NY Times Square bomb attempt

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Islam's Nowhere Men


By FOUAD AJAMI

'A Muslim has no nationality except his belief," the intellectual godfather of the Islamists, Egyptian Sayyid Qutb, wrote decades ago. Qutb's "children" are everywhere now; they carry the nationalities of foreign lands and plot against them. The Pakistani born Faisal Shahzad is a devotee of Sayyid Qutb's doctrine, and Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the Fort Hood shooter, was another.

Qutb was executed by the secular dictatorship of Gamal Abdel Nasser in 1966. But his thoughts and legacy endure. Globalization, the shaking up of continents, the ease of travel, and the doors for immigration flung wide open by Western liberal societies have given Qutb's worldview greater power and relevance. What can we make of a young man like Shahzad working for Elizabeth Arden, receiving that all-American degree, the MBA, jogging in the evening in Bridgeport, then plotting mass mayhem in Times Square?

The Islamists are now within the gates. They fled the fires and the failures of the Islamic world but brought the ruin with them. They mock national borders and identities. A parliamentary report issued by Britain's House of Commons on the London Underground bombings of July 7, 2005 lays bare this menace and the challenge it poses to a system of open borders and modern citizenship.

The four men who pulled off those brutal attacks, the report noted, "were apparently well integrated into British society." Three of them were second generation Britons born in West Yorkshire. The oldest, a 30-year-old father of a 14-month-old infant, "appeared to others as a role model to young people." One of the four, 22 years of age, was a boy of some privilege; he owned a red Mercedes given to him by his father and was given to fashionable hairstyles and designer clothing. This young man played cricket on the eve of the bombings. The next day, the day of the terror, a surveillance camera filmed him in a store. "He buys snacks, quibbles with the cashier over his change, looks directly at the CCTV camera, and leaves." Two of the four, rather like Faisal Shahzad, had spent time in Pakistan before they pulled off their deed. A year after the London terror, hitherto tranquil Canada had its own encounter with the new Islamism. A ring of radical Islamists were charged with plotting to attack targets in southern Ontario with fertilizer bombs. A school-bus driver was one of the leaders of these would-be jihadists. A report by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service unintentionally echoed the British House of Commons findings. "These individuals are part of Western society, and their 'Canadianness' makes detection more difficult. Increasingly, we are learning of more and more extremists that are homegrown. The implications of this shift are profound."

And indeed they are, but how can "Canadianness" withstand the call of the faith and the obligation of jihad? I think of one Egyptian Islamist in London, a man by the name of Yasser Sirri, who gave the matter away some six years ago: "The whole Arab world was dangerous for me. I went to London," he observed.

In Egypt, three sentences had been rendered against him: one condemned him to 25 years of hard labor, the second to 15 years, and the third to death for plotting to assassinate a prime minister. Sirri had fled Egypt to Yemen, then to the Sudan. But it was better and easier in bilad al-kufar, the lands of unbelief. There is wealth in the West and there are the liberties afforded by an open society.

In an earlier age—I speak here autobiographically, and not of some vanished world long ago but of the 1960s when I made my way to the United States—the world was altogether different. Mass migration from the Islamic world had not begun. The immigrants who turned up in Western lands were few, and they were keen to put the old lands, and their feuds and attachments, behind them. Islam was then a religion of Afro-Asia; it had not yet put down roots in Western Europe and the New World. Air travel was costly and infrequent.

The new lands, too, made their own claims, and the dominant ideology was one of assimilation. The national borders were real, and reflected deep civilizational differences. It was easy to tell where "the East" ended and Western lands began. Postmodernist ideas had not made their appearance. Western guilt had not become an article of faith in the West itself.

Nowadays the Islamic faith is portable. It is carried by itinