Pakistan doubling nuclear-bomb capacity: Reports

nrj

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we need to test a nuke and kill the whole Bush nuclear deal in a positive way, it will not impact us as much as it seems since we have individual deals with NSG,Russia and France.
Agreed! I say lets do hell with USA, cut them loose.....
Bush helped us get through NSG, IAEA (for which we are thankful to him) & we've got Russia, France ready to setup series of reactors. Lets bring in Canada too (US doesn't have that influence left on anyone already ) ............

Before that HOPE-MAN creates some more sh*t here, get the ICBM tested (with least payload maximizing its range ;) ) Anti-sat test with the current tech already employable & another "Furious Buddha"!

It'll shake up US the way it is required to make it understand the existence of India, which is underestimated consistently since the day HOPE-MAN stepped in White House...
 
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Obama can take the change he wants for USA and the rest of the world and shove it where the sun dosen't shine.
 
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Yusuf

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Oh pls guys the same US can undo what it did for us. It has all the clout required. The US maintains its pre-eminence in spite of all the problems since a couple of years. People talking about nuking them or getting at them in a confrontational manner are nothing but day dreaming and actually looks fan boyish. This forum can well do without such comments that become the butt of jokes.
 
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yusuf I agree, but i think we swung to far into the US camp we need to find a good middle and stay there. As far as leverage or any kind of retaliation goes there is not much will by the Indian govt to do anything, so hopefully the Indian govt knows something that we don't by it's continued pro -US policy; at the expense of many things.
 
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http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100326/wl_sthasia_afp/uspakistannuclearpolitics_20100326051821

Pakistan nuclear ambitions give US leverage





WASHINGTON (AFP) – Pakistan's hopes for civil nuclear cooperation have been a non-starter in Washington, but experts say the United States can use it as a dangling carrot as it seeks influence in Islamabad.

The two nations Thursday wrapped up a first-of-a-kind "strategic dialogue," which the United States hopes will show Pakistan's widely anti-American public that it cares about the country beyond seeking help against Islamic extremists.

US officials stayed carefully on message, pledging respect for Pakistan and never explicitly saying no to its requests -- a refusal that would have been sure to steal the headlines.

Pakistan is seeking a civilian nuclear deal along the lines of a landmark agreement that the United States struck with India in 2008. The South Asian rivals stunned the world in 1998 by carrying out nuclear tests.

Asked about the Pakistani request, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the United States would listen to "whatever issues the delegation raises" and highlighted a 125-million-dollar US package to boost Pakistan's energy sector.

A nuclear deal could help ease the developing country's chronic energy shortages. But it would also amount to US recognition of Pakistan as the Islamic world's only nuclear power, a point of pride for many Pakistanis.

"At the moment this looks like a non-starter, but it shouldn't be," said Marvin Weinbaum, a scholar at the Middle East Institute and former State Department official.

"There is no reason why we couldn't use this as a bargaining tool to get more cooperation, to say, 'This may not be something we can deliver now, but we would like to work something out with you,'" he said.

"It could have a very positive impact both with the Pakistani elite and public."

But the United States has longstanding concerns about proliferation from Pakistan -- and policymakers are said to have quietly drafted a crisis plan in case the nuclear arsenal risk falling out of government control.

The father of Pakistan's bomb, Abdul Qadeer Khan, has admitted leaking nuclear secrets to Iran, Libya and North Korea, although he later retracted his remarks.

The level of separation between Pakistan's military and civilian nuclear programs also remains a matter of dispute. Pakistan returned to civilian rule in 2008 and President Asif Ali Zardari a year later handed over control of the nuclear program to Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani.

"I think it's extremely premature to be talking about any civil nuclear cooperation between the US and Pakistan at this stage," said Lisa Curtis, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation think-tank.

"It would be more appropriate and important to be talking about conventional military cooperation, economic support and breaking down trade barriers," said Curtis, who served in the State Department in former president George W. Bush's administration.

Bush championed the nuclear deal with India, the signature part of his drive to build an alliance between the world's two largest democracies.

The agreement faced criticism from some members of President Barack Obama's Democratic Party, who argued that it sent the wrong message as India, like Pakistan and Israel, refuses to sign the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

"One of the reasons the US was able to move forward in Congress was because of India's solid record against proliferation and Pakistan doesn't have that," Curtis said.

Some critics who believe the Bush agreement was too easy on India said that Pakistan's requests confirmed their fears.

"I think the fact that we gave India such a sweetheart deal set a very dangerous precedent and it's no surprise that Pakistan wants a similar deal," said Leonor Tomero of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation.

She also said that Pakistan's request was "odd" coming so close to Obama's April 12-13 nuclear security summit in Washington and the Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference a month later.
 

nrj

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I accept, comments are getting down on cheap language but its out of anger & rather watching things going wrong with ramifications which are increasing the insecurity.....

We are not requesting arrogant actions from GOI , but time like this requires attention & smart moves.

If our good guy attitude bringing more long time problems then its time to re-think...
 

Yusuf

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We have swung in our own direction of self interest. For the first time since independence india is taking steps that suits its interests. It not dependent on anyone. All this talks about getting two close to any power is bull crap. India is only moving in the direction that secures its vital interest. No matter who says what, the nuke deal was secured to free our own fuel to make weapons and get international fuel for new and existing reactors. So who benefited? Did india get too close to the US? We needed something like the P8. No one has that. India got from the US. Who benefited more? India brings out MRCA which was modified to include even the F18s. This made the manufacturers come out with specific fighters for india. Who is going to benefit?

Really, we need to take notice of the good things that have happened in the last 10 years. Yes we will always be critical of out political leaders. But then that's what can keep them on their toes. Rest is decided by the technocrats and bureaucrats. All educated and capable. Yes corrupt, but still educated and capable. I have not seen them short sell india. We can always criticise everyone. Bush had his critics and so does Obama. Both following policies different fro, each other and still both criticised.
 

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