Pakistan building new nuke weapons: Report

RPK

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Pakistan building new nuke weapons: Report


New Delhi: In yet another confirmation of the expansion of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, a new report has revealed that the Islamabad is readying new nuclear facilities and weapons to go with it.

As per a media report, a top US nuclear scientists group has unearthed new evidence of Pakistan government’s continuing efforts to enhance its nuclear weapon stockpile.


The report says that Pak is expanding its fissile material stockpile for use in weapons, building two new plutonium production reactors and is also constructing a chemical separation facility for the purpose.

The report also says that nuke capable ballistic missile (Shaheen II) has also been readied for deployment. It is also developing a submarine launched ballistic missile, two new nuclear capable cruise missiles - the ground-launched Barbur and the air-launched Ra'ad - and.

However, the most concerning part is that Islamabad is keeping missiles with warheads in an assembled form, implying that they can be used anytime thus posing a grave danger to India’s security.

The report also mentions a satellite picture of what is almost certainly a Pakistani nuclear weapons storage site near the Masroor Air Force base, some 12 km from Karachi. The picture reveals the special security that nuclear weapons facilities have, as well as their well separated storage bunkers.

It is also feared that that Pakistan has increased its warheads to anywhere from 70 to 90 from the earlier count of 60.

In a major overhaul of its nuclear policy, Pakistan is supplementing its uranium based warheads with plutonium based warheads, the reason being that the Plutonium based warheads being lighter in weight have a greater range than their uranium counterparts – something clearly planned at bringing more Indian cities under its target range.

Incidentally, this new report comes just a few days after it was revealed that illegal modifications have been made in the American Harpoon anti-ship missile by Pakistan. The modifications were, allegedly, made to increase its capability to strike land based targets, a potential threat to India,
 

RPK

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Pak's 'India specific' nuke arsenal exposed- TIMESNOW.tv - Latest Breaking News, Big News Stories, News Videos

TIMES NOW has accessed a report prepared by top US nuclear scientists that suggests shockingly, that Pakistan is busily enhancing its nuclear weapons and productions capabilities across the board.

The report states that Pakistan is readying a new nuclear capable ballistic missile for deployment and two nuclear capable cruise missiles.

It also says that Pakistan is building two new plutonium production reactors and a second chemical separation facility.

The nuclear weapon facilities that are being expanded are located in Chasma, Khushab and Dera Ghazi Khan in southern Punjab.

Pakistan, according to the report by top strategic experts, is renewing work on a partially built separation plant at Chasma, and is also planning to build three more nuclear reactors at Chasma.

The details of three separate nuclear facilities at Khushab, Chasma and Dera Ghazi Khan have not been available in the public domain till now, and expose Pakistan’s secretive attempts to build up a substantial arsenal, likely to target India.

With regard to Khushab – the report says the country is building two heavy water reactors at the site which will more than triple the nation’s plutonium production and processing capability. Plutonium is one of the main fuels for nuclear weapons. The nuclear reactor will thus become a source while the under construction separation facility nearby, a means to purify the plutonium.

Based on official estimates of Pakistan’s current uranium and plutonium technology, scientists had so far thought the country far short of having a 100 nuclear war heads in its kitty - however the new report seems to suggest that Pakistan has much exceeded these earlier estimates, and from being able to build 30-40 nuclear weapons it actually could possess as many as 70-90 – a disturbing figure from India’s point of view and that of the US, currently debating financial and military aid to its friend in keeping with the Af-Pak agreement.

Moreover, if this report is true Pakistan is clearly going beyond the moratorium existing as an unwritten code of conduct in S Asia to halt the arms race. “The sheer aggressiveness of its activities is disturbing,” remarks in house defence expert Maroof Raza.

What is the significance of these new revelations? According to report, Pakistan has decided to supplement and replace its heavy uranium-based weapons with smaller, lighter, plutonium-based designs that could be delivered further by ballistic missiles than its current war heads. Ballistic missiles are important as they could reach targets as far afield as Mumbai – cities so far not covered by Pakistan’s earlier delivery programme. Ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and the refitting of nuclear bases and nuclear reactors cumulatively, is certainly bad news for India and something New Delhi will undoubtedly take note of with concern.

In an ironically revealing interview to MSNBC in May this year, Pakistan’s President Asif Ali Zardari had dodged the question whether his country was expanding its nuclear facilities. “It not a fact, it’s a position that some people have taken, we are not adding to out stockpiles as such. Why do need to?” he asked rhetorically, but when pressed to give a categorical answer, he said: “I don’t think so, no” and then added “Even if I did I wasn’t going to tell you.”

