NY Times Square bomb attempt

AirforcePilot

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Feds Arrest 3, Possibly Tied To Bomb Plot

Federal authorities have arrested three men living in the greater Boston area in connection with the attempted Times Square bombing, Fox News has learned.

FBI and Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents on Thursday morning executed search warrants in "several locations in the Northeast," a statement from ICE said.

At least one of the federal raids was in Watertown, Mass., a Boston suburb. Search warrants related to the case were also executed in Camden County, N.J., and on Long Island in New York.

Authorities are looking into whether the Boston-area men, at least two of them from Pakistan, and others may have had any role in the Times Square plot or any prior knowledge of it.

"These raids are the logical next step in the investigation, after gathering preliminary information to ascertain where money may have come from," one source said. "We're trying to figure out where [the main suspect] got money from, and these are potential sources of that money."

But, the source said, the Boston-area men may have "unwittingly assisted in some capacity." In fact, the source said, the main suspect in the case, 30-year-old Faisal Shahzad, may have duped the men into providing money, but authorities are not ruling out anything at this point.

The searches are "the product of evidence that has been gathered in the investigation subsequent to the attempted Times Square bombing," ICE spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said in the statement.

Specifically, one source said, the search warrants are the product of information obtained through interrogations of Shahzad, who has now been charged with five federal offenses, including attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction.

Officials said the searches "do not relate to any known immediate threat to the public or active plot against the United States."

The Boston-area men have been arrested on "administrative charges," which means federal authorities will not advise them of Miranda rights to question them, as is required in criminal cases.

Republicans on Capitol Hill have criticized the Obama administration for "Mirandizing" suspects during several recent terrorism investigations.

One of the men arrested Thursday has been charged with overstaying his visa, and another, identified as Pir Khan, has been charged with staying in the country despite an order of removal, according to one source. The third man was also arrested for alleged immigration violations, a source said.

In a 2002 case in South Carolina, a Pakistani man named Pirdad Khan was ordered to leave the United States after pleading guilty to entering the United States illegally and "concealment of facts."

It's unclear if the 2002 case is related to the latest arrests.

Federal authorities have not ruled out bringing criminal charges against the Boston-area men in the future.

Asked whether any more arrests could be expected on Thursday, one law enforcement official declined to comment.

"We will use every resource available to make sure that anyone found responsible, whether they be in the United States or overseas, is held accountable," Attorney General Eric Holder told lawmakers on Thursday. "This is an on-going investigation and ... we are actively pursuing all those who were involved in it."
http://www.foxnews.com/
 

ajtr

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U.S. problem in one word: Pakistan​

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By JOEL BRINKLEY
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Published: Thursday, May. 13, 2010 - 5:11 am
Here we go again with Pakistan. This isn't deja vu. No, it's now a routine pattern in modern life: An Islamic fundamentalist trains in Pakistan and then flies to America or another Western state to wreak havoc.

Look back decades. Ramzi Yousef, the 1993 World Trade Center bomber, was born of Pakistan parents in Kuwait and trained for the attack in Pakistan.
Ramzi Bin al-Shibh, the Yemeni suspected of coordinating the Sept. 11 attack, was arrested the next year in Pakistan. Several men involved in the London train bombings five years ago trained in Pakistan. So did Richard Reed, the shoe bomber.

Last year, FBI agents in New York charged Najibullah Zazi and his father with planning a terror attack in the United States after receiving extensive training in bomb making and terrorist strategies in a Pakistani camp.

The litany of attempted and actual terror attacks offers at least half-a-dozen similar examples from Pakistan in recent years, and now comes the latest: Faisal Shahzad, the failed Times Square bomber, who trained in terror in his native country - Pakistan.
How did this come to be? Syria, Libya, Algeria, Egypt ... many similar states are home to millions of people who hate the United States. None of them - in fact no other country, anywhere - so regularly sends miscreants to America. What makes Pakistan "special"?

The common historical explanation lays blame in part on the United States for encouraging Pakistanis to fight the Soviet troops in Afghanistan during the 1980s. That probably played a role; it gave Pakistanis a taste of jihad. But I believe the Pakistani government holds the most responsibility.

Why? Pakistan is one of those countries - and there are more of them than you might think - whose government does absolutely nothing for its people, except require the payment of taxes and bribes. It offers virtually no social services, and the society is so stratified that it falls into a de facto class structure, much like neighboring India, from which Pakistan was born more 60 years ago. Two-thirds of the nation's people live in the provinces, and they are the "underclass" - ignored by Islamabad, except when they are abused. Medical care is virtually non-existent. And schools, a Pakistani children's advocacy society declared last month, "suffer from the worst forms of negligence, indifference and apathy." The government spends 1 percent of its budget on health-care services, 2 percent on education.

Much of the world is governed by leaders who do not see offering public works as part of their responsibility. The expectation that government will offer social services is a relatively recent phenomenon, and then only in developed countries. How much did the federal government do for Americans 100 years ago?

The result in Pakistan is that the vast majority of people are poor and uneducated. Only about one-third of boys make it past elementary school and just over one-quarter of the girls. The average per-capita income is just over $900 a year, a figure that would be far lower if the state's multi-millionaire oligarches did not inflate the average.

UNICEF says 42 percent of the state's children are so malnourished that they suffer from stunting, meaning they are not growing, physically or mentally. Forty-two percent! The damage is permanent. So when children grow up, generally they are poorly educated, and almost half of them have "stunted" intellects. All of them are still aware enough to breath in the anti-American ethos that animates Pakistani society. And right now, 44 percent of Pakistan's population is under 18. In this group is the next generation of angry, violent extremists.

We've all seen movies or read books depicting smooth-talking mullahs in Islamic countries recruiting young men for terror groups. Pakistan is the model for this. There, children who agree to be recruited win new respect from their friends. In many cases what choice do they have? Job prospects range from weak to non-existent.

"If you have lost faith in the state," said Adil Najam of Boston University, who writes the blog All Things Pakistan, "anyone who comes along and offers you a glorious future, that is very attractive."

I've said it before, and I'll say it again. America's problem is not Afghanistan. The problem is Pakistan. As Daniel Markey, a former senior State Department official, told Congress: "The United States should shift its strategic focus not just from Iraq to Afghanistan, not just to link Afghanistan and Pakistan, but to go one step further and place Pakistan at the center of our strategic concerns."



Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/13/2747783/us-problem-in-one-word-pakistan.html#ixzz0npUp8rSN
 

DaRk WaVe

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U.S. problem in one word: Pakistan

ROFL, Americans just hate us, isn't it?
 
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ajtr

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^^No emo you r wrongAmericans dont hate they care for you read the article carefully dont get carried away by heading.
 

nandu

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Shahzad used hawala system to fund terror plot

South Asians often use an informal network of brokers, called "hawala," to transfer money over long distances when it is too inconvenient or dangerous to send cash by courier.

