisation's No.2 Mullah Baradar, in recent weeks in the run-up to the talks. Although U.N and Afghan officials accuse the Pakistanis, who were hosting the Taliban leadership, took them in to sabotage peace talks being held outside Islamabad's patronage, U.S officials said on Friday that they were "gratified" by the arrests.

"We are extremely gratified... he is where he belongs," the Obama administration's Af-Pak envoy Richard Holbrooke said about Baradar's arrest by Pakistan as he previewed the upcoming talks with reporters at the State Department on Friday, adding, "And many other people have been picked up or eliminated, and this is putting much more pressure on the Taliban. And this is a good thing for the simplest of reasons: It is good for the military efforts that are underway in Afghanistan."

Holbrooke also endorsed a central role for the Pakistani military at the talks, asking "how can you have a strategic dialogue without including the military?" In a move that has caused some disquiet in Pakistan itself, the country's army chief Pervez Ashfaq Kiyani and spy chief Ahmed Shuja Pasha are members of the delegation, ostensibly led by Pakistan's foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi. Kiyani is said to have set the agenda for the talks in preparatory meetings in Pakistan.

"If we have a strategic dialogue in our country, we're going to include the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff or some other representative. So we are very pleased that General Kayani is part of this delegation. We think that it's one country, one government, one team. It was their decision and we welcomed it," Holbrooke said. Washington in recent weeks has noticeably cooled down its criticism of the over-arching role played by the Pakistan military in the country's affairs.

Pakistan's wish-list for the Obama administration includes not only speeding up disbursements in bilateral aid under the Kerry-Lugar package and Coalition Support Funds, both of which are audited for more precise use and claim, but enhanced support for its economy, particularly in the energy sector. Vast swathes of the country are now under 8 to 12 hour power cuts and Islamabad is presenting this as one reason why Washington should offer a civilian nuclear deal to Pakistan similar to the US-India deal, although experts say Pakistan has no capacity to absorb or implement such an agreement even if it were to pass international scrutiny.

US officials remain non-committal about the deal. "We have a very broad and complex agenda in these talks... and we're going to listen carefully to whatever the Pakistanis say," Holbrooke said cautiously when asked about a possible nuclear deal. In fact, no one in Washington takes Pakistan $ 35 billion claim as its total cost in the war on terror arrived at during internal deliberations in Islamabad last week, seriously.

But Holbrooke held out the prospect of enhanced aid in other areas and sectors, promising a few surprise announcements. "This is not a photo op, although you will have an opportunity to take a photo. This is an intense, serious dialogue bilaterally between the US. and Pakistan," he said in a hurried briefing at the state department that followed a White House meeting of principals where, Holbrooke said, -- "almost every senior person in the United States foreign policy community was in the room" to discuss US policy for the region.

Pakistan too is striving to broad-base its ties with the US on the same lines as India's expansive engagement, covering sector beyond security. Indicative of the broad agenda for the March 24 talks, the Pakistani delegation led by Foreign Miniser Qureshi includes Minister of Defense Mukhtar Ahmad, Finance Minister nominee Abdul Shaikh, Advisor to the Prime Minister on Social Issues Wazir Ali; Advisor to the Prime Minister on Agriculture and Water Majidullah; the Chief of Staff of the Army General Kayani and his delegation of military advisors; Ambassador Hussain Haqqani; Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir; and Secretaries of Information Technology, Water and Power, Finance, Agriculture, Defense, among others.

The US delegation, led by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton includes Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mullen, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Deputy Secretary of State Jack Lew, Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Neal Wolin, National Security Council Senior Director David Lipton, Deputy U.S. Trade Representative Marantis, the Administrator of USAID Raj Shah, myself, Ambassador Anne Patterson and Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy Judith McHale, Under Secretary of Defense Michele Flournoy and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense David Sydney, among others.
 

ajtr

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Anyway, the thing Ms. Nirupama Subramanian and others don't realize is that what keeps India and Pakistan apart, despite supposedly common DNA, culture, cuisine, language, music, and geography, is a very different conception of politics - the formal and informal arrangements that are used to settle public issues among a huge set of competing interests. Ms.Nirupama Subramanian and others like her would respond, what is the difference, politics on both sides is equally corrupt. And they'd be utterly missing the point. Nadeem Paracha touches on some key points in his manifesto of the young, urban, middle-class Pakistani. How many points of that manifesto mirror the manifesto of the young, urban, middle-class Indian? Where is the common ground?So both Nirupama Subramanian article and Nadeem Paracha blog must be read together to know where the indo-pak are different.



Khuda Hafiz Pakistan


Nirupama Subramanian
People on both sides must take charge of peace-making.
The goodwill experienced in daily interactions with ordinary Pakistanis was overwhelming and more powerful than anything else

The political class on both sides has specialised in hyping the emotional in India-Pakistan relations over the rational

“There is a Pakistani in every Indian; and an Indian in every Pakistani,” President Asif Ali Zardari famously said two years ago. Those words rang in my head with new resonance as I packed my bags and left Pakistan recently after a nearly four-year-long assignment as this newspaper's Islamabad-based correspondent.

It should have been easy to leave a country that is by word and deed hostile to India, and where the state machinery treats every Indian as a “RAW agent”, spending considerable human and material resources on the surveillance of the only two Indian journalists — from The Hindu and Press Trust India — that are permitted to be based there.

Yet, saying goodbye to Pakistan was much more difficult than I imagined. Like other Indians who have experienced Pakistan first-hand, I gained a vast number of friends for life and multitudes of warm memories. Against this reality, it seems absurdly unbelievable that these two countries are not even talking properly to each other, that I cannot visit my Pakistani friends easily, that they cannot come and see me. Even texting, one of the easiest and cost-efficient ways of keeping in touch these days, is not possible — or erratic, at best — between India and Pakistan.

Huge distance

Walking across the Wagah border into India took me less than five minutes. But as I turned at the gates to wave to a Pakistani friend who had come to see me off, the distance between the two countries seemed huge and daunting.

At home, family and friends greeted me with relief, and asked me how I had managed to survive four years in “a country of terrorists.” Despite the close geographical proximity of the two countries, and the reams written and spoken in India about Pakistan, there seemed little patience for or understanding of the complexities of, an important neighbouring country, the shades of political, social and religious opinion among Pakistanis on such issues as terrorism and extremism.

There is similarly much in the way Pakistanis react to India that can send even the mildest Indian's blood pressure rising. For instance, even well-educated Pakistanis continue to believe that the Mumbai attacks were staged by RAW to defame Pakistan with the ultimate aim of snatching its nuclear weapons or dismembering the country. Young and old alike will assert that India is behind the wave of terrorist attacks in Pakistan because “no Muslim will kill fellow Muslims”, even though they have no explanation for why Shias routinely get killed by Sunni extremists.

I would have heated debates with Pakistanis who consider themselves modern, enlightened, liberal and secular but would suddenly go all Islamic and religious when it came to an issue such as Kashmir, seeming no different from their ultra-conservative compatriots who protest against the clamping down on Islamic militancy in Pakistan as harassment of “brother Muslims.” They could tout jihad in Kashmir as legitimate even while condemning the Taliban who threaten their own modern, liberal lifestyle, despite the knowledge that the distinction between the two kinds of jihad, or the two categories of militants, is at best an illusion.

But at the end of the day, the goodwill I experienced in my daily interactions with ordinary Pakistanis, even during the most heated debates, was overwhelming and more powerful than anything else. Despite the heavy hand of the state in every sphere of life, I found people who were willing to set aside long internalised stereotypes and prejudices about Indians and Hindus to try and understand me and my point of view, and they accepted with good faith that I was trying to do the same. We may not have entirely convinced each other every time but we managed to build little bridges of our own and find our own modus vivendi.

If there is anything I learnt from those personal experiences in Pakistan, it is that these little bridges are the key to peace. And for this reason, peace-making cannot be left to rulers. It is the people on both sides that have to take charge of it. What the people have now is a unique and contradictory chemistry of love and hate, curiosity and suspicion, friendliness and antagonism, admiration and envy, not to speak of nostalgia and convenient memory lapses. Forget about which of these is natural and which deliberately created. What is required for a stable relationship is a rational middle-ground between these emotional extremes.

If we acknowledge that war or even just a simmering long-term enmity is not an option, that middle-ground would be easy to locate. There, on that middle-ground, we need not be the best of friends, but we need not be the worst of enemies either. We can just live as two civilised neighbours.

It is evident that the political leadership of both countries, which includes the military in Pakistan, cannot be entrusted with finding this middle-ground. The political class on both sides has specialised in hyping the emotional in India-Pakistan relations over the rational, finding it a useful instrument for domestic political gain. Blame communally driven politics on the Indian side, and in Pakistan, the tight grip of a military that needs to perpetuate its predominance in national affairs.

Narrow prism of state

Most of the celebrated India-Pakistan people-to-people contact since 2004, including the interaction between the media, film and fashion worlds of the two countries, has tended to be driven by the governments on both sides, or blessed, encouraged or sponsored by the two states in some way. With rare exceptions, such contact has mirrored the official point of view, providing no room for building genuine bridges. No wonder they fell apart so easily in the aftermath of the 2008 Mumbai attacks to a point where goodwill seems almost irretrievable.

But even now, the first thing that Pakistanis and Indians ask each other is: “We eat the same food, speak the same language, we even look the same, so why can't we be friends?” The short answer to that is that we cannot be friends as long as we continue looking at each other through the narrow prism of our respective states. Pakistanis must locate the Indian within themselves, and Indians must discover their inner Pakistani. It would help understand each other better, and free us from state-manipulated attitudes. In our own interests, it is up to us, the people, to find ways to do this. For now, Khuda Hafiz Pakistan.

We shall overrun


The young, urban, middle-class Pakistani’s manifesto:



1. Asif Ali Zardari is the devil incarnate.

2. The Pakistan Army is the saviour.

3. The Taliban are resisting American imperialism.

4. We hate American foreign policy unless it suits us. We are against American imperialism if it means we have to ditch the Taliban as that would be against the aspirations of our founding father, Mohammed Bin Qasim. We will no longer shop at Marks and Spencer because they are somehow connected to Israel. However, that does not mean we will switch off our computers and cell phones whose chip technology has been made possible due to major contributions from Israeli scientists.

5. We don’t want to sell our honour for American money unless it is for our private hospitals, textile exports, NGOs, or for completing degrees at American universities.

6. It’s not just Zardari who is the culprit. It’s also Benazir Bhutto and Zulfikar Ali Bhutto. Fatima Bhutto is fine, though; she is dating George Clooney.

7. It was all milk and honey till Bhutto came along. Damn him for nationalising my father’s 15 mills, seven textile units, and 11 banks! I still remember the good old days when Nani ji, Dada ji and their friends brought hundreds of textile licenses from Gohar Ayub for US $ 200,000 a pop. There was no corruption and no labour unions until this Sindhi feudal and closet Hindu agent named Z.A. Bhutto came along and enforced his Zionist agenda and made all our urban serfs so uppity.

8. We are against feudalism unless the feudals in question do not support the PPP and allow us to rape the ecology of Sindh and the Punjab on our weekend hunting trips. Some crates of mangoes from their farms also help.

9. Some of us feel we know what’s best for the PPP, i.e. to banish Zardari and his kids and ditch the legacies of ZAB and BB. We have never voted for or supported the PPP (actually we never vote all!) but we still feel that we are in a better position to understand the party’s dynamics.

Also, as educated, refined and objective leaders and captains of industry, we are against dynastic politics. However, we are fine with Fatima Bhutto, Hamza Sharif, Solaiman/Essa Khan, Monis Chaudhary as well as the privileged alumni of Karachi Grammar School, Aitchison and Pakistan Military Academy, Kakul, ruling us. Just as long as they are not descended from the Zionist agent Benazir and her corrupt husband, Zardari.

10. Democracy is a deeply flawed system that has destroyed the world. Totalitarian monarchies with entrenched security and bureaucracies are much better and in line with our Arab origins. Please do not compare us to India. We have nothing in common with them except our DNA, culture, cuisine, language, music, and geography.

11. Our ideal form of government is the modern day Caliphate, or, as we like to call it, the rule of technocrats. In this form of government, our posh uncles will pass stern orders in their clipped Oxbridge accents and Italian suits that will be supported by a medieval council of jurists whom we like to call the independent judiciary.

12. Lately, we have been reading some Chomsky, Klein and Zinn (all five articles) and appreciate how these believing Muslims provide us with the intellectual ammo on exposing how the perfidious Jews conspire to rule the world.

13. We are essentially a good people who are suffering because the world wants to take over our nukes and is conspiring to destroy our country. They are using the Taliban, who themselves are essentially good people who are bravely fighting American imperialism.

The Taliban just suffer from bad press, and we know who controls the press abroad. Here, the press is controlled by democratically elected anchors and media analysts who are fighting for justice and against corruption.

14. The Taliban who are killed in the drone attacks are simply pious Muslims who are doing charity work, such as digging canals in arid, mountainous zones – it’s called the Mars project.

Also, the burning of Christian villages by Taliban affiliated and state-sponsored sectarian militias is a figment of the imagination of the liberal fascists. They are doing their best to curb crusaders of truth and justice such as Geo TV. The real problem is Blackwater/Xe, fools.

15. The Taliban are an expression of Pushtoon nationalism as they have done their best to cleanse the United Emirates of Peshawar and FARTA from pagan Pukhtoon influence. The Taliban are a legitimate resistance movement against the occupation of the United Emirates of Peshawar and FARTA by ANP, Shia parachinaris, Sikhs and, of course, female students. The only genuine Pathans are Imran Khan, Hamid Gul, and Zaid Hamid.

16. Sipah Sahaba, Jaish, Lashkar Taiba, Lashkar Jhangvi, Jamaat Islami … who the are they? Figments of the imagination of liberal fascists. We should be more concerned about the Ahmed Rashids, Kamran Shafis, Amir Mirs, Arif Jamals, Najam Sethis, Tarek Fatahs, Irfan Hussains, Pervaiz Hoodbhoys, Fasi Zakas, Ayesha Siddiquas, and Nadeem Parachas.… They are CIA agents.

17. India is stealing our water and is destroying the country via its Sindhi/Balochi/Pushtoon/Gilgiti/Hazara/Hingora/Makrani/Seraiki proxies. Damn this fifth column riff-raff. We brought them the glorious Islamic civilization from the latest Nasim Hejazi novel and look at how uppity they have gotten since. We gave them commerce (Gujrati), language (Urdu), and agriculture (Punjabi) and they still want to maintain their identities and celebrate their vernacular religious practices which our pure Arab background forbids. Feed them to the Taliban.

18. We, the members of civil society, are essentially a liberal lot who are imbued with socialist values. Our ability to engage in massive socialising (through Facebook) makes us socialist in the true sense of the word. Lately, we have also dabbled in Marxism at cafes where we blow off half a month’s average national salary on lattes and cappuccinos whilst we construct our neo- Marxism around the tacit acceptance of the Taliban’s superior Arab cultural identity. We salute Abul Ala Marx, Lenin Bin Laden, and Mulla Mao!

19. These are difficult times for civil society. While the tyrant Zardari is destroying the country with a ‘progressive agenda’ (another Zionist conspiracy) that involves legislation about women’s rights and the enfranchisement and autonomy of minority provinces, our brave and independent judiciary is fighting a Herculean battle to free the champions of our true Arab identity like Hafiz Saeed, Maulana Aziz, and Masood Azhar. These tireless crusaders are fighting our battle against Hindu hegemony in Pakistan. We need to applaud the efforts of the Chief Justice of the Lahore High Court in exposing the Hindus.

20. As Zardari loots and pillages Pakistan via the nefarious use of his handle bar moustache and cheery demeanour, we have to appreciate how our Taliban investment is saving our economy by killing thousands of our citizens and costing billions of dollars in damages and lost investment and trade opportunities. We are a financially and arithmetically gifted segment of society that can expand US $66 million to $1,500 million if it means that we can lynch Zardari (and free Aafia).

21. While our existential adversary India is investing billions of dollars in Afghanistan’s infrastructure and municipal training, we are using our billions to create the ultimate strategic depth in Afghanistan: macho Islamist brutes who will eventually recreate the Islamic State that made Afghanistan the model of peace and prosperity from 1996 till 2001.

In conclusion we would like to part with a speech from one of our greatest representatives, Zen Farman Wamid, which he made at the historic Dillee Kebab House. The topic of this grand speech was, “Today Dillee Kebab House, tomorrow Delhi Fort”:

“Assalamualaikum, my dear and superior Muslim Pakistanis. By the grace of God, I am proud to announce from this wonderful kebab house that we are now ready to invade India. This invasion has taken a lot of planning and effort by my young upwardly mobile comrades and for this we would also like to thank our friends in the electronic media and inspirations such as Yahya Khan and Ziaul Haq.

Dear muscular Muslim boys and petite Muslim girls, I had been planning this invasion for a very long time, even before my blessed birth when I was just a spirit floating over Pakistan – even before Pakistan was made. My spirit swooped down when it saw the great Muhammad Bin Qasim invading Sindh and defeating Hindu scoundrels as well as Mohajir, Sindhi, Balochi and Pakhtun nationalists.

We will vanquish them in the Islamic Emirate Caliphate of Punjab … I mean, Pakistan. Damn those who say that Pakistan was made in 1947. That’s a lie, I tell you. It was made in the seventh century, when Kalashnikov Bin Qasim, Allama F-16 Iqbal, and Inzimamul Haq defeated a million-strong army of that secular tyrant and usurper Raja Bhutto and his side-kick Mohindar Singh Dhoni and announced the creation of the Islamic Caliphate of Punj … I mean Pakistan.

So wake up, Pakistan, and let’s invade, loot and plunder like those great Muslim leaders, Mahmud Ghazni and Mr. T.

My next address to you all will be from Delhi Fort and anyone who disagrees is a traitor, a Hindu agent, or a student of the Peshawar University. Allah Hafiz! Punj … I mean, Pakistan, marhabba marhabba.”
 
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ajtr

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India, 'allies' using LeT mantra to blur Pak gains

ISLAMABAD – After Pakistan has successfully tracked down top brass of Al-Qaeda leaving little for Indo-Afghan camps to target Pakistan on every count of criticism, the Western bloc following historical Indian legacy regarding Pakistan - blurring the achievements and highlighting the otherwise - has altogether lobbied to wake up to India’s call to cast aspersions on Pakistan’s capabilities and intentions.
India’s newly found ‘obsession’ about banned militant outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), with allied powers at its back, has surfaced at a time when Pakistan not the India is worst affected by terrorism.
Overlooking the abominable game of bloodbath that rocked Pakistan last week in Lahore, Karachi, and parts of NWFP, the US Congress, quite ironically, held a hearing on the 11th of this month regarding LeT’s alleged role in terrorist attacks inside India. The Sub-committee of Congress on Foreign Affairs dealing with South Asia region headed by Gary Ackerman carried out the proceedings. The Subcommittee expressed its deep concern over ‘LeT’s growing ambitions in Pakistan.’
On the other hand, Ackerman’s led committee that thoroughly projected Indian version did not utter a word about terrorism in Pakistan sponsored by Indian terrorist camps in Afghanistan. Ackerman is known as a mouthpiece of India in the diplomatic circles and his connections with Indians out of political and financial motives are well known.
Apart from that, Indian Home Secretary Gopal Pillai’s statement about Pakistan’s involvement in Pune blast and Defence Minister AK Anthony’s sweeping assessment about 42 terrorist camps in Pakistan only further encouraged the so-called friends of Pakistan to malign the country further. General Petraeus is so obsessed with ‘Pakistan phobia’ these days that he had to utter last Tuesday that any terrorist attack in India would re-ignite Indo-Pak tensions. However, the General deliberately dodged commenting if the situation turned vice versa. He preferred to keep his lips tight to series of India-sponsored deadly attacks that took so many lives in Pakistan of late.A day after Petraeus’s statement, another military guru, Deputy Commander US Special Operations Command, Lt Gen Francis Kearney went a step ahead to ‘worry’ that terrorist groups like LeT would cause Indo-Pak war. He particularly referred to the presence of militants in Pakistan. A fresh addition to these pro-Indian assessments is General Petraeus’ statement that LeT is not on Pakistan’s ‘radar’ “but Pakistan Army has been taking strong action against Al-Qaeda and Taliban.”
Taking advantage of the floating tide, Hamid Karzai along with the ever foul-mouthed Indians and Americans, joined the bandwagon in speculating Pakistan’s intentions and expressed his ‘anger’, as reported in foreign media, on the arrest of Mullah Baradar. Under the prevailing pretext, his anger sounds quite a ‘pertinent move’ to further undermine Pakistan’s role.
Pakistan once again bowed in submission as reflected by Defence Minister’s statement to extradite Baradar despite LHC’s ruling against his extradition. It is evident that the arrangement set to exert pressure on Pakistan as a deviation tactic to blur its achievements against Taliban and Al-Qaeda has begun to show.
While Washington no longer can accuse Pakistan of not going tougher on the militants, it has found ‘LeT’s presence in Pakistan’ as an excuse to use Pakistan as scapegoat only to conceal India-sponsored terrorism coming from Afghanistan.
 