The scientific report: TIMES NOW’s reading of the essential points

The strategy behind Pakistan’s secret nuclear expansion is to increase and enhance its nuclear forces, build new facilities to provide the Pakistani military several options and build new facilities to fabricate weapons that use plutonium cores. It also wants to build new facilities to make composite cores and/or 'boosting' warheads yield, and supplement and replace heavy uranium-based weapons with smaller lighter plutonium-based designs to expand its range of ballistic missiles. In fact, Pakistan is already ready to deploy its short-range ballistic missile the Ghaznavi – a solid-fueled, single-stage missile which can deliver a 500-kg payload and has an on-paper range of 500 kms.

Pakistan is also currently developing two nuclear capable cruise missiles – the Babur cruise missile based on a new and smaller plutonium warhead, and a submarine-launched nuclear capable cruise missile.

It is also poised to induct its Shaheen I missile into its force. Shaheen I is ‘a reverse-engineered M-9 missile supplied by China’ and has a range of approximately 700kms.

Another development is that Pakistan is planning to replace the Ghauri with the Shaheen II, a still under development missile which has a range of 2,050 kms.
 

RPK

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Pak increasing nuclear weapons: US scientist

New Delhi: An American scientist has claimed that Pakistan has increased the number of its nuclear warheads from 60 to 90 and has kept them ready for use at any time.


Hans M Kristensen of the Federation of American Scientists in an article on the federation's website has also put up a picture of possible Pakistani nuclear weapons storage area about 12 km from Karachi.


The scientists say Pakistan is keeping its missiles with nuclear warheads in a completely assembled form and can launch them at a very short notice.


According to them a satellite picture shows that the Masroor Air Base near Karachi is where missiles like the medium range Shaheen maybe stored.


They also claim that Pakistan is developing two new cruise missiles - the ground-launched Babur and the air-launched Ra'ad.


The new cruise missiles will carry nuclear warheads miniaturised to fit onto them.


Moreover, two new plutonium production reactors are coming up and Pakistani scientists are also building a second chemical separation facility.


On the other hand India, which has a declared policy of no first use of nuclear weapons, keeps the warheads separate from the missile.


But Kristensen also writes that India is also increasing its nuclear stockpile and the increase in warhead does not mean Pakistan is "thought to be sprinting ahead of India".
 

bhramos

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Its a already know news,
India is telling everyone about it. none trusted it,
But now when US scientist tells to media everyone will start arguing it???
" What an Idea sirji".
hehehehehehe
 

RPK

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Pak enhancing N-capability to target India: US report

Top US nuclear scientists have shockingly revealed in a report that Pakistan is enhancing its nuclear weapons and production capabilities.

According to the report, which is yet to enter the public domain, Pakistan is readying a new nuclear capable ballistic missile for deployment and two nuclear capable cruise missiles. It also says that Pakistan is building two new plutonium production reactors and a second chemical separation facility at Chasma, Khushab and Dera Ghazi Khan in southern Punjab.

Pakistan is also renewing work on a partially built separation plant at Chasma. It is believed that this secretive and substantial arsenal build-up is targeted at India. Based on official estimates of Pakistan’s current uranium and plutonium technology, scientists had so far thought the country far short of having a 100 nuclear warheads in its kitty.

The new report, however, suggests that Pakistan has exceeded earlier estimates, and from being able to build 30-40 nuclear weapons it actually could possess as many as 70-90 a disturbing figure from India’s point of view and that of the US, currently debating financial and military aid to its friend in keeping with the AFPAK agreement. Moreover, if this report is true Pakistan is clearly going beyond the moratorium existing as an unwritten code of conduct in South Asia to halt the arms race.
 

Yusuf

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Nukes on hair trigger in Pakistan is certainly not good for india. Instable country which is in danger of falling to extremists, it's army and intel filled with rogues and command the nukes.
I think this development has to do with the US keeping it's eye on Pak nukes on it's current unassembled form and it's insecurity about a US- Israeli-India strike on such facility.
 

tharikiran

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Nukes on hair trigger in Pakistan is certainly not good for india. Instable country which is in danger of falling to extremists, it's army and intel filled with rogues and command the nukes.
I think this development has to do with the US keeping it's eye on Pak nukes on it's current unassembled form and it's insecurity about a US- Israeli-India strike on such facility.
I was thinking on the same lines as to what can be the reason behind pakistan increasing it's arsenal.

I think it's feeling insecure about India, US and Israel group.

How many more years do we need for our missile defense system to be mature ?
By the time these terrorists get their hands on nukes, our systems should be fully operational .I pray, we get couple of more years time before hell breaks lose.
 