The centuries-old system is used to move billions of dollars in and out of countries like Pakistan, Afghanistan and Somalia – often to the chagrin of U.S. law enforcement.

A law enforcement official said that terror suspect Faisal Shahzad is believed to have tapped into such a network to help fund a plot to detonate a car bomb in Times Square. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.

Authorities say three men helped get money to Shahzad although they might not have known how the money was going to be used.

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/shahzad-used-hawala-system-to-fund-terror-plot/618867/
 

Solid Beast

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Even though it's obvious Pakistan has a terror problem long unsolved and sponsored by outside as well, I would not fully trust what either the U.S. or Pakistan have to say about sh**. We all know the U.S. government's brain gets fried every 4-8 years so memories run short. They went to Afghanistan for a reason, it wasn't just about personal revenge for 9/11 it had to do with allowing such governments to exist. Even though I applaud ISAF, the Taliban were ignored for a long time by the US and fed by Pakistan and at the same time the US never questioned Pakistan about their Taliban support and looked the other way, just because they helped against the Soviets. They can't do anything about Pakistani terror because it will further expose their own shortcomings. Why was terror allowed to be fomented this long? How much military aid was given in what time period? These real questions will hurt and Obama nor Clinton have the balls to answer.

Help us Jesus, Jewish God, Allah, Tom Cruise use your witchcraft on them to keep the fire off us all. Help us Oprah Winnefrey.
 
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Oracle

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/\/\/\ Agreed. But it's high time someone from both US and Pakistan take responsibility of what is happening now. The more they shy away from this problem, the more this monster is going to get strong. It is for the interest of both US and Pakistan that they should act, and act now.
 

ajtr

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SB,
Taliban were neglected for a reason by usa...The reason being they fits in usa equation of geopolitics...USA went into Afghanistan to draw revenge as u said but it always was searching for reasons to attack iraq again since 1990s and 9/11 provided that reason to usa.That the only reason i still maintained that WOT was the biggest farce pulled up by usa on the world.
 

ajtr

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For Car Bomb Suspect, a Long Path to Times Square


Just after midnight on Feb. 25, 2006, Faisal Shahzad sent a lengthy e-mail message to a group of friends. The trials of his fellow Muslims weighed on him — the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the plight of Palestinians, the publication in Denmark of cartoons lampooning the Prophet Muhammad.

Mr. Shahzad was wrestling with how to respond. He understood the notion that Islam forbids the killing of innocents, he wrote. But to those who insist only on "peaceful protest," he posed a question: "Can you tell me a way to save the oppressed? And a way to fight back when rockets are fired at us and Muslim blood flows?

"Everyone knows how the Muslim country bows down to pressure from west. Everyone knows the kind of humiliation we are faced with around the globe."

Yet by some measures, Mr. Shahzad — a Pakistani immigrant who was then 26 years old — seemed to be thriving in the West. He worked as a financial analyst at Elizabeth Arden, the global cosmetics firm. He had just received his green card, making him a legal resident in the United States. He owned a gleaming new house in Shelton, Conn. His Pakistani-American wife would soon become pregnant with their first child, whom they named Alisheba, or "beautiful sunshine."

Four years later, Mr. Shahzad stands accused of planting a car bomb in Times Square on a balmy spring evening. After his arrest two days later, on May 3, while trying to flee to Dubai, the few details that surfaced about his life echoed a familiar narrative about radicalization in the West: his anger toward his adopted country seemed to have grown in lockstep with his personal struggles. He had lost his home to foreclosure last year. At the same time he was showing signs of a profound, religiously infused alienation.

But the roots of Mr. Shahzad's militancy appear to have sprouted long before, according to interviews with relatives, friends, classmates, neighbors, colleagues and government officials, as well as e-mail messages written by Mr. Shahzad that were obtained by The New York Times. His argument with American foreign policy grew after 9/11, even as he enjoyed America's financial promise and expansive culture. He balanced these dueling emotions with an agility common among his Pakistani immigrant friends.

As Mr. Shahzad became more religious, starting around 2006, he was also turning away from the Pakistan of his youth, friends recalled, distancing himself from the liberal, elite world of his father, Bahar ul-Haq, a retired vice marshal in the Pakistani Air Force.

And while in recent years Mr. Shahzad struggled to pay his bills, it is unclear that his financial hardship played a significant role in his radicalization. He still owned his home and held a full-time job when he began signaling to friends that he wanted to leave the United States.

In April 2009, the same month Mr. Shahzad got his United States citizenship, he sent an e-mail message to friends that foreshadowed his militant destiny. He criticized the views of a moderate Pakistani politician, writing, "I bet when it comes to defending the lands, his opinion would be we should do dialogue." The politician had "bought into the Western jargon" of calling the mujahedeen, or foreign fighters, "extremist," wrote Mr. Shahzad, who urged the recipients of the message to find "a proper Sheikh to understand the Quran."

One of the recipients responded by asking Mr. Shahzad which sheikhs he followed.

Writing in Urdu, Mr. Shahzad replied, "My sheikhs are in the field." A few months later, he abruptly quit his job and left for Pakistan, where, officials say, he was later trained in bomb-making by the Pakistani Taliban.

But precisely what combination of influences — political, religious and personal — drove Mr. Shahzad to violence remains a mystery, even to those close to him.

"We all know these things, what the geopolitical problems are," said Mr. Shahzad's father-in-law, M. A. Mian, 55. "Every day we sit in our living rooms with our friends and we discuss these issues." "But to go to this extreme, this is unbelievable," he said, adding: "He has lovely children. Two really lovely children. As a father I would not be able to afford to lose my children.

Military Upbringing

Faisal Shahzad grew up somewhat rootless. He identified proudly with his tribal Pashtun heritage, yet knew little of his father's ancestral village, Mohib Banda, a collection of mud huts ringed by sugar and wheat fields in northwestern Pakistan. Mr. Shahzad's father, Mr. Haq, had entered the Pakistani Air Force as a common airman before climbing the ranks as a fighter pilot who excelled at midair acrobatics, with posts in England and Saudi Arabia.

By the time Mr. Shahzad was 12, his father had been transferred from Jidda, Saudi Arabia, to the Pakistani city of Quetta, followed by Rawalpindi. As the son of a senior military officer, Mr. Shahzad was swaddled in privilege, tended to by chauffeurs, servants and armed guards in an insular world made up almost exclusively of military families. Mr. Shahzad's household was a blend of strict and liberal; Mr. Haq, who spoke British-accented English and drank alcohol socially, was stern with his children and quick to anger, friends and former colleagues recalled.