Neo

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I don't know what about the 10's of billions of dollars in terms of Aid.

The money they spent preparing for a war with India.

What about the F-16's

Cobra attack helicopters

Weapons systems to fight insurgency's


Pakistan has a got a lot of nerve to ask such a question.

when they themselves has done absolute Jack.

They Only started Fighting a year ago when the Taliban turned on them.

The reason the Americans are striking inside Taliban is because of Pakistan's In-action on all counts.
332 terror hits claimed 5,704 lives since 9/11

Thursday, March 18, 2010

LAHORE: The extent to which Pakistan has borne the brunt of the US-led War against Terror can be gauged from the fact that during the last 102 months since the 9/11 episode, the country has averagely been rocked by terrorists every 10th day during this period, which has witnessed 332 terrorism-related incidents inflicting 5,704 deaths till date.

While 58 terrorism-related incidents have jolted Peshawar (Charsadda and Darra Adamkhel included) since September 11, 2001, the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad have been hit 46 times by terrorists in these last eight and a half years.

A research conducted by The News, using statistics and chronology recorded by the US Department of State, archives of Pakistani newspapers and websites carrying

information about global terrorism, has revealed that while the port city of Karachi has been struck 37 times by terrorists during this period under review, Lahore has confronted such happenings on 21 occasions, the same number as the Swat valley.

While Quetta has so far seen blood pouring down its drains 18 times, Dera Ismail Khan has been attacked 16 times by the terrorists during this still ongoing war. The Pakistan Army personnel and installations of country’s armed forces, outside the war zones of Swat, South and North Waziristan etc, have been targeted at least 22 times during this time period under review.

Meanwhile, not fewer than 105 terrorism incidents have taken place since in the war-ridden Bajaur Agency, Kurram Agency, Orakzai Agency, Lower and Upper Dir, Mohmand Agency, South Waziristan and North Waziristan agencies etc.

The NWFP cities mainly hit include Hangu, Kohat, Shangla, Buner, Bannu, Mansehra, Buner, Haripur, Nowshehra, Lakki Marwat and Parachanar etc. Terror has also whacked the calm of Dera Bugti four times.

The residents of Bahawalpur, Sialkot, Hub, Sargodha and Faisalabad found themselves strapped in the grip of fear on two occasions each.

Horror also haunted Multan, Mian Channu, Taxilla, Pishin, Panjgur, Gujranwala, Wah, Dera Ghazi Khan, Kalat, Kamra, Bhakkar, Chakwal, Mianwali, Hassan Abdal and Muzaffarabad etc, at least once each.

During this fright-studded period, high-ranking al-Qaeda officials like Abu Zubaida and Ramzi Binalshibh were arrested by Pakistani officials on March 23, 2002, and September 14, 2002, respectively.

Similarly, on March 1, 2003, Wall Street Journal newsman Daniel Pearl’s killer Khalid Shaikh Muhammed was arrested during CIA-led raids on a suburb of Rawalpindi.

At the time of his capture, Khalid was the third highest ranking official in al-Qaeda and was believed to have supervised the planning for the September 11 attacks on the US.

Khalid Sheikh Muhammed was also linked the USS Cole bombing, an attempt to blow up a civilian airliner with a shoe bomb and the terrorist attack at a synagogue in Tunisia.

Claiming that it has lost around $35 billion since joining the still-continuing War on Terror, Pakistan witnessed only two terror-related incidents in 2001, 14 in 2002, just 8 in 2003, 18 in 2004, 11 in 2005, 16 in 2006, 56 in 2007, 72 in 2008, 130 in 2009 and 29 in the first two-and-a-half months of 2010 till the fling of this report.

The year 2009 of course remained the bloodiest of all with 130 incidents claiming around 1,800 lives, followed by 2008 which saw 1,565 people falling prey to 72 such attacks.

Terror in Pakistan claimed the lives of eminent personalities like the two-time Premier Benazir Bhutto (December 27, 2007), banned Anjuman-e-Sipah-e-Sihaba chief Maulana Azam Tariq (October 6, 2003), former Interior Minister Lt Gen (R) Moinuddin Haider’s elder brother Ehteshamuddin Haider (December 21, 2000), noted religious scholar Ghulam Murtaza Malik (May 7, 2002), eminent Deobandi scholar and head of Islamic religious school Jamia Binoria, Mufti Nizamuddin Shamzai (May 30, 2004), leading Shia scholar and Chief of Tehrik-e-Jafaria Pakistan, Allama Hassan Turabi (July 14, 2006), Chief of Peshawar City Police Malik Saad (January 27, 2007), former Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam MNA and Wafaqul Madaris Vice Chairman Maulana Hassan Jan (September 15, 2007), Pakistan Army’s top medic Lt Gen Mushtaq Baig (February 25, 2008), former head of Pakistan Army’s Special Services Group Maj Gen (R) Ameer Faisal Alvi (November 19, 2008), Awami National Party Provincial law-maker Alam Zeb Khan (February 11, 2009), leading Sunni Barelwi cleric Sarfraz Ahmed Naeemi (June 12, 2009), Punjab-born Balochistan Education Minister Shafiq Ahmed Khan (October 25, 2009), Balochistan’s Deputy Inspector General Nizam Shahid Durrani (November 19, 2009), ANP politician Shamsher Ali Khan (December 1, 2009), former NWFP Education Minister Ghani-ur-Rehman (January 3, 2010), Peshawar’s District Police Officer Iqbal Marwat (February 12, 2010) and Jamaat Ahl-e-Sunnat’s key leaders Mufti Saeed Jalalpuri (March 11, 2010) and Maulana Abdul Ghafoor Nadeem (March 14, 2010).

During this particular period, former President Pervez Musharraf survived three life attempts.

While Musharraf saw death close to him twice in December 2003, he also managed to survive the July 6, 2006, attack aimed at his life.

Then Corps Commander Karachi Lt Gen Ahsan Saleem Hayat also narrowly escaped on June 10, 2004, when gunmen opened fire at his convoy in Karachi.

On July 30, 2004, there was an unsuccessful assassination attempt on the Prime Minister-elect Shaukat Aziz, while he was campaigning for a by-election in Attock District.

On August 2, 2004, Balochistan Chief Minister Jam Mohammad Yousaf also managed to deceive death.

On April 28, 2006, the then Interior Minister Aftab Ahmad Sherpao, survived an assassination bid at Charsadda.

