Obama: 'Russia Doesn't Make Anything'

HMS Astute

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama dismissed Russia as a nation that "doesn't make anything" and said in an interview with the Economist magazine that the West needs to be "pretty firm" with China as Beijingpushes to expand its role in the world economy.
Obama has tried to focus U.S. foreign policy on Asia, a response to China's economic and military might. But for months, that "pivot" has been overshadowed by a flurry of international crises, including Russia's support for separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Russia is the world's third-largest oil producer and second-largest natural gas producer. Europe relies heavily on Russian energy exports, complicating the West's response to the Ukraine crisis.

Obama downplayed Moscow's role in the world, dismissing President Vladimir Putin as a leader causing short-term trouble for political gain that will hurt Russia in the long term.

"I do think it's important to keep perspective. Russia doesn't make anything," Obama said in the interview.

"Immigrants aren't rushing to Moscow in search of opportunity. The life expectancy of the Russian male is around 60 years old. The population is shrinking," he said.

Obama told Putin last week that he believes Russia violated the 1988 Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces treaty designed to eliminate ground-launched cruise missiles.

Speaking of Russia's "regional challenges," Obama said in the interview: "We have to make sure that they don't escalate where suddenly nuclear weapons are back in the discussion of foreign policy."
Read more: Obama: 'Russia Doesn't Make Anything' - Business Insider
 

Razor

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@pmaitra @Samar Rathi @happy @Mad Indian @Cadian

Guys, check this out. Even the President of the US is now resorting to cheap propaganda (which is usually the domain of Western press.)

From the article

Lie #1: "Russia doesn't make anything"
Sure, a country that exports $515 B doesn't make anything. Lol. Lie shattered.

Lie #2: "Immigrants aren't rushing to Moscow in search of opportunity."
Russia has the second largest immigrant population on the planet at over 11 million. This excludes the near 3 million illegal immigrants. Lie shattered.

Lie #3: "The life expectancy of the Russian male is around 60 years old"
The life expectancy of the Russian male is 65 and female is 76 (Overall 70). Lie shattered.

Lie #4: "The population is shrinking"
Policies in Russia (after the disastrous 90s of Yelsin), ensured that the decline in population slowed down. And for the last few years population has started showing a natural population growth. Lie shattered.

Sources:
List of countries by exports - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
List of countries by life expectancy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
List of countries by foreign-born population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Demographics of Russia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also I would like to shatter one more that @asianobserve said earlier in another thread (here post #2118: http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/europe-russia/61895-civil-war-ukraine-142.html#post929446)

He says
My suggestion is that start counter checking whatever article you come across with:

1. First, is the article or issue picked up by established media companies like Reuters, AP, AFP, Al JAzeera, Guardian? You know why, these media companies have specialised employees that check on raw information that reaches them. The better rule is to wait until at least 3 or more of the established international media companies have adopted a report before you start talking about it or referencing it.
Looks like the specialized employees forgot to check the raw data, so that the propaganda value is not diminished.
 
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HMS Astute

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Lie #1: "Russia doesn't make anything"
Sure, a country that exports $515 B doesn't make anything. Lol. Lie shattered.
It's actually incorrect to say that Russia "doesn't make anything" but their exports are dominated by only natural resources.



I wonder what the "unclassified transactions" are, hm.
 
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HMS Astute

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Lie #4: "The population is shrinking"
Policies in Russia (after the disastrous 90s of Yelsin), ensured that the decline in population slowed down. And for the last few years population has started showing a natural population growth. Lie shattered.
List of European countries by population growth rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Country Rank Percent growth (%)
1 Ireland +1.77
2 Cyprus +1.62
3 Turkey +1.31
4 Luxembourg +1.15
5 San Marino +1.04
United States +0.77
6 Iceland +0.69
7 Liechtenstein +0.65
8 Spain +0.57
9 United Kingdom +0.56
10 France +0.50
11 Faroe Islands (Denmark) +0.43
12 Italy +0.42
13 Kazakhstan +0.40
14 Malta +0.38
15 Netherlands +0.37
16 Andorra +0.33
17 Norway +0.33
18 Albania +0.27
19 Denmark +0.25
20 Macedonia +0.25
21 Portugal +0.21
22 Switzerland +0.21
23 Sweden +0.16
- European Union +0.16
24 Slovakia +0.12
25 Greece +0.08
26 Finland +0.08
27 Belgium +0.07
28 Armenia +0.06
29 Austria +0.03
30 Bosnia and Herzegovina +0.01
31 Poland -0.06
32 Moldova -0.07
33 Croatia -0.08
34 Czech Republic -0.12
35 Monaco -0.12
36 Slovenia -0.16
37 Hungary -0.17
38 Germany -0.21
39 Romania -0.25
40 Lithuania -0.28
41 Georgia -0.33
42 Belarus -0.36
43 Russia -0.47
44 Serbia -0.47
45 Latvia -0.60
46 Ukraine -0.62
47 Estonia -0.64
48 Montenegro -0.71
49 Bulgaria -0.78
 
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Ray

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Saudis also don't make anything and they are living off the oil.

Yet, the can manipulate the US around their little finger!

With gay marriages allowed, the population will dwindle wherever it is allowed.

Double Income, No Kids is the mantra.

Rather selfish an idea.
 
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Razor

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It's actually incorrect to say that Russia "doesn't make anything" but their exports are dominated by natural resources.
Yeah, that's true. It is dominated by energy sector, but it is also made in Russia and doesn't just magically appear.
And yes, the concentration on a particular sector may not be a good idea. But you must understand that Russian economy was designed this way due to policies of predecessors over the decades, and you can not just magically change it over night. It takes time and it is happening.
 

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Ray

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US, EU space missions depend on Russian tech
If Russia were to boycott space missions due to the Ukraine crisis, the results would be dramatic for the United States and Europe. Without Russian technology, Western countries' missions couldn't get off the ground.


Six people are currently on board the International Space Station (ISS): three Russians, one astronaut from Japan and two Americans. They each headed up by way of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Currently, there is no other way to reach the ISS.

After the United States turned its space shuttle fleet into the stuff of museums three years ago, Russian capsules are the only ones crossing the 400 kilometers (250 miles) to bring people to the ISS and back. That will remain true through 2017 at the earliest. NASA isn't set to reacquire space ships capable of undertaking the journey until then.
Interdependent

A sudden stop to cooperation with Russia in space would mean nothing short of an end to the ISS. Astronauts from Europe and the United States could no longer go into space, and Russia would lose technical and financial support from the US that facilitates communication, equipment and the provision of materials for the space station.
All of the partners involved in the ISS depend on one another as the module complex is much too large for national solo runs. In recent weeks, Charles Bolden, a former astronaut and current head of NASA, stressed that the international partnership on space exploration remains strong.

NASA pays around $70 million (50.7 million euros) for each astronaut's journey in a Soyuz rocket. The flow of this cash to Russia has to be specially approved on a case by case basis by Congress. At a recent congressional hearing, Bolden said these journeys to the ISS are not simply a matter of routine but are indispensible for future space missions.

It's there that NASA tests new materials for missions to the moon and possibly to Mars, while US astronauts gain valuable medical expertise. As recently as January, US President Barack Obama had stipulated the US would continue its involvement with the ISS for at least 10 years - seeking as much cooperation as possible with the partners Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada.

US shuttles with Russian engines
Apart from the ISS, there are almost no joint projects between the United States and Russia in space - meaning no shared missions to the moon or other targets in the solar system. However, even when it comes to launching their satellites, the US depends heavily on Russian technology. Atlas V rockets, one of the workhorses of the US space program, use Russian-built engines.

Many of the US Department of Defense's reconnaissance satellites take off using a rocket that couldn't operate without Russian technology. That's a dependency that cannot be eliminated quickly. Suitable replacement rockets aren't available in the required quantity and propulsion devices cannot simply be switched without affecting the entire system. In the event of a Russian boycott, there would soon be no Atlas V take-offs from the Cape Canaveral launching site.
Freight capsules with Ukrainian tech

The US also depends on Russian technology when it comes to a new system for transporting freight into space. After ending its own shuttle launches, NASA commissioned private companies with providing supplies and undertaking scientific experiments at the ISS. However, America's new Cygnus cargo craft operates using an Antares rocket, part of which is manufactured in the Russian-leaning region of Ukraine.

Should the United States drastically reduce its cooperation with Russia, Europe wouldn't be able to fill in the gaps. The European Space Agency's ATV freighter will only fly once more to the ISS and then will no longer be built, and Europe has never had a manned spacecraft of its own. Although Europe's Ariane rocket has proven very reliable, it cannot bring people to space. European politicians overseeing space policy have for decades blocked the development of a manned European mission to space, citing cost concerns.

Meanwhile, German geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently training in Russia for his trip to the ISS. At the end of May, he is set to take up a post there for six months - though that will only happen if Europe and Russia continue their space cooperation. In November, Italy's Samantha Cristoforetti is scheduled to take over for him. The ESA depends on Russia's flight technology, and its missions draw on more intensive cooperation with the Russian Roscosmos agency than American missions do.
After NASA gruffly pulled out of the joint ExoMars project two years ago, Russia jumped in to take its place. The ESA now wants to use Russian support to land on Mars in order to search for signs of life using an automated research laboratory.
China as the sole alternative
China is the only current alternative when it comes to manned space missions, but the country is not a partner in the ISS. For political hardliners in Europe and the US, it would only be making matters worse to switch from Russian to Chinese technology in the future.
The space cadets themselves tend to take a relaxed approach to the saber-rattling of earth-bound politicians. On joint missions, nationality plays no role as astronauts have to be able to depend on their colleagues in space.
NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman, who will fly to the ISS together with Gerst and Russia's Maxim Suraev, has praised Russian hospitality and the highly professional training he has received there. Wiseman said once they launch, they will go as "three friends" into space.
US, EU space missions depend on Russian tech | Sci-Tech | DW.DE | 30.04.2014

Think Russia has no way to put pressure on the United States? Think again.

The US relies heavily on Russia to furnish the engines that power rockets that deliver both military and civil payloads into space.

This includes GPS systems in cars and cellphones, and even systems that allow ATMs to function. Weather satellites are launched into space via Russian-powered rockets, and military systems such as early missile detection also depend on our friends in Moscow.

In addition, since NASA scrapped the space shuttle program in 2011, the US has to rely on Russian Soyuz capsules to get its astronauts to the space station and to bring them back home.

As the crisis over Crimea deepens and tit-for-tat sanctions go into effect, conventional wisdom has held that the US is holding all the cards. Given the relatively small amount oftrade the US conducts with Russia each year, and its pre-eminent position as the world's largest economy, Washington has projected confidence as it moves to isolate Moscow diplomatically and economically.

But Russia is unlikely to take it lying down. As Stephen Walt, professor of international affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, warned in a talk at Harvard recently, "They have ways of responding [to sanctions] that "¦ we're not going to like."

One of the things Americans may dislike very much indeed is a possible ban on the sale of RD-180 engines to the US under a contract with Russian manufacturer NPO Energomash.

The RD-180 powers the Atlas V rocket, the main launch vehicle used to get US military and civil payloads into space.

"The Russian rocket engines are the best in the world," said Royce Dalby, a space systems expert and managing director of Avascent, an aerospace and defense consulting firm in Washington, DC. "RD-180 provides the most efficient and least expensive means of getting our national security payloads into space."

The dollar amounts are not great, relatively speaking: While the actual price paid for the engines is proprietary, experts estimate the cost from $11 million to $15 million per engine.

In an average year the US launches eight or nine satellites with the Atlas V.

But it gives the Russians a virtual stranglehold on the US space program, including systems vital for national security.

Over the next 24 months, according to Dalby, the Atlas V will be used to launch four classified spy satellites for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), one unclassified imagery satellite, two weather satellites, four GPS satellites, three military communications satellites, two classified payloads for the Air Force and one NASA science satellite.

"[Losing the RD-180] would be a blow to our national security," said John Logsdon, the founder and long-time director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University. "The Atlas V is the primary vehicle we use to launch military and civil pay loads into space."

The question of US dependence on Russian rockets has begun to worry the defense establishment as well.