When Mr. Shahzad entered high school in the mid-1990s, his family had settled in Karachi, a throbbing mega-city in the south. By then, Pakistan had plunged into chaos. As political instability and sectarian violence roiled the country, many Pakistanis blamed the United States. After propping up the Pakistani military dictator, Gen. Mohammad Zia ul-Haq, in the 1980s, the American government was now imposing hefty sanctions in retaliation for Pakistan's nuclear program. The economy stalled as anti-Americanism spread.

Mr. Shahzad came of age during Pakistan's state-sponsored jihad against India's military in the breakaway region of Kashmir — a conflict that granted legendary status to Pakistani jihadists. "We used to see the mujahedeen as heroes," said one graduate of Mr. Shahzad's high school, who, like others interviewed for this article, spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retribution. "When I look back, I think, 'What was I thinking? What were we all doing?' But in that era, it made sense. We all wanted to do something."

It is unclear how formative these events were for Mr. Shahzad, who continued to lead a somewhat sheltered existence, living with his family in a neighborhood of stately homes fringed by palm trees and bougainvillea. His school, located on a military base, taught the same rigid curriculum — with an anti-Western slant and a strict form of Islamic studies — imposed nationally by General Zia.

After graduating, Mr. Shahzad enrolled in Greenwich University, a business school in Karachi known for drawing affluent underachievers with fancy cars. Mr. Shahzad proved a mediocre student. (In high school, he had gotten D's in English composition and microeconomics, according to a transcript.) But what he lacked in academic prowess he made up for in ambition, friends recalled; he was determined to finish his degree in the United States. Taking advantage of a partnership between his college and the University of Bridgeport, in Connecticut, Mr. Shahzad applied for a student visa.

On Jan. 16, 1999, at the age of 19, Mr. Shahzad left Pakistan for a new life in America.

Driven to Success

The wide, maple-shaded streets leading to the University of Bridgeport seem a long way from Karachi. The quiet, tidy campus overlooks a tranquil stretch of the Long Island Sound, where ferries pass in the distance.

When Mr. Shahzad started classes there, more than a third of the college's students were foreigners — 15 of them from Pakistan. Mr. Shahzad stood out. He walked with a confident air, showing off his gym-honed muscles in tight T-shirts. He carried the air of a privileged upbringing, coming off as aloof and, at times, snobbish. While the Pakistani students stuck together, playing cricket and collecting free meals at the campus mosque, Mr. Shahzad had a wider circle of friends and a fuller social calendar. A skilled cook, he drew students to his dorm room with the scent of his simmering lobia, a Pakistani lentil dish. He worked out obsessively and, on weekends, hit New York City's Bengali-theme nightclubs. He loved women, recalled a former classmate, and "could drink anyone under the table." He showed little interest in Islam. Mr. Shahzad rarely seemed pressed for cash — he had a large television in his dorm room and drove a Mitsubishi Galant. But he still looked for work. Nimble with his hands — he would later take to gardening and painting — he landed a job designing intricate gold pendants for a jeweler at a mall in Milford. While Mr. Shahzad did not seem to distinguish himself academically, he came across as witty, street smart and "fast on his feet," recalled one classmate. He and his Pakistani peers were chasing the same dream, the classmate said: "Back then, it was all about fast cars and becoming something."

While Mr. Shahzad seemed eager to carve out a life in his host country, his anger at America flared early. The classmate recalled walking into Mr. Shahzad's apartment a few days after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 to find him staring at news footage of the planes hitting the towers.

"They had it coming," Mr. Shahzad said, according to the friend, a Pakistani-American. The friend said Mr. Shahzad believed that Western countries had conspired to mistreat Muslims. "He would just go off," said the friend, adding that he paid little heed to Mr. Shahzad's eruptions, dismissing them as a product of his fierce Pashtun pride.

"He was always saying, 'If these people come to my land, it's not going to be good,' " the friend recalled.

By late 2001, Mr. Shahzad seemed focused on his American future. Having graduated from the University of Bridgeport with a bachelor's degree in computer applications and information systems, he was working as a clerk for Elizabeth Arden in Stamford. The following year, while holding the same job, Mr. Shahzad began taking night courses at the University of Bridgeport's business school. He had bought a black Mercedes, as well as a $205,000 condominium in Norwalk. Two years later, Mr. Shahzad sold the apartment at a $56,000 profit.

His broker, Keven Courbois, was struck by Mr. Shahzad's sense of responsibility, given that he was only 25. "I thought it was great: Look at this guy who is handling a condo on his own," Mr. Courbois said.

At times, Mr. Shahzad seemed deeply frustrated with his job at Elizabeth Arden, complaining to a friend that the company never raised his $50,000 salary. (The company declined to discuss Mr. Shahzad's employment.)

In July 2004, three months after selling his condo, Mr. Shahzad bought the gray, two-story house in Shelton, in a quiet, hilly neighborhood of well-tended flower beds and rambling older homes. He was preparing for marriage. His parents agreed on a suitable match: Huma Mian, an ebullient 23-year-old from Denver who had recently graduated with a degree in accounting, and whose Pakistani-American father was a prominent oil industry engineer and economist.

On Dec. 25, 2004, they held a lavish wedding in Peshawar, Mr. Shahzad's ancestral turf, celebrating with a rare touch of modernity: the women and men danced together.

Mr. Shahzad's "bachelor days" were behind him, the former classmate recalled. He was ready to settle down.

New Religiosity

Two years later, when Mr. Shahzad wrote the e-mail message telling friends that Muslims must defend themselves from "foreign infidel forces," he seemed to be living a stable suburban life. That June, he took a new job as an analyst at the Affinion Group, a financial marketing firm in Norwalk, telling a friend that his annual income had jumped to $70,000. Two months later, he finished his master's degree in business. On weekends, Mr. Shahzad hosted barbecues, mowed his lawn and played badminton in the yard. His wife was pregnant. Mr. Shahzad had long been critical of American foreign policy. "He was always very upset about the fabrication of the W.M.D. stunt to attack Iraq and killing noncombatants such as the sons and grandson of Saddam Hussein," said a close relative. In 2003, Mr. Shahzad had been copied on a Google Groups e-mail message bearing photographs of Guantánamo Bay detainees, handcuffed and crouching, below the words "Shame on you, Bush. Shame on You." The following year, Igor Djuric, a real estate agent who helped him buy his house, recalled that Mr. Shahzad was angered by President George W. Bush and the war in Iraq. If anything struck Mr. Shahzad's friends and family as different, it was his new religiosity. He no longer drank, and was praying five times a day, stopping into mosques in Stamford, Norwalk and Bridgeport. Some of his friends thought nothing of it; plenty of Pakistani immigrants went through more spiritual phases. What set Mr. Shahzad apart, they said, was not his Islamic devotion, but the particular religious frame through which he had begun to interpret world events.

His 2006 e-mail message echoed the same arguments found on militant Internet forums: that the West is at war with Islam, and Muslims are suffering humiliation because they have strayed from their religious duty to fight back.