On July 17, 2007, another suicide bomber blew himself up outside the venue of the district bar council convention in Islamabad, just be-fore the arrival of Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry.

Former prime minister Benazir Bhutto also escaped unhurt on October 18, 2007, when her convoy was attacked in Karachi upon her return from a long exile, but could not ride her luck the second time she was fatally targeted on December 27, 2007.

On October 30, 2007, a suicide bomber struck a police checkpoint in the high security zone of Rawalpindi, less than a kilometre from President Musharraf’s Camp Office.

The blast also splattered the checkpost outside the residence of then Chief of the General Staff General Tariq Majid.

On November 9, 2007, a suicide bomber detonated explosives at the house of the then Federal Political Affairs Minister Amir Muqam in Peshawar. The minister escaped unhurt though.

On December 21, 2007, a suicide bomber again unsuccessfully targeted former Interior Minister Aftab Ahmad Khan Sherpao.

On June 9, 2008, controversial Swat cleric and chief of Tehrik-e-Nifaz-e-Shariat Muhammadi Maulana Sufi Muhammad survived a remote-controlled bomb.

On October 2, 2008, a suicide attacker targeted the Charsadda house of ANP leader Asfandyar Wali Khan, who survived the attack.

On October 6, 2008, a suicide attacker targeted a gathering at PML-N legislator Rashid Akbar Nawani’s house in Bhakkar. Nawani luckily survived the attack.

On November 11, 2008, a suicide bomber blew himself up at a packed Qayyum Stadium in Peshawar, minutes after the NWFP Governor Owais Ghani had left the venue and just moments prior to the departure of Senior Provincial Minister Bashir Bilour.

On March 3, 2009, a convoy carrying Sri Lankan cricketers and officials in two buses was fired upon near the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore. Six members of the Sri Lankan cricket team were injured.

On March 11, 2009, senior minister of the NWFP Bashir Bilour survived yet another assassination attempt in Peshawar.

On June 11, 2009, the NWFP Prisons Minister, Mian Nisar Gul Kakakhel, was

seriously injured when his convoy was ambushed by suspected militants in Darra Adam Khel.

On September 2, 2009, sitting Religious Affairs Minister Hamid Saeed Kazmi was injured in a brazen attack in Islamabad.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=229652

On February 9, 2010, renowned politician Sheikh Rashid Ahmed was attacked by militants in Rawalpindi, though Sheikh Rashid managed to live on by ducking the bullets.
This is the price we paid for US' let WoT. You have some guts to question our integrity!
 

Neo

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US will 'do more and announce more': Holbrooke


WASHINGTON (March 20 2010): The United States on Friday said it has made "huge advances" in its relationship with Pakistan and pledged "serious intense" discussions with the key ally on enhancing economic and security co-operation at next week's strategic dialogue.

The dialogue to be led by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi on March 24 "marks major intensification in our relationship," Special Representative Richard Holbrooke said. The strategic dialogue will be the first ministerial discussions and the first ever round of the process under the Obama Administration.

Defence Secretary Robert Gates, his counterpart Defence Minister Ahmed Mukhtar, senior Finance, Economic and Energy and Water officials from both countries, Pakistan Army Chief General Kayani and Chairman US Joint Chiefs Staff Admiral Mullen will also attend the dialogues, which Holbrooke said would not be a photo opportunity.

He indicated that the Obama Administration would "do more and announce more" to assist Pakistan's development in various fields. "Beyond the strategic broad-range discussions, we want to move into operational things like water, energy,"he added. The upcoming dialogue will have a "broad" and complex agenda, he said.

"These meetings are part of a process," the diplomat said at a special State Department briefing. He revealed the United States will return to Islamabad at the invitation of Pakistani government for the next round of the dialogues within six months and added that Secretary Clinton has in principle accepted the idea.

"It is a partnership that goes far beyond security. It represents the shared commitment of both nations to strengthening the bilateral relationship and building even a broader based on mutual respect and mutual trust," he said, referring to President Barak Obama's vision and the policy being pursued by Secretary Hillary Clinton.

The US, he said, is supporting Pakistan as it seeks to strengthen democratic institutions and seeks to foster more economic development, expand opportunities, deal with its energy and water problems and defeat extremists who threaten Pakistan's security regional stability as well as American national security. On building trust between the two sides, he called it "a work in progress" but added the two countries have made "huge advances" in ties under the Obama Administration.

He said the core of the dialogue includes US co-operation for Pakistan's economic and democratic development and security, destroying al Qaeda and helping Afghanistan's security. In the dialogue, Holbrooke said the two sides would be setting up working groups that will work at lower levels to discuss ways for enhancing co-operation in various areas.

In response to a question about the utilisation of funds under the Kerry-Lugar Act, Holbrooke said "we are looking for every way to accelerate the disbursement." "We are doing more, we will announce more, we want to do as much as the Congress will support -- but Congress writes the cheques," he added.

http://www.brecorder.com/index.php?id=1033721&currPageNo=1&query=&search=&term=&supDate=
 

dineshchaturvedi

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If your own created mad-dogs (for the purpose of being used against your enemies) starts biting you, who is at fault. All those attacks in Pakistan is because you allowed civilians to train like military and imparted military training to them. Who do you think taught them art of making bombs etc. The trainer or his trainer .. were trained by ISI/PA. What you saw is what you reap.
 

gogbot

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This is the price we paid for US' let WoT. You have some guts to question our integrity!
Oh you did so much did you.

Then why is it that the United states is forced to launch drone strikes on targets in your soil. Do they not trust you to get the job done your self ?

The list you gave me is a result of Pakistan's own internal problems. You created the Taliban with the Americans.
Once the Americans left you continued to support them. You should have snuffed them out them.
But you knew India would then gain a foot hold supporting the Northern Alliance.
So you put them in charge

Your leaders let they cross the border at will.

They set up shop in the Tribal areas , historic Peshawar and Swat.
How did this vermin infect your country so thoroughly, and this happened long before 9/11.

and for 10 long years India was forced to Fight an insurgency in Kashmir
An insurgency of Jihadits

However Indian Government believes Mujahideen fighters from Afghanistan slowly infiltrated the region, with Pakistan's help, following the end of the Soviet-Afghan War in 1989.
All this led up to Kargil where you failed.

10 years of that War on terror your fighting. And the very same people attacking India have now turned on Pakistan.

And today some how as a consequence, Kashmir is more peaceful. India troop levels are even decreasing.

strange how nothing came about, of Pakistan fighting the Taliban until 9/11.
What was it the Americans said, " we will bomb Pakistan to the stone age" .
Why is it that the Americans would call Pakistan and say such a thing , unless they already knew what Pakistan was up to all a along.

You lit a fire with the help of America. You defeated the soviet union and its allies.
and once the US lost interest, you decided that such a fire was in your best interests.
and you set fire to as many things as you could.

Well to be fair you did not pour the fuel, the fuel was always there.

But all that has happened since 2000 is the fire Pakistan has lit, coming back to its source.
The problem with lighting fire around you, you eventually get surrounded by your own menace.