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This is the original report found on fas.

Pakistani Nuclear Forces 2009


A high-security weapons storage area northwest of Karachi appears to be a potential nuclear weapons storage site.

By Hans M. Kristensen

Pakistan’s nuclear weapons stockpile now includes an estimated 70-90 nuclear warheads, according to the latest Nuclear Notebook published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. The estimate is an increase compared with the previous estimate of approximately 60 warheads due to Pakistan’s pending introduction of a new ballistic missile and cruise missiles.

The increase in the warhead estimate does not mean Pakistan is thought to be sprinting ahead of India, which is also increasing its stockpile.

Modernizations

The nuclear-capable Shaheen-II medium-range ballistic missile appears to be approaching operational deployment after long preparation. The Army test-launched two missiles within three days in April 2008, and the U.S. Air Force National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) reported in June 2009 that the weapon “probably will soon be deployed.”

Two types of nuclear-capable cruise missiles are also under development; the ground-launched Barbur and the air-launched Ra-ad. The development of cruise missiles with nuclear capability is interesting because it suggests that Pakistan’s nuclear weapons designers have been successful in building smaller and lighter plutonium warheads.

Warhead Security Concerns

An article published in the July issue of the CTC Sentinel news letter of the Combating Terrorism Center at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point gained widespread attention for describing terrorist attacks against three of Pakistan’s rumored nuclear weapons facilities: Wah Ordnance Facility, Kamra Air Base, and Sargodha Weapons Storage Facility. Although the incidents had been reported before, the article triggered the predictable rejection from a Pakistani military spokesman but with the additional claim that neither facility stored nuclear weapons. “These are nowhere close to any nuclear facility,” he said. Yet the official would most likely not disclose the location of the nuclear weapons, even if he knew where they were.

While the CTC Sentinel article says “most” of Pakistan’s nuclear sites might be close to or even within terrorist dominated areas, senior U.S. officials said the weapons were secure and mostly located south of Islamabad.

Regardless of the actual location of the weapons, there have, of course, been many more terrorists attacks against other facilities that have nothing to do with Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, and so far no pattern has emerged in public of a concerted terrorist effort against nuclear sites – much less an attempt to steel nuclear weapons. A U.S. intelligence official commented to the New York Times that it was unclear whether the attackers knew what the facilities contained. “If they were after something specific, or were truly seeking entry, you’d think they might use a different tactic, one that’s been employed elsewhere – such as a bomb followed by a small-arms assault.”

Pakistani and U.S. statements about the Pakistani nuclear arsenal, and the basis for our estimate, are included in the Nuclear Notebook.

This is the Nuclear notebook published in Bulletin of Atomic Scientists that the author is referring to

http://thebulletin.metapress.com/content/f828323447768858/fulltext.pdf (480kb)
 

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Pakistan enhancing its nuclear weapons capabilities

Updated on Tuesday, September 01, 2009, 23:16 IST Tags:pakistan, nuke, nuclear, weapons, Report

Zeenews Bureau

Washington: Pakistan is enhancing its atomic weapon capabilities across the board by developing and deploying new nuclear-capable missiles and expanding its capacity to produce fissile material, two US experts have said, estimating Islamabad has an arsenal of 70-90 warheads.

In an article published in the latest issue of "Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist," Robert S Norris and Hans Kristensen estimate that Pakistan's nuclear stockpile has jumped to an estimated 70-90 warheads from a previous figure of 60.


"A new nuclear-capable ballistic missile is being readied for deployment, and two nuclear capable cruise missiles are under development. Two new plutonium production reactors and a second chemical separation facility also are under construction," Norris and Kristensen wrote.

However they agree that it is exceedingly difficult to estimate precisely how many nuclear weapons Pakistan has produced, how many are deployed, and of what types.

"It is equally troublesome to guess what its future plans might be," the article says.

Norris is a Senior Research Associate at the Natural Resources Defense Council while Kristensen is Director, Nuclear Information Project at Federation of American Scientists.

The increase in the warhead estimate does not mean Pakistan is thought to be sprinting ahead of India, which is also increasing its stockpile, Kristensen writes in a condensed version of the report.

The two US experts believe that Pakistan's nuclear arsenal might not have crossed the 100 figure mark.

’Building more weapons’

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, ex CIA top official on weapons of mass destruction noted a more accelerated pace by Pakistan: "It took them roughly 10 years to double the number of nuclear weapons from roughly 50 to 100".

Following the example of other nations that have developed nuclear weapons, Pakistan is improving its weapon designs, moving beyond its first-generation nuclear weapons that relied on highly enriched uranium, the article said.