"The crusade has already started against Islam and Muslims with cartoons of our beloved Prophet," wrote Mr. Shahzad, who went on to quote verses from the Koran as proof of what "Allah commands about fighting for Islam."

During casual conversations with friends, Mr. Shahzad had taken to citing Islamic theology. He was a fan of Ibn Taymiyyah, a 14th-century scholar who inspired a puritanical following, and Abul Ala Mawdudi, a chief architect of the Islamic revival and founder of Pakistan's largest Islamic political party, Jamaat-e-Islami.

On visits home, Mr. Shahzad began to clash with his father.

Mr. Haq had long been wary of political Islam, and found his son's evolution troubling, friends recalled in interviews. The scrutiny went both ways. Mr. Shahzad glared when Mr. Haq once asked him to fetch water to mix with his whiskey, a family friend recalled. "He wanted to change his father," said the classmate.

By late 2008, Mr. Shahzad seemed to oscillate between contentment and frustration. He doted on his two small children, even changing diapers to the amazement of his more patriarchal relatives. But he felt demeaned at work, complaining of a manager who used to "insult him," a close relative recalled. He felt that American Muslims were treated differently after 9/11, said the classmate.

"He used to say that when they refer to us, they say 'Americans of Pakistani origin' — they don't say 'Americans with German origin,' " the relative recalled. "These kinds of things, they were all the time cooking in his head."

During a visit to Pakistan in 2008, Mr. Shahzad gave perhaps the clearest indication yet that he was heading down a militant path. He asked his father for permission to fight in Afghanistan, friends of the father and the relative recalled. Mr. Haq denied the request and appealed to the friends for help in managing his son, they said.

The following year brought a turning point. Back in Connecticut, Mr. Shahzad told his former classmate that he was ready to leave the United States. He was tired of his commute. He found it stressful to keep up mortgage payments on a single income, even though he had urged his wife not to work, said Dr. M. Saud Anwar, a pulmonologist in Connecticut who shares acquaintances with Mr. Shahzad.

"He was like, 'Why am I paying so much for everything — why am I even here?' " the classmate recalled.

As time went on, Mr. Shahzad's pride kept him from asking for money from either his family or his wife's, according to a close relative and the classmate. His plan was to wait until he became an American citizen, so he could find lucrative work with an American company in the Middle East and live among Muslims, the classmate recalled. Mr. Shahzad got his citizenship on April 17, 2009. That same month, he sent the e-mail message to friends saying that his "sheikhs are in the field." (Dr. Anwar provided portions of the e-mail message, which he obtained from Mr. Shahzad's friend, to The Times and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.)

Return to Pakistan

Over the next few months, Mr. Shahzad and his wife held yard sales. The marriage appeared to be strained; Mr. Shahzad was pressuring his wife to wear a hijab, Dr. Anwar said. He also insisted that the family return to Pakistan while he searched for a job in the Middle East; his wife wanted him to find the job first, recalled the close relative.

On June 2, Mr. Shahzad called his wife from Kennedy Airport. He said that he was leaving for Pakistan, and that it was her choice whether she wanted to follow him, the relative recalled. Ms. Mian refused. Later that month, she packed up her children and moved to Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, where her parents were living.

Mr. Shahzad stayed with his parents in Peshawar. He appears to have stopped paying his mortgage; the bank foreclosed on his Connecticut home in September. One month later, at a family gathering in Peshawar, Mr. Shahzad seemed angered by the American-led drone strikes along the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan, a close friend said. He was "condemning the attacks and the government for not doing anything about it," the friend said.

Mr. Haq was reassured about his son's plans when Mr. Shahzad agreed to start working in the family's farming business. "He bluffed them," said one of the father's friends. In December, he left home, saying he would be back in a couple of days, the relative recalled. He never returned.

By then, according to federal investigators, Mr. Shahzad had set himself on a course to attack Times Square.

When he returned to the United States on Feb. 3, he circled back to his first days in America. Looking for work, he dropped by to see the jeweler who had hired him in college. He took out a lease on a small apartment just miles from the university campus. His movements over the next few months remain largely a mystery.

Last week, his landlord, Stanislaw Chomiak, walked through Mr. Shahzad's apartment, pointing out the spot where he had been building a wooden replica of a mosque. He looked around, as if searching for clues. Mr. Shahzad had been nice, pleasant — a perfect kind of tenant. He had even lined the burners of the stove with aluminum so they would not get tarnished.

"Where are you going to find a guy like this?" the landlord said. "Nice guy and look what happens."
 
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ajtr

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E-Mail From Faisal Shahzad






My Beloved and Peaceful Ummah



From: faisal shahzad ([email protected])

Sent: Sat 2/25/06 12:05 AM

To: [email protected]



AoAwRwB,



If something from what I wrote doesn't correspond with Quran and Sunnah then I renounce it and I ask Allah's forgiveness due to my ignorance.



17 year old Mohammad bin Qasam attacked the Sub-continent Pak-o-Hind and defeated infidel ruler Raja Dahir because there came to him news of a Muslim women who was raped!!! and today our beloved Prophet (Katimun Nabieen Mohammad al-Ameen) PBUH has been disrespected and disgraced in the whole world and we just sit and watch with shame and sorrow and most of us don't even care.



80:18. "From what thing did He create him (man)?"



80:19. "From Nutfah (male and female semen drops) He created him, and then set him in due proportion"



We were nothing when our Lord created us, isn't our creation enough evidence that He will resurrect us again for the real world. What will your answer be to your Lord as to how much of Quran and Hadith you read, understood and followed? We deny it plainly and do nothing about it. He blesses us with many blessing and every time we thank God but do not follow His teachings. And if He tests us with hard time our heart hardened with bitterness towards Him rather than humiliating and starts questioning and blaming Allah.



100:6 Truly man is, to his Lord, ungrateful



Why do you have to follow Democracy (Human made Laws) if you're already given Laws revealed from Allah, Quran and Sunnah. Khilafath is what we Muslim ruled the world with, weren't we successful in world then? America, the source of democracy let's Pakistan rule by dictatorship?? Hello!!no... oh wait...... yeah, DAHHH..



Everyone knows the current situation of Muslim World. Everyone knows the kind of Hypocrite government in Muslim world. Everyone knows how the Muslim country bows down to pressure from west. Everyone knows the kind of humiliation we are faced with around the globe. And I hope that you also know how far we have gone astray from (Siratul Mustakeem) Straight Path (Quran and Sunnah). My friends it is all evident from Quran and Sunnah as to what happens to a nation when it fails to follow Gods revelation.



6:42. Verily, We sent (Messengers) to many nations before you (0 Muhammad ). And We seized them with extreme poverty (or loss in wealth) and loss in health with calamities so that they might believe with humility.



6:43. When Our Torment reached them, why then did they not believe with humility? But their hearts became hardened, and Shaitan (Satan) made fairseeming to them that which they used to do.