Afghanistan , Balochistan , India and Even Iran.

All suffering some sort of insurgency. And Pakistan right in the middle.

Admittedly India ma have added to the fuel in baloch, but you lit that fire your self.

Back to topic.

Pakistan still has still not yet taken major operational action against the Talban.
Once since SWAT have you even begun taking back vast swats of territory back from the people who have slowly been taking it from a Inactive state.
And even now you refuse to fight what you call the good taliban.

Let alone groups like LeT and JMT .
 

Agantrope

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This is the price we paid for US' let WoT. You have some guts to question our integrity!
Integrity??? Available in which shop?

When predators are flying over your country and attacking the civilians as well as the militants. how come there is integrity and sovereignty of a nation is maintained. Simply pak is playing a double game with the US and protecting the taliban. Whats lets see for some more. US is reaping for what it harvested and burnt their a*se now in A'stan
 

nitesh

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welll........... I think US will do a zlich and keep the pressure up
http://www.newsweek.com/id/234926

..........

These results are still tentative. Pakistan's military retains its obsession with India—how else to justify a vast budget in a small, poor nation? It has still not acted seriously against any of the major militant groups active against Afghanistan, India, or the United States. The Afghan Taliban, the Haqqani group, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, Lashkar-e-Taiba, and many smaller groups all operate with impunity within Pakistan. But the Pakistani military is doing more than it has before, and that counts as success in the world of foreign policy.

Such success will endure only if the Obama administration keeps at it. There are some who believe that Pakistan has changed its basic strategy and now understands that it should cut its ties to these groups altogether. Strangely this naive view is held by the U.S. military, whose top brass have spent so many hours with their counterparts in Islamabad that they've gone native. It's up to Obama and his team to remind the generals that pressing Pakistan is a lot like running on a treadmill. If you stop, you move backward, and, most likely, you fall down.
 

DaRk WaVe

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If your own created mad-dogs (for the purpose of being used against your enemies) starts biting you, who is at fault. All those attacks in Pakistan is because you allowed civilians to train like military and imparted military training to them. Who do you think taught them art of making bombs etc. The trainer or his trainer .. were trained by ISI/PA. What you saw is what you reap.
CIA was also involved why you people forget that i mean why all blame on Pakistan, Americans are to be blamed as well & we are doing what we can to get rid of them & we are succeeding
Pakistan has right to gain what it can from US & BTW

Pakistani military to be part of strategic dialogue: Holbrooke


WASHINGTON: The Obama administration's ****** envoy on Friday said that there can be no strategic dialogue with Pakistan without the active participation of its military and the talks should not be at the expense of India.

This is the reason why Pakistan army chief General Ashfaq Pervez Kiyani and ISI chief Lt Gen Shuja Pasha have been included in the US-Pakistan strategic dialogue slated to be held in Washington next week.

Secretary of state Hillary Clinton and her Pakistani counterpart Shah Mahmoud Qureshi would be co-chairing the day-long meeting on March 24.

"How can you have a strategic dialogue without including the military," special US representative for Pakistan and Afghanistan Richard Holbrooke told reporters at the Foggy Bottom headquarters of the state department.

"If we have a strategic dialogue in our country, we're going to include the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff or some other representative. So we are very pleased that General Kayani is part of this delegation. We think that it's one country, one government, one team. It was their decision, and we welcomed it," Holbrooke said.

Responding to a question, Holbrooke said the strategic dialogue with Pakistan is not at the expense of India or any other country.

"We have an important strategic dialogue with India and with other countries, including China. Makes it all the more important we have one with Pakistan. But this is a bilateral dialogue. This strategic dialogue with Pakistan is not at the expense of any other country in the region," he said.

Holbrooke said the strategic dialogue means that the two countries talk about their basic core objectives, which defeating, destroying al-Qaida, helping the Afghans become self-reliant so they can take care of their own security, strengthening Pakistan's ability to own security, development, strengthening democratic institutions; all the things that secretary Clinton talked about during her trip.

"So we need to sit down with our Pakistani friends and hear their points of view and give us ours. Now, we've all been going to Islamabad and they've all been coming here," he said, adding beyond the strategic discussions, the broad range discussions, include to move into operational things in such areas as water, energy and other issues.

Holbrooke said the next round of US-Pakistan strategic dialogue would be held in Islamabad in next six months.

The Pakistani delegation of the next week's meeting include foreign minister Qureshi, minister of defence Ahmed Mukhtar, the finance minister, the foreign secretary, the Pakistani ambassador to the US, among others.

The US delegation would be led by Clinton and will include secretary of defence Robert Gates, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mullen and US ambassador to Pakistan Anne Patterson among others.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ic-dialogue-Holbrooke/articleshow/5704397.cms
Gogbot said:
And even now you refuse to fight what you call the good taliban.
I heard now we ahve a term called 'Moderate Taliban', Talk about
hypocrisy, The very fact that we are in a good position to make Indians pack their bags out of Afgh is indeed hurting(why it won't hurt), Pakistan has the right to do what it thinks is necessary for its 'interests', Indians are ,no doubt, going to have problems with it, But we are sorry, Pakistan ain't ruled by Indians
 
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DaRk WaVe

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Six power plants: US to extend $125 million for rehabilitation

MUSHTAQ GHUMMAN
ISLAMABAD (March 19 2010): United State (US) has agreed to extend $125 million to energy-starved Pakistan for rehabilitation of six hydro and thermal power plants, official sources told Business Recorder. The sources said US is expected to provide fund for repair and maintenance of units 1, 3 and 4 of Terbela Dam at an estimated cost of $16.5 million that would increase generation by 80 MW.

For rehabilitation of units 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Muzaffargarh Thermal Power Plant, US has agreed to extend $15.2 million. The sources revealed that Islamabad is hopeful of getting $18.4 million from US in one year for repair and maintenance of units 1-4 of 850 MW Jamshoro Thermal Power Plant.

According to sources Pakistan would receive $18.1 million for repair and maintenance of units CC-5, GT-7 and >-8 of Guddu Thermal Power Plant. US will also provide $60 million to improve power distribution system of Power Distribution Companies (Discos).

It is not known how much has been allocated by the US for the replacement of 1000 inefficient tube-well pumps. This financial assistance is apart from the 20 new energy sector projects, which are being submitted to the USG for funding. Pakistan and the United States are scheduled to hold the next round of strategic dialogue towards the end of the current month in Washington, with acquisition of civil nuclear technology and military to military co-operation on top of Pakistan's agenda.

Official documents reveal that the dialogue would focus on the entire gambit of co-operation, including economic, energy, defence, counter-terrorism, science and technology, education, agriculture, health, public diplomacy and consultations on security, strategic stability and non-proliferation. Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi will lead the Pakistani delegation, while US Secretary of State will represent the US.