Testifying at a budget hearing of the House Appropriations Committee in mid-March, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel indicated that the Pentagon was concerned about the RD-180 issue.

When asked by an Alabama congressman whether the crisis in Ukraine would prompt the Defense Department to move ahead with additional funding to develop domestic capabilities to manufacture rocket engines, Hagel responded that it certainly would.

"You're obviously referring to the relationship with the Russians on the rocket motors," the defense secretary said. "Well, I think this is going to engage us in a review of that issue. I don't think there's any question about that."

But developing a domestic capability will be a long and expensive process.

United Launch Alliance (ULA), the Lockheed Martin-Boeing joint venture that manufactures the Atlas V rocket, says it has the situation well in hand.

"Atlas V will continue to provide assured access to space for our nation's national security satellites," the Centennial, Colo.-based company said in a written reply to questions. "ULA maintains more than a two-year supply of RD-180 engines in the United States to minimize potential supply disruptions, and has developed significant engineering and manufacturing capability which ultimately demonstrated the capability to co-produce the RD-180 domestically."

Company spokeswoman Jessica Rye, however, acknowledged that ULA does not at present have an alternative rocket engine in the pipeline.

"We have not pursued an alternative engine," she said. "Any new engine development would be a four-to-five year process."

The history of US-Russian cooperation on space issues goes back to the chaotic 1990s, right after the collapse of the Soviet Union. With communism in retreat, US-backed companies and organizations poured billions into helping Russia get on its feet.

In science, especially space technology, Washington was intent on keeping Russian scientists peacefully engaged, to discourage them from selling their skills elsewhere.

Besides, there was world-class technology and know-how to pick up at bargain-basement prices.

"[The Russians] had accomplished a heck of a lot in space, and we knew we could learn from their capabilities," said Dalby, who himself worked in Moscow in the 1990s.

But times change, and the heady promise of friendship and cooperation gave way to a frostier relationship once Vladimir Putin came to power on New Year's Day, 2000.

Russia has threatened to pull the plug on the RD-180 before.

Last August, when President Barack Obama was contemplating military action against Syria over the use of chemical weapons, Russian media reported that the government was considering a halt in the RD-180 program.

According to Dalby, this produced a near panic in the space industry.

There may be alternatives on the horizon. Elon Musk, head of SpaceX, a company looking to unseat ULA as the Air Force's go-to rocket builder, testified before Congress in mid-March.

"In light of Russia's de facto annexation of the Ukraine's Crimea region and the formal severing of military ties, the Atlas V cannot possibly be described as providing 'assured access to space' for our nation when supply of the main engine depends on President Putin's permission," Musk told the committee.

Instead, he proposed his Falcon rockets, which he said could provide high reliability at a much lower cost.

But the Falcon would not be able to do the job without extensive, and expensive, tweaking, Dalby says.

"The Falcon rocket is smaller and can't loft most of the military payloads that the Atlas tackles," Dalby said. "Also, satellites are designed to fly on certain rockets from the outset, and it would take years to reconfigure, if it would even be possible."

According to George Washington University's Logsdon, the Delta IV engine, which is produced entirely in the US, could step in, but it might have to be adjusted a bit for the task.

There is also the possibility that Pratt & Whitney, which has a joint venture with NPO Energomash, could take over production. According to Logsdon, the US contractors have access to the blueprints for the engine.

"But there is a fair degree of art as well as science here," he said. "The Russians are extremely experienced in advanced metallurgy and design. You cannot just snap your fingers and make it happen."

Then there is the space station — the US pays the Russians over $400 million a year to transport US astronauts there and back.

"And for that there is no alternative," Logsdon said.

So for now the US is in a delicate balancing act — trying to combine strong censure of the Kremlin's behavior with a cooperative relationship with Russia on space.