6:44. So, when they forgot (the warning) with which they had been reminded, We opened to them the gates of every (pleasant) thing, until in the midst of their enjoyment in that which they were given, all of a sudden, We took them to punishment, and lo! They were plunged into destruction with deep regrets and sorrows.



It is with no doubt that we today Muslim, followers of Islam are attacked and occupied by foreign infidel forces. The crusade has already started against Islam and Muslims with cartoons of our beloved Prophet PBUH as War drums. We all know that most of our Ummah is ignorant of Islam or illiterate of Quran and Sunnah. Quran and Sunnah is our very base and purpose of creation in this world. Most of us get confused with current wars when we try to make logic with our worldly knowledge. Have you every try to look at with Allah's prospective, do you try to read and understand Quran? Except for just clinging to one excuse that Islam does not allow innocent killings? Not saying that it is right, But we are not sure of who does that either? It might be US. A fighter who gives his life to Allah can never disobey His commands. Friends with peaceful protest! Can you tell me a way to save the oppressed? And a way to fight back when rockets are fired at us and Muslim blood flows? In Palestine, Afghan, Iraq, Chechnya and else where. We don't know the realities on ground as to what the Mujahideen goes through but you would have to agree to the fact that there is a force out there that is fighting the west and is defeating them.



8:39 And fight them on until there is no more tumult or oppression, and there prevail justice and faith in Allah altogether and everywhere; but if they cease, verily Allah doth see all that they do.



8:73 The Unbelievers are protectors, one of another: Unless ye do this, (protect each other), there would be tumult and oppression on earth, and great mischief.



My beloved and peaceful Ummah majority of us think that we are too weak against the west or foreign forces. If you think we are too weak against the west. Then our Prophet PBUH wouldn't have fought Badar (313 vs. 1000) or Uhad(700 vs. 3000) or Khandaq (3000 vs. 10,000) against Kufar and Mushriqeen. Isn't that an excellent example for Muslims? Why didn't the Prophet (PBUH) use Logic or was it TRUST in Allah, Why didn't He (PBUH) preached the sahabas to get educated first and then become an economic power or become rich with many horses and then fight? Where will the help from God come if you were of equal power? Something ones with weak faith fail to understand. Afghanistan-Russian war is a clear example in our lives and so will be Iraq, wherever the help is coming from it continues to come in the favor of believer and the fighters, who scarifies their lives, who have a little bit of honor left in their hearts, who fight for Haq, for truth, for Islam, for Muslim land or in the name of Islam. People following logic cannot understand Faith. Here is what Allah commands about Fighting for Islam. No one can scarifies ones life unless the one who believe in resurrection and see Allah in front of them.



4:74. Let those (believers) who sell the life of this world for the Hereafter fight in the Cause of Allah, and whoso fights in the Cause of Allah, and is killed or gets victory, We shall bestow on him a great reward.



4:75. And what is wrong with you that you fight not in the Cause of Allah, and for those weak, ill-treated and oppressed among men, women, and children, whose cry is: "Our Lord! Rescue us from this town whose people are oppressors; and raise for us from You one who will protect, and raise for us from You one who will help."



4:76. Those who believe, fight in the Cause of Allah, and those who lives for the Cause of Allah. Those! They are the truthful.



We prostrate world because our parents and society prostrate them before us and expect the same for us. We believe in this world and our parents and not Allah. Believing is following by shown actions. Because how much of Allah's revelation we follow? Nothing except for a couple of prayers. Jews and Christine prays more than us. What differentiate us from them? They believe in Lord of universe too. We can only differentiate from Jews and Christine's if we follow our Book completely or else we are no better than them.



So strive my peaceful Ummah. Strive to bring Khilafath (Laws of Allah). See what's around you? Think for a while, why was a Prophet sent? Why is this humiliation? Why was Quran revealed to you? What's in Quran. All your loved ones and all your riches are a test for you. Does your heart still pumps or is it dead?



9:23. O you who believe! Take not for Auliya' (supporters and helpers) your fathers and your brothers if they prefer disbelief to Belief. And whoever of you does so, then he is one of the Zalimiln (wrong-doers, etc.).



9:24. Say: If your fathers, your sons, your brothers, your wives, your kindred, the wealth that you have gained, the commerce in which you fear a decline, and the dwellings in which you delight ... are dearer to you than Allah and His Messenger, and striving hard and fighting in His Cause , then wait until Allah brings about His Decision (torment). And Allah guides not the people who are Al-Fasiclan (the rebellious, disobedient to Allah).



80:33. Then, when there comes As-Sakhkhah (the Day of Resurrection's second blowing of Trumpet),



80:34. That Day shall a man flee from his brother,



80:35. And from his mother and his father,



80:36. And from his wife and his children.



80:37. Everyman, that Day, will have enough to make him careless of others.



May Allah Open our hearts and fill it with true faith and believes.

Wsalaam

Faisal-
 

ajtr

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Gosh!!!! he has so much patience to type 3 page email...really commendable job....
 

ajtr

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Late-Night Political Jokes-David Letterman,Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel :)

David Letterman

"The State Department now has warned against travel to the tribal regions of Pakistan. There goes my summer vacation."
Yeah, they plucked a guy off a plane. His name is Faisal Shahzad. They say he was a moody loner. Last year, he vacationed in the tribal regions of Pakistan. Well, no red flags there.
"But there is some good news for Faisal Shahzad. Today he was told that he made the Taliban blooper reel."
Jay Leno

"Well, this Faisal Shahzad managed to get on the plane because the airline workers used an out of date do not fly list. But the good news? There is no way Lee Harvey Oswald was getting on that plane, I'll tell you that."
"Folks, we're starting to learn more and more about that man arrested in the New York SUV car bombing case. His name is Faisal Shahzad. He's from Pakistan. What tipped off the authorities he might be the bomber? His name is Faisal Shahzad. He's from Pakistan.
His name is Faisal Shahzad. What, is Snoop Dogg naming terrorists now? They're still looking for his brother, Fo Shizzle. They don't know where he is.
Anyway, it turns out this Faisal Shahzad has got a Facebook page. We looked it up. Let's see who his friends are. Look, bin Laden, Ahmadinejad and Danny Bonaduce. What are his favorite activities? What have we got there? We got beach volleyball, rollerblading. Look, blowing up Nissan Pathfinders.
Jimmy Kimmel

Hey, it turns out the prime suspect in the failed attempt to bomb Times Square is not the brightest. They figured out the events leading up to Saturday. First, Faisal Shahzad buys an SUV off Craigslist, using a traceable email, and fills it with, basically, wedding sparklers. Then he drives two different cars into New York — the one with the bomb in it and a getaway car. He plants the bomb but leaves the keys to the getaway car in the car with the bomb in it. So he has to take the subway home. And then, once he gets home, he realizes he also left the key to his apartment in the SUV with the bomb in it, and has to get his landlord to let him in. If this isn't the work of a stoner, I don't know what is.
Authorities say Faisal Shahzad, the Times Square bombing suspect, used the wrong kind of fertilizer, which is what happens when you don't watch Martha Stewart.
It was reported that Shahzad went to terrorist camp in Pakistan. Honestly, who are these parents that are sending their kids to terrorist camp?
 

ajtr

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Pakistan: Reactions To The Time Square Bomber


Earlier this month an attempted Bomb attack at the Time Square in New York City raised security alerts across USA. Following the attack the Police detained Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistani-American, from JFK airport in connection to the bombing. According to the reports, Shahzad's car was found in the heart of Times Square loaded with gasoline, propane, fireworks and fertilizer.