The objectives of these talks are to provide strategic guidance/directions for strengthening US-Pakistan partnership in the 21st century, review progress and oversee implementation of agreed programmes/projects, comprehensively share perspectives on regional and global issues, chart a roadmap for promoting comprehensive co-operation based on the foundations of shared values, mutual trust and mutual respect.

http://www.brecorder.com/index.php?id=1032965&currPageNo=1&query=&search=&term=&supDate=
 

DaRk WaVe

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New approach in ties with US
By Baqir Sajjad Syed
Thursday, 18 Mar, 2010

ISLAMABAD: In a qualitative difference in Pakistan’s approach to the United States, Islamabad will, at the renewed Strategic Dialogue with Washington, seek ‘tangible deliverances’ particularly on its strategic concerns and wouldn’t settle for short-term relief measures.
The fourth round of the Strategic Dialogue on March 24, being dubbed by Pakistan’s foreign policy gurus as the ‘renewed process’, is expected to be one of the most intense diplomatic engagements the two countries had in the recent past.

Major politico-security stakeholders, including several federal ministers, army chief, director-general of ISI, and a number of federal secretaries will leave for Washington on Saturday to attend the meeting. The US representation at the dialogue, upgraded to ministerial level, will be equally strong. The team will be headed by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Other members will be National Security Adviser James Jones, Special Envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke and a number of other top officials of the Obama administration.

The level of participation by both sides, analysts believe, is indicative of the desire of Islamabad and Washington to give a new meaning to their bilateral relations hitherto marred by trust deficit.

“This round is going to determine the future of Pakistan’s relations with the United States,” a top official told Dawn, after attending one of the preparatory sessions aimed at developing a unified perspective among the country’s state organs for this engagement with Washington.

Pakistan is often referred to by Washington as a ‘key regional player’ and a ‘major non-Nato ally’ with whom it eyed a ‘long-term engagement’, but it is probably the first time that Islamabad’s strategists are feeling that the time has come to tell Washington to move on from symbolism and concretely address Pakistan’s core security concerns and its immediate economic needs.

Among the issues on which Islamabad desires solid assurances are protection of its legitimate interests in Afghanistan; normalisation of relations with India, including resolution of the Kashmir issue; end to instability in Balochistan; accepting Pakistan as a declared nuclear weapons state and thereby quashing all rumours that the US was secretly working to defang the country.

On Pakistan’s wish-list is also a strong desire for civilian nuclear cooperation on the pattern of India-US deal. Although Pakistan primarily wants nuclear cooperation to meet its growing energy needs, the issue has a political connotation also because Islamabad doesn’t want to see itself discriminated against and at a disadvantage vis-à-vis India.

Strong emphasis from the Pakistani side, senior diplomats at the Foreign Office say, is also expected on market access for its products to US and economic assistance at the dialogue, which now includes new strands like strategic stability, security, public diplomacy and health.

The Pakistani contingent will specifically tell the American interlocutors that the economic assistance needed to be fast tracked to arrest the economic decline believed to have been worsened because of the war on terror. The disbursement of Coalition Support Fund, a mechanism for repaying expenses incurred by Pakistan for supporting US counter-terrorism operations, has been sluggish and so has been the release of funds under the Kerry-Lugar-Berman Act. Only $400 million has so far been released under the aid legislation enacted last year.

Pakistan this year slashed its public sector development programme by over Rs150 billion because of shortage of funds.

Quite pragmatically, Pakistani policymakers are not deluding themselves into believing that their ties with the US will transform overnight and they will gain major concessions. But, they want the process to start.


“The extent to which the US is ready to accommodate our concerns and constraints will be a test of this engagement,” a senior army officer engaged in preparations for the visit remarked.

Senior officials say they will try to carefully use their leverages, which are largely Afghanistan related, to make the most of the dialogue.

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect...age/14-New-approach-in-ties-with-US-830-zj-07
 

gogbot

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I heard now we ahve a term called 'Moderate Taliban', Talk about
hypocrisy, They very fact that we are in a good position to make Indians pack their bags out of Afgh is indeed hurting(why i won't hurt), Pakistan has the right to do what it thinks is necessary for its 'interests', Indians are ,no doubt, going to have problems with it, But we are sorry, Pakistan ain't ruled by Indians
India was not the one to talk about moderate taliban.

It is Pakistan that sets up these talk with the "Moderate" taliban and America.
One has to wonder where ISI gets these moderate taliban from.

They very fact that we are in a good position to make Indians pack their bags out of Afgh is indeed hurting(why i won't hurt)
Oh and how do you plan on doing that.

ask the Americans. they will never do something so hostile.

Get the New government to side with you.
We have far more resources in politics then Pakistan.
Russia , India and Iran have more influence in Afghanistan then Pakistan.
You have to either change the entire power structure or muscle out all three

Get the taliban back in charge and start killing Indian's till they run. That might work or it might just invite more fighting.
Who knows all the violence may just make the Afghans start fighting you.
 

DaRk WaVe

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India was not the one to talk about moderate taliban.

It is Pakistan that sets up these talk with the "Moderate" taliban and America.
One has to wonder where ISI gets these moderate taliban from.
Cool, so the Mullah Bradar, sorry the Moderate Taliban, was bluffing? you got to blame Americans for this bluffing as well, I mean after all many people think that Capture of Mullah Bradar was because Quetta Shura wanted to shoot the trash out of it, when they don't know that Quetta Shura is effectively 'ineffective', you can 'wonder' from where we got them but thing is we have 'em


Oh and how do you plan on doing that.
ask the Americans. they will never do something so hostile.
Get the New government to side with you.
We have far more resources in politics then Pakistan.
Russia , India and Iran have more influence in Afghanistan then Pakistan.
You have to either change the entire power structure or muscle out all three
Get the taliban back in charge and start killing Indian's till they run. That might work or it might just invite more fighting.
Who knows all the violence may just make the Afghans start fighting you.
do I need to comment on this all, There is a thread going on, lurk around to see it, if you can & if you want to
India was, is & will never be a party in Afghanistan, you will poke your nose into our backyard we will act & we have the right to act
 
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Vinod2070

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CIA was also involved why you people forget that i mean why all blame on Pakistan, Americans are to be blamed as well & we are doing what we can to get rid of them & we are succeeding
Pakistan has right to gain what it can from US & BTW
What about Saudis and the Chinese? They also funded those Afghans back then?

Your government of the day took full keemat for letting the Americans help the Afghans. Many of your generals of the day became millionaires and more. No one was complaining as long as the going was good and after it was all over in Afghanistan, Pakistan used those terrorists in Kashmir and rest of India.

Now when the blow back came, you suddenly start making a noise that CIA created those terrorists? That they didn't help in reconstruction of Afghanistan! Why don't you accuse Saudis and China of abandoning Afghanistan as well? Most of all what did Pakistan do after 1989 to stabilize Afghanistan? Let loose the likes of Hekmatyar on them who burned the bloody place to the ground!

Did Pakistan ever ask for any reconstruction or help in the past when it had its fingers in the till? Pakistan has always profited from Afghan instability and the same is the case now.

Yes, you may continue doing that (bluffing the USA) as long as it works for you. USA has allowed itself to be taken for a ride and Pakistan has become quite adept at the game of negotiating with a gun to its own head. This is the phrase used by many Pakistani analysts as well.