"For the record I still think cooperation with Russia is a good idea," Dalby said. "The International Space Station program, especially, has been a tremendous platform for building trust and mutual understanding. Unfortunately, it can't overshadow more terrestrial problems."
http://www.salon.com/2014/03/26/how_russia_could_strangle_the_us_space_program_partner/
 
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Razor

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List of European countries by population growth rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Country Rank Percent growth (%)
1 Ireland +1.77
2 Cyprus +1.62
3 Turkey +1.31
4 Luxembourg +1.15
5 San Marino +1.04
United States +0.77
6 Iceland +0.69
7 Liechtenstein +0.65
8 Spain +0.57
9 United Kingdom +0.56
10 France +0.50
11 Faroe Islands (Denmark) +0.43
12 Italy +0.42
13 Kazakhstan +0.40
14 Malta +0.38
15 Netherlands +0.37
16 Andorra +0.33
17 Norway +0.33
18 Albania +0.27
19 Denmark +0.25
20 Macedonia +0.25
21 Portugal +0.21
22 Switzerland +0.21
23 Sweden +0.16
- European Union +0.16
24 Slovakia +0.12
25 Greece +0.08
26 Finland +0.08
27 Belgium +0.07
28 Armenia +0.06
29 Austria +0.03
30 Bosnia and Herzegovina +0.01
31 Poland -0.06
32 Moldova -0.07
33 Croatia -0.08
34 Czech Republic -0.12
35 Monaco -0.12
36 Slovenia -0.16
37 Hungary -0.17
38 Germany -0.21
39 Romania -0.25
40 Lithuania -0.28
41 Georgia -0.33
42 Belarus -0.36
43 Russia -0.47
44 Serbia -0.47
45 Latvia -0.60
46 Ukraine -0.62
47 Estonia -0.64
48 Montenegro -0.71
49 Bulgaria -0.78
First of all I don't trust the accuracy of the source of the data you provided (CIA World factbook) and also it is dated 2011.

Second from source I posted in my first post

In 2013, Russia experienced the first natural population growth since 1990 at 22,700 people. Taking into account immigration, the population grew by 294,500 people.
 

Ray

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Obama is actually a dumb chap.

He cannot see beyond his nose.

The US is in big trouble since he is myopic but high on hyperbole.

Sometimes, I am constrained to feel Bush was a better bet.
 

HMS Astute

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obama forgot to mention the fact that nobody makes awesome movies like hollywood does and nobody watches russian movies except the russian themselves lol...
 

HMS Astute

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Moderate weather.

Less discrimination.

But worries for the US, since it is swamping the WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) demography.
cant believe they still receive and accept that much immigrants although they have very strict immigration rules since 9/11.
 

Ray

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cant believe they still receive and accept that much immigrants although they have very strict immigration rules since 9/11.
They can't help it.

They, to survive, also requires brain to pull them through.

Imagine a nation proud to have a dimwit and celebrating the same, as the hockey mom and a pig with a lipstick, Sarah Palin!

That idiot had no sense of how the world ticks or even basic education that other countries demand of their leaders.

And Joe the Plumber as the icon of American people!

So, such a country sure requires some foreign brains to keep them on even keel!

Whatever the US has achieved after the Monroe Doctrine is through immigrant brains!

And they also want illegal Mexicans too to engine their economy!

That is why it is a cauldron of confused nationhood!

And that is why they survive!
 
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HMS Astute

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They can't help it.

They, to survive, also requires brain to pull them through.

Imagine a nation proud to have a dimwit and celebrating the same, as the hockey mom and a pig with a lipstick, Sarah Palin!

That idiot had no sense of how the world ticks or even basic education that other countries demand of their leaders.

And Joe the Plumber as the icon of American people!

So, such a country sure requires some foreign brains to keep them on even keel!

Whatever the US has achieved after the Monroe Doctrine is through immigrant brains!

And they also want illegal Mexicans too to engine their economy!

That is why it is a cauldron of confused nationhood!

And that is why they survive!
very smart. that's how they run the 21st century empire.
 

Ray

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very smart. that's how they run the 21st century empire.
and cover their weakness up by taking the high moral stand that they are a 'Land of Immigrants' and a 'Land of Opportunities'.

Opportunities, I will concede, are many out there so long as you don't stand on your birth and class.
 

thethinker

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Looks like someone is drumming up anti-Russia rhetorics by making deliberately controversial statements.

Maybe due to a drop in approval ratings by American citizens?



 

CCP

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Russia could do much better than that and draw most attention from US.
 

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