His arrest has been been followed by frequent raids, more arrests and further investigations which raised much speculations and triggered a debate on US-Pakistan relations. While the media and authorities continue to question the possibilities of more terrorist attempts, many in Pakistan feel targeted. Blogger Ammar Yasir relates the incident to US visa policies and the effect of terrorist attacks on US-Pakistan relations:

The Pakistani tragedy is that we all are scrutinized for the crimes we never committed. Statically speaking more Pakistanis are the victim of terrorism than any American for that matter. Our army has been more effective against the Taliban than US and NATO forces combine in Afghanistan. US Govt. has more power to enforce their will on the Pakistani than the voters who elected the Govt. American drones fly in Pakistani air space, bomb down Pakistani houses and land safely on Pakistani bases. Still, our seriousness is questioned, our loyalty to the cause is inquired and our fate is decided on the basis of some Hollywood movie.

Kalsoom Lakhani at CHUP gives possible solutions:

Faisal Shahzad may be a Pakistani-American, but he was not only "Made in Pakistan." Yes, Pakistan is plagued with a vast number of issues. We have an undeniable terror problem. But the right solution in this case is to have both countries – the U.S. and Pakistan – look inward at their own societies and take responsibility for the issues at hand.

A blogpost titled "Who is Faisal Shahzad" by Adil Najam on All Things Pakistan, takes a look at Shahzad's life demanding to view and understand the situation beyond stereotypes:

Let us not shy away from the tough questions that we need to ask ourselves. But let us also not be more tough on ourselves than we need to be. Let us work very hard to understand how someone from amongst us could even contemplate such a horrible act. But let us not let the horribleness of this contemplation lead to the condemnation of an entire community. Let us understand him for what he is accused of being: a criminal; let us condemn him for what is charged with having done: criminality; but let us not allow his alleged criminality with our own identity.

Shahzad's arrest and the aftermath has raised fears amongst Pakistani's living abroad and in Pakistan. News reports regarding his possible connections to groups in Pakistan is not comforting. Needless to say, the incident has raised tensions and has put Pakistan in the spotlight once again. Perhaps, as Lakhani puts it, its about time the two countries sat together and took responsibility in order to find a sustainable solution and device a strategy to combat terrorism.
 

ajtr

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Opinion: On Being Pakistani


ISLAMABAD (May 16) -- Pakistanis are becoming the world's pariahs. Since being implicated in a steady stream of violent attacks -- from the London Tube bombings in 2005 to this month's failed attempt to bomb Times Square -- it seems almost inevitable now that when the next act of terrorism happens, a Pakistani will be involved.

As a Canadian of Pakistani descent, I've watched this pattern emerge with a rising sense of trepidation. Thirty-five years ago, when my parents decided to move to Canada, things were much different. Pakistanis were different. They were much in demand -- an intelligent, hard-working people who integrated and contributed positively to society, wherever they went.

What a terrible journey we've made since then.

Today, Pakistanis are objects of fear and suspicion. Wherever we go we must contend with the "terrorist" label and endure the scrutiny that accompanies it. Like many of my compatriots, I've been "interviewed" by the Joint Terrorism Task Force at the U.S. border, questioned at Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi airport and scrutinized with extra efficiency by a German border control officer. Every time it happens, a piece of advice a Sufi in Saudi Arabia once gave me cycles through my mind: "When an obstacle is placed in front of you," he said, "be like water -- flow around it."

Pakistanis are being asked to flow a lot these days, and it will not get better any time soon. Many people in the world must be asking why it is that so many acts of terrorism in the West seem to lead back to Pakistan. Is there something in the Pakistani psyche that makes them susceptible to violence?

What those people might be surprised to hear is that Pakistanis are asking the same questions.

At the forefront is something quite basic: How did this happen? How, in 30 years -- a mere generation -- have Pakistanis gone from being desirable to becoming undesirables?

The standard narrative goes something like this: During the 1980s, the U.S. promoted violent jihad in Pakistan to create a proxy army to fight against the godless Soviets in Afghanistan. The Americans funded the growth of jihad ideology, encouraged the construction of madrasas -- religious seminaries that have now become militant birthing grounds -- and are now fighting the jihadists they helped to create, including Osama bin Laden.

But there is another side to the story. After Soviet troops withdrew from Afghanistan, Pakistan's military establishment decided to continue using the jihadists as proxies, both in Afghanistan and in Kashmir. That cold-hearted act of realpolitik was inspired by a neo-Cold War mentality in which India was -- and still is -- viewed as an existential threat to Pakistan.

Most Pakistanis feel that America has brought war on them, a war no one here wanted and which is ultimately killing Pakistanis. But for me, and for a silent minority of Pakistanis as well, there is an alarming lack of recognition of the role played by Pakistan's own armed forces and intelligence agencies in sending Pakistan down the road to jihad.

There are two reasons for this. First, for decades, Pakistan's generals have diligently maintained the illusion that the army is the only reason Pakistan has not collapsed. Pakistanis are spoon-fed this false perception from childhood, indoctrinated into believing that the army is the Great Savior, the Protector, the Guardian.

Second, opposing the army can have dire consequences. The execution of former Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto in 1979 is one salient example. The mounting evidence of an army role in the December 2008 assassination of his daughter, Benazir Bhutto, is another.

Just a few days ago my uncle expressed his concern in connection with the work I was doing tracing Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad's militant connections back to groups linked to Pakistan's dreaded spy service, the ISI. "You don't understand these people," he warned me. "They can make you disappear and you will never be found again. No one can stand up to them."

But somebody must stand up to them. Pakistan's image in the world, not to mention its future, depends on it. Is it an accident that Faisal Shahzad was the son of a senior Pakistani military officer? I don't think so. Military culture in this country is virulently anti-American. Couple it with the rampant spread of jihad ideology -- also the product of the army's failed policies -- and you end up with a deadly mix.

The failed attack on Times Square is only the tip of the iceberg. The fear among many Pakistanis is that some similar attempt is likely to succeed. With each attack, fear and suspicion of any Pakistani is bound to rise. And the irony is that as Pakistan spirals into chaos, young people here are increasingly looking to get out.