I heard now we ahve a term called 'Moderate Taliban', Talk about
hypocrisy, They very fact that we are in a good position to make Indians pack their bags out of Afgh is indeed hurting(why i won't hurt), Pakistan has the right to do what it thinks is necessary for its 'interests', Indians are ,no doubt, going to have problems with it, But we are sorry, Pakistan ain't ruled by Indians
It is not about "Indians". Pakistanis with a zero sum mindset may gloat at what they perceive as a setback to India.

It is the Pakistani civil society that has been run to the ground since the beginning. The sectarianism, extremism and other problems have nothing to do with India and that is not going to go away irrespective of the level of Indian presence in Afghanistan.
 
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Vinod2070

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The old adage goes like this - Beggars are not choosers. But Pakistan is unique that they beg for alms but they also want to choose what they need. Choosy beggars!!!!.
Funnily they never choose to beg from the all weather friend! At least not in public!

They beg from Saudis also for free oil and even for settling their domestic political disputes. The begging of money and arms is mostly reserved for the great kaffir satan at war with the Muslims (as per them).

What does that make them!
 

Vikramaditya

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Pakistan should feel themself lucky enough that USA is with them...otherwise they were fighting their unwanted babies one day without resource,money and ....
 

ajtr

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ANALYSIS: Masters, not friends —Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur

The countries that survive on arms, hand-outs, cheap oil and aid from other countries for their survival cannot possibly be defiant or discourteous to those on whose largesse they depend

Civilised life is well nigh impossible without interaction between human beings and it is this activity that accords them the status of social animals. The social part survives only as long as the relationship is that of equals and is in no way demeaning and degrading. Once dignity and self-respect is removed from the equation, the social disappears and only the animal remains. This is true for all relationships whether personal, communal, national or international.

Human relationships have to be governed by principles of mutual respect and dignity. Any divergence from these principles distorts them, making one a master and the other a slave, one an overlord and other a vassal. Dignity for the deprived comes at a cost because the world is divided between the arrogant haves and the needy have-nots.

The demeanour of our rulers and politicians during interaction with the West and Gulf rulers is incongruous to the intercourse of equals and is analogous to supplications of a slave-serf to the overlord. The politicians and rulers who are indebted to countries or their rulers cannot, I repeat cannot, resist even the most preposterous demands that compromise sovereignty of the state or dignity of the people.

The obsequious tone and tenor adopted by the rulers and politicians emboldens even the petty emissary to dictate and reprimand them. The countries that survive on arms, hand-outs, cheap oil and aid from other countries for their survival cannot possibly be defiant or discourteous to those on whose largesse they depend.

Our country’s relationship with the US has always been of gravest concern. The objections and opposition to the current status of relationship is vehement and vociferous. The common man, though occupied mainly in eking out a living, expresses his resentment and justifiably so because he neither benefits nor is supposed to benefit from it. It is the political class that benefits in the form of the NRO deals, kickbacks and grants; ironically it is they who whine and gripe the most about the loss of sovereignty when the drones carry out the extra-judicial killings of militants along with heavy collateral damage. This sheer hypocrisy is just to hoodwink the people.

The influential Forbes magazine dubbed the US envoy here as the “ambassador to Pakistan’s economy” because she considers herself well within her rights when she comments on cancellation of deals or lectures on how best we run our economy. She, it seems, is managing the country and why should she not? This country survives on dole from the US.

Holbrooke feels no compunction when acting as a spokesperson for the army and saying, “The army in Pakistan is not interested in politics.” He has been insensitive and tactless time and again but then ‘one who pays the piper calls the tune’, so who can fault him? During his January visit he was upset with the criticism by the politicians and the media. He arrogantly said that an “acknowledgement of the US role would help get more aid for Pakistan”.

To show courtesy to visitors is the right thing but there has to be some veneer of dignity in it. You cannot go down to the level where it hurts even your detractors. The presidents here visit the shikar-camp of the UAE president in Cholistan that seems more like a district commissioner visiting the governor’s camp. The Gulf sheiks, apart from having pet politicians and rulers here, are also famous for endangering the endangered Houbara bustards and exploiting child jockeys.

However it would be unfair to blame any single party for the sin of being too obsequious to the US, Gulf States or for that matter the IMF; all are equally culpable. All politicians, political parties and rulers here have had their own ‘patron- saints’ and their darbars where they pay homage; some being more promiscuous than others but the dividing line between them is very thin indeed.

Surely the rulers and politicians here can never be in the mould of Fidel Castro or Hugo Chavez but they could at least retain an outward show of dignity and self-respect and not try to outdo Mr Hamid Karzai who, instead of being ashamed, gloats at his puppet status. He told CNN: “The US administration has helped Afghanistan and if we are called puppets, or if I am called a puppet because we are grateful to the US, then let that be my nickname.”

The title of Ayub Khan’s book, Friends Not Masters stank of crass hypocrisy even then as U-2 planes flew from Peshawar until Nikita Khrushchev threatened to bomb the place. The claims now of being equal partners in the ‘war on terror’ are even more crassly hypocritical. The drone attacks are criticised when drones are flown from bases here with tacit consent of all.

The relationship always was and will remain that of ‘Masters, not friends’ for the foreseeable future because dignity comes at a price. It demands sacrifices. Those who cannot do without the foreign accounts, mansions, Armani suits, Patek Philippe watches and bullet-proof Mercedes cannot be expected to break the begging bowl. The rulers here stay in the Sultan of Brunei suite at Dorchester Hotel in London, which costs £ 6,500 per night, while here there are scuffles and fist fights outside the utility stores for sugar and flour.

Only under the leadership of an ascetic like sage and statesman, Ho Chi Minh, could the Vietnamese achieve what they achieved. He lived in a small house in the sprawling grounds of colonial mansion for the French governor. Leadership truly matters when nations have to transcend the unattainable.

It is a long and difficult haul for dependent countries towards gaining a more respectable position in the equation of relationships with donor (read master) countries, especially when there is not only a complete lack of will for change but also an abject submissiveness to the philosophy of living on dole. With these state of affairs it is wishful thinking to presume that we are sovereign or will ever achieve that cherished and dignified status.

Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur has an association with the Baloch rights movement going back to the early 1970s. He can be contacted at [email protected]
 

Vinod2070

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do I need to comment on this all, There is a thread going on, lurk around to see it, if you can & if you want to
India was, is & will never be a party in Afghanistan, you will poke your nose into our backyard we will act & we have the right to act
And so says who? Pakistan's words don't match its capabilities.

Leave aside these imperialist ambitions of your wanabe Bonapartes. Afghnaistan and India will decide the level of our relationship. You are nowhere in the picture except that both countries have a territorial dispute with you. We are natural allies as you are in an anti India alliance with China in India's backyard (Pakistan)!

You may have the right to act and we have the right to react as well as proact. The conclusion is foregone. Pakistan's fate has been sealed by the course it has chosen for itself.
 
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