In anticipation of this increased plutonium production capacity, Pakistan also is expanding its capabilities to reprocess it, it added.

Satellite images show a second under-construction separation facility adjacent to the original that could handle the plutonium produced in the two new Khushab reactors.

"Work also may have resumed on a partially built separation plant that dates from the 1970s. This plant is located at Chasma, where Pakistan operates a 300-megawatt commercial reactor (CHASNUPP-1) and plans to build three more, one of which is under construction," it said.


Additionally, Pakistan is expanding its facilities at Dera Ghazi Khan in southern Punjab, where uranium hexafluoride and uranium metal are produced, the article said concluding that all of these efforts suggest that Pakistan is preparing to increase and enhance its nuclear forces.

In particular, the new facilities provide the Pakistani military with several options: fabricating weapons that use plutonium cores, mixing plutonium with HEU to make composite cores and/or using tritium to "boost" warheads' yield, the nuclear experts said.

In the absence of a successful full-scale thermonuclear test, it is premature to suggest that Pakistan is producing two-stage thermonuclear weapons, they said.

’Smaller N-bombs’

At the same time it noted that the types of facilities under construction suggest that Pakistan has decided to supplement and perhaps replace its heavy uranium-based weapons with smaller, lighter plutonium-based designs that could be delivered further by ballistic missiles than its current warheads and that could be used in cruise missiles.

Norris and Kristensen said Pakistani Air Force most likely assigns its US-manufactured F-16s a nuclear mission, though it also could use French-manufactured Mirage Vs.

The weapons storage in Sargodha Air Base, they wrote, has igloos but lacks the extra security features that would suggest that the base stores nuclear weapons.

"The assembled nuclear bombs and/or bomb components assigned to the F-16s stationed at the base may be kept at the large Sargodha Weapons Storage Complex. Another alternative is that, fearing a first strike by India, Pakistan stores its weapons at operational or satellite bases west of Sargodha, where F-16s could disperse to pick up their bombs," it said.

Pakistan has three types of operational ballistic missiles considered capable of delivering a nuclear warhead including the short-range ballistic missiles Ghaznavi (Hatf-3) and Shaheen-1 (Hatf-4) and the medium-range Ghauri (Hatf-5).

A fourth missile, the Shaheen-2 (Hatf-6), may soon become operational. Additionally, Pakistan also is developing two cruise missiles that US Air Force intelligence estimates may be nuclear capable.

The two experts added that Pakistan is keeping its missiles with nuclear warheads in a completely assembled form and can launch them at a very short notice.

According to them, a satellite picture shows that the Masroor Air Base near Karachi is where missiles like the medium range Shaheen maybe stored.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is a non-technical online magazine that focuses on global security and public policy issues, especially related to the dangers posed by nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. It has been published continuously since 1945, when it was founded by former Manhattan Project physicists after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Bureau Report with IANS inputs


Zeenews Bureau

Washington: Pakistan is enhancing its atomic weapon capabilities across the board by developing and deploying new nuclear-capable missiles and expanding its capacity to produce fissile material, two US experts have said, estimating Islamabad has an arsenal of 70-90 warheads.

In an article published in the latest issue of "Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist," Robert S Norris and Hans Kristensen estimate that Pakistan's nuclear stockpile has jumped to an estimated 70-90 warheads from a previous figure of 60.


"A new nuclear-capable ballistic missile is being readied for deployment, and two nuclear capable cruise missiles are under development. Two new plutonium production reactors and a second chemical separation facility also are under construction," Norris and Kristensen wrote.

However they agree that it is exceedingly difficult to estimate precisely how many nuclear weapons Pakistan has produced, how many are deployed, and of what types.

"It is equally troublesome to guess what its future plans might be," the article says.

Norris is a Senior Research Associate at the Natural Resources Defense Council while Kristensen is Director, Nuclear Information Project at Federation of American Scientists.

The increase in the warhead estimate does not mean Pakistan is thought to be sprinting ahead of India, which is also increasing its stockpile, Kristensen writes in a condensed version of the report.

The two US experts believe that Pakistan's nuclear arsenal might not have crossed the 100 figure mark.

’Building more weapons’

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, ex CIA top official on weapons of mass destruction noted a more accelerated pace by Pakistan: "It took them roughly 10 years to double the number of nuclear weapons from roughly 50 to 100".

Following the example of other nations that have developed nuclear weapons, Pakistan is improving its weapon designs, moving beyond its first-generation nuclear weapons that relied on highly enriched uranium, the article said.