Two of my cousins are waiting for their immigration papers to be approved in Canada. They are educated, moderate Pakistani Muslims, much like Shahzad appeared to be until recently. They worry now that the environment of fear will hamper their efforts for a better life abroad. My brother, a professor of biochemistry at Trinity College in Dublin, is planning a sabbatical to Harvard, but worries about the treatment he'll receive there.

Bearded Pakistanis have been under the microscope for years. Now, clean-shaven, Ray-Ban-wearing Pakistanis may be in for the same treatment. My advice to them is to listen to the Sufis. Self-respect lies within the self; no one can take it away from you. Be like water.
 

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(Cross posting)
An amateur bomber in New York
By Sami Shah

May 13, 2010

I am seriously upset with Faisal Shahzad. His amateurish attempts at terrorism are ruining Pakistan's image. It wasn't easy building a reputation as the top exporter of worldclass terrorists. The Middle East had that market cornered for most of the latter half of the last century (with the Venezuelans making a respectable bid for the title in the 70s with Carlos the Jackal). For a very long time, it seemed like the Arabs were the Apple computers of terrorism. They exported both quantity and quality.

When James Cameron finally recognised their efforts by casting generic Arabs as trouble-makers in True Lies, the rest of the world thought the game was over. The gold medal had gone to the Middle East. Then, like Usain Bolt breaking his own record, the Arab world produced Osama Bin Laden. He became an overnight sensation. Soon teens with terrorist aspirations had his posters up on their walls and his audio and video releases topped the charts. The sinister Saudi combined charisma with wealth, CIA training with Afghan tenacity. He turned the whole terrorism industry upside down, transforming it from a bloated bureaucracy rife with nepotism into a 21st century open source meritocracy.

That's when we Pakistani's made a legitimate grab for top slot. Aimal Kansi had made a good first impression on the judging committee, combining ingenuity and initiative as far back as 1993. Unfortunately for him, there was no follow up act.

Not this time though. Our terrorists worked hard. They took their jobs seriously and never complained. Long hours, terrible working conditions, constant travel, drone attacks and a Pakistani government that treated them with all the consistency of a schizophrenic with multiple personality disorder. Yet they persevered. Now, in 2010, we could finally say we were the envy of terrorists everywhere. With training institutes that churn out graduates who always make their instructors explode with pride, Celebrity terrorists who can return from the dead and a disregard for civilians that would make American Presidents envious, we had finally arrived. In 2010, if you wanted to be respected as a terrorist, you had better be from Pakistan. Just look at the number of international students our terrorist training institutes receive. Their admissions department must be flooded with applications. Whole teams of frustrated senior suicide-bombers spending hours pouring over personal statements. The Pakistani textile industry may be declining in terms of exports, our IT services may be crippled because of PayPal's refusal to acknowledge our existence, but dammit, we did terrorism right!

That is, until Faisal bloody Shahzad. You have to be a truly terrible terrorist when the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan refuses to acknowledge you. This is an organisation that is on the verge of claiming responsibility for the Hindenberg disaster and the Apollo 13 problems. They have, of course, since backtracked and claimed to have trained Faisal but even they don't sound like they believe themselves. It's more a case of trying to buy some brand presence on a new celebrity. Faisal, for his part, could not have done more damage to the terrorism industry if he visited Mullah Omar, Hakeemullah Mehsud and Osama bin Laden while wearing a tracking device that was pinging his GPRS coordinates to a drone flying directly overhead. His claims of having attended bomb-making classes in South Waziristan are blatantly a case of lying on one's resume. It's safe to say, the first lesson taught on the first day of classes in North Waziristan, the Harvard of bomb-making, is "Don't lock the keys to your getaway car inside the car that's supposed to blow up."

Too many people blew themselves up in too many creative ways for this buffoon to so callously ruin it all. We can't afford to be known as the country that put the 'error' in 'terrorism.'

Published in the Express Tribune, May 13th, 2010.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/12759/an-amateur-bomber-in-new-york/
 

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Shahzad planned to hit four other targets

Pakistani-American terror suspect Faisal Shahzad had planned to attack four other targets if his bid to detonate a car bomb near Times Square in New York was successful, according to a television channel.

FOX 5 News quoted a source as saying that Shahzad, arrested by the FBI for the May 1 failed bombing, has told investigators that he intended to attack four other locations in the U.S.

Other locations that he intended to attack were Rockefeller Centre, a Grand Central Terminal, the World Financial Centre and the Connecticut headquarters of defence contractor Sikorsky, the channel quoted the source as saying.

Sikorsky manufactures helicopters for the U.S. military, including the Black Hawk. It has headquarters in Shelton and Bridgeport - the two cities where Shahzad has lived.

"They want to maximize the exposure of the attack," security expert Michael Balboni, a former homeland security adviser for New York State, told FOX news.

"So they want to pick things that are iconic that perhaps have a lot of people so they can increase the body count. Anything to make it as dramatic as possible."

The source also said Shahzad picked out two dates - Saturday, May 1, the date of the attempted bombing, and an alternate Saturday, May 8.

Shahzad reportedly picked these dates and the time of 6:30 pm for the attack after checking out live streaming video of Times Square online and concluded that this time is when Times Square is the most crowded, it said.

The source also said Shahzad's connections in Pakistan had advised him to buy the fireworks, fertilizer and pathfinder over a period of time so it wouldn't raise any suspicions.

On May 1, Shahzad tried to blow up a crowded area of Times Square by leaving a car packed with explosives in the popular tourist site.

The 30-year-old Pakistani American was apprehended 53 hours later at John. F. Kennedy airport trying to escape to Dubai. He is believed to have been working in collusion with the Pakistan-Taliban.

Shahzad worked as a financial analyst in Connecticut where he lived with his wife. But his personal and professional life began to unravel last year during the financial crisis.

http://beta.thehindu.com/news/international/article433097.ece
 

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Times Square Bombing Suspect Appears in Court

Over the last two weeks, the naturalized Pakistani immigrant charged with driving a crude car bomb into Times Square settled into something of a strange daily routine: He signed a piece of paper waiving his right to a lawyer and a speedy court appearance. Then he continued to talk to federal authorities, providing what they have called valuable intelligence.

On Tuesday, that extraordinary routine — which has kept him out of a courtroom, away from a lawyer and out of the public eye — was interrupted. The immigrant, Faisal Shahzad, whose unsuccessful attempt to detonate the car bomb on May 1 wrought chaos among thousands of people in Times Square, appeared in court for the first time, represented by a lawyer.

But the tension and drama that led up to the brief proceeding, including a sweep of the packed fifth-floor courtroom that cleared mobs of reporters and spectators so the room could be secured, far overshadowed the substance of the nine-minute hearing.

Indeed, Mr. Shahzad, 30, a former financial analyst who was raised in a military family in Pakistan and earned degrees from the University of Bridgeport, spoke only one word — "yes" — during his appearance in Manhattan federal court, confirming that the information in an affidavit was the truth.

He seemed calm and looked intently at United States Magistrate Judge James C. Francis IV, who at one point read him his rights, including his right to remain silent, and warned him that anything he said could be used against him.

The hearing came after Mr. Shahzad indicated he was ready to stop waiving his right to a speedy court appearance, people briefed on the matter said. It is known as a presentment, or an initial court appearance on a complaint. Mr. Shahzad was not asked to enter a plea, and did not do so.

As Mr. Shahzad was led into the courtroom, the buzz of conversation among reporters, lawyers and spectators suddenly ceased. The room became so still that the scratch of courtroom artists could be heard.

Clad in a gray sweatshirt and sweat pants and Nike sneakers, Mr. Shahzad sat beside his court-appointed lawyer, Julia L. Gatto, with two United States marshals posted behind him, one of them a towering figure. Four more were lined up along the wall. Across the courtroom, the prosecution table was crowded with four assistant United States attorneys and Andrew P. Pachtman, the Federal Bureau of Investigation agent who swore out the complaint charging Mr. Shahzad with five felonies.

Mr. Shahzad, who has been held at an undisclosed location since his arrest, was arrested on May 3 at Kennedy International Airport aboard a plane that was about to leave for Dubai. He began cooperating with prosecutors and F.B.I. agents and police detectives from Joint Terrorism Task Force a short time later.

The day after the arrest, he was charged in the complaint with one count each of attempting acts of terrorism transcending national boundaries; attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction; using a destructive device in connection with an attempted crime of violence; transporting explosives; and attempting to destroy property with fire and explosives. The first two charges each carry a maximum sentence of life in prison.

Prosecutors said he had admitted receiving bomb-making training in the Pakistani region of Waziristan and driving a Nissan Pathfinder packed with propane, gasoline, fireworks and fertilizer into Times Square at about 6:30 p.m. on May 1, when the bustling crossroads was packed with a Saturday-night throng of tourists.

During the court appearance, Judge Francis asked for the time of Mr. Shahzad's arrest. An assistant United States attorney, Randall W. Jackson, said he was arrested on May 3 about 11 p.m.

Judge Francis asked whether he had waived speedy presentment "in the interim."

"That's correct, your honor," Mr. Jackson said.

Mr. Jackson told the judge that the government was seeking to detain Mr. Shahzad. Ms. Gatto did not oppose that request, although she left open the possibility of applying later for release on bond. Mr. Shahzad was ordered detained, and he is now being held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.

As the hearing ended, Ms. Gatto asked the judge to order that the Federal Bureau of Prisons make sure Mr. Shahzad was provided with halal meals, consistent with a Muslim diet.

Source
 
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ajtr

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the actual link is coming in front:

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-pakistan-major-20100519,0,1667275.story

Reporting from Islamabad, Pakistan

Investigators have arrested a Pakistani army major linked to the prime suspect in the botched attempt to bomb New York City's Times Square early this month, Pakistani law enforcement sources said Tuesday.
Pakistan army is thae baap of all jehadis and the headquarter of all jehadi group is GHQ pindi.Every terror attack have PA footprints including 9/11.
 

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'LeT trained Times Square bomber in Pak Occupied Kashmir'

Ottawa/Islamabad: In the latest and sensational twist to the botched Times Square bombing plot, a Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) commander has claimed that Faisal Shahzad, the confessed bomb plotter of Pakistani origin, had received terror training in one of the 'jihad' camps of the banned outfit in Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK).

A report in Maclean, Canada's weekly current affairs magazine, cited an unnamed LeT commander as saying that Shahzad, during his visit to Pakistan in 2006, had visited the LeT's main base of operations in Dulai, a village situated 25 kilometres away from Muzaffarabad, the capital of PoK.

"He was an eager recruit. Very intelligent but also very intense, and driven to make his mark for the sake of Islam," the magazine quoted the LeT commander, as describing Shahzad.

The LeT commander, however, denied any direct involvement of his organisation with New York bombing plot. "Shahzad came to us for training. He stayed with us for three months and we provided him with the basics. Then he went back to the U.S," the commander claimed.

The terror commander added that following the training, Shazad was asked to return back to the US and directed not to contact the LeT, which carried out the ghastly Mumbai terror attacks in 2008, for at least six months.

"After six months, we tried to contact him, but we received no response, not from emails or by telephone. We thought, well, okay, so maybe he's had a change of heart. We have thousands of recruits who come to us for training. It doesn't affect us if one of them is lost,' the magazine quoted the militant leader, as saying.

Recalling Shahzad's attitude during his terror training, the LeT commander said one thing which was most noticeable in him was that he had a strong desire for glory.

"He wanted to do something big, not just die an anonymous martyr alongside hundreds of other martyrs. He wanted something international. He wanted to be famous. For us, that was dangerous. We don't want attention brought to us, and we were worried that Shahzad's personal agenda would get him captured and bring the spotlight on us," the commander said.

Pakistan Army major held for links with Times Square bomber

A Pakistani Army major has been arrested for having links with Faisal Shahzad, the man behind the botched attempt to bomb Times Square in New York City early this month, a media report said Wednesday.

The major's involvement with Faisal Shahzad, who was arrested at John F. Kennedy International Airport as he attempted to fly to Dubai, remains unclear, but authorities say the two met in Islamabad and were in regular contact.

According to Pakistani law enforcement sources, the major met Shahzad, a naturalised US citizen of Pakistani descent, in Islamabad and was in contact with him on cellphone, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The major's arrest marks the first time someone in Pakistan's military has been directly linked to the case.
The sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity, did not say when the alleged meeting and phone calls between Shahzad and the major took place, or what was discussed.

The twist in the case comes as Pakistani authorities have learned more about the 30-year-old Shahzad's links with the Pakistani Taliban, the militant group suspected of helping him carry out the attempted bombing, the daily said.

Another suspect being held by Pakistani authorities is a Pakistani Taliban member who appeared to play the role of liaison between Shahzad and the militant group.

The Taliban member has told Pakistani intelligence agents that he met Shahzad three times last summer, Pakistani law enforcement sources said. According to US officials familiar with the case, the Taliban gave Shahzad roughly $15,000 to pay for the attempted bombing, the report said.

Shahzad, who appeared Tuesday in court in New York, has told US investigators that he went to North Waziristan, where he met with Taliban leaders and got training in bomb making.

Pakistani investigators and US officials say they believe Shahzad went to Mohmand, another region within Pakistan's tribal belt along the Afghan border.

Source: Agencies

http://news.in.msn.com/international/article.aspx?cp-documentid=3922311

now POK is worlds terrorist training or breeding ground, atleast now lets see.
will US drones bomb terror camps in POK?
 

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