In anticipation of this increased plutonium production capacity, Pakistan also is expanding its capabilities to reprocess it, it added.

Satellite images show a second under-construction separation facility adjacent to the original that could handle the plutonium produced in the two new Khushab reactors.

"Work also may have resumed on a partially built separation plant that dates from the 1970s. This plant is located at Chasma, where Pakistan operates a 300-megawatt commercial reactor (CHASNUPP-1) and plans to build three more, one of which is under construction," it said.

Additionally, Pakistan is expanding its facilities at Dera Ghazi Khan in southern Punjab, where uranium hexafluoride and uranium metal are produced, the article said concluding that all of these efforts suggest that Pakistan is preparing to increase and enhance its nuclear forces.

In particular, the new facilities provide the Pakistani military with several options: fabricating weapons that use plutonium cores, mixing plutonium with HEU to make composite cores and/or using tritium to "boost" warheads' yield, the nuclear experts said.

In the absence of a successful full-scale thermonuclear test, it is premature to suggest that Pakistan is producing two-stage thermonuclear weapons, they said.

’Smaller N-bombs’

At the same time it noted that the types of facilities under construction suggest that Pakistan has decided to supplement and perhaps replace its heavy uranium-based weapons with smaller, lighter plutonium-based designs that could be delivered further by ballistic missiles than its current warheads and that could be used in cruise missiles.

Norris and Kristensen said Pakistani Air Force most likely assigns its US-manufactured F-16s a nuclear mission, though it also could use French-manufactured Mirage Vs.

The weapons storage in Sargodha Air Base, they wrote, has igloos but lacks the extra security features that would suggest that the base stores nuclear weapons.

"The assembled nuclear bombs and/or bomb components assigned to the F-16s stationed at the base may be kept at the large Sargodha Weapons Storage Complex. Another alternative is that, fearing a first strike by India, Pakistan stores its weapons at operational or satellite bases west of Sargodha, where F-16s could disperse to pick up their bombs," it said.

Pakistan has three types of operational ballistic missiles considered capable of delivering a nuclear warhead including the short-range ballistic missiles Ghaznavi (Hatf-3) and Shaheen-1 (Hatf-4) and the medium-range Ghauri (Hatf-5).

A fourth missile, the Shaheen-2 (Hatf-6), may soon become operational. Additionally, Pakistan also is developing two cruise missiles that US Air Force intelligence estimates may be nuclear capable.

The two experts added that Pakistan is keeping its missiles with nuclear warheads in a completely assembled form and can launch them at a very short notice.

According to them, a satellite picture shows that the Masroor Air Base near Karachi is where missiles like the medium range Shaheen maybe stored.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is a non-technical online magazine that focuses on global security and public policy issues, especially related to the dangers posed by nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. It has been published continuously since 1945, when it was founded by former Manhattan Project physicists after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Bureau Report with IANS inputs

Pakistan building new nuke weapons: Report
 

WaleedGilani

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Pakistan Test Fires Nuclear Capable Shaheen-2 Ballistic Missile

April 20th, 2008: Pakistan successfully test fired its intermediate range (IRBM) range Surface to Surface Ballistic Missile Hatf VI (Shaheen II). The missile test was conducted as part of process of validation and technical improvements to consolidate and verify various land based strategic missile systems. It may be recalled that Hatf VI (Shaheen II) is Pakistan’s longest range ballistic missile system with a range of 2000 Kms. It is a two stage fuel missile which can carry nuclear and conventional warheads with high accuracy.

Missile was launched from an undisclosed location. The test was witnessed by Prime Minister Syed Yousaf Raza Gilani, who congratulated the scientists and engineers of Strategic Organizations on achieving an important milestone in Pakistan’s quest for sustaining strategic balance in South Asia. Speaking after the successful test, the Prime Minister made it clear that Pakistan’s strategy of credible minimum deterrence is fully in place and is a guarantee of peace in the region. He assured that the defence needs of the country will remain a high priority with the elected government. He further added that the strategic program which enjoys complete national consensus will continue to be consolidated and further strengthened in line with the needs of national security.

The test was also witnessed by the Defence Minister Choudhary Ahmed Mukhtar and Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee, General Tariq Majid, besides senior military officers and scientists. In an exclusive message, the President of Pakistan Pervez Musharraf has also congratulated the Strategic Organizations on this outstanding success.
 

SATISH

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Sir we have enough Tritium already for it....the Pakistanis have just started building plutonium based weapons we have to see for their next move and plan ours.
 

nirma1230

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pakistan is an sovereign country, and doing well for defense, but want to keep maintain peace in the region,
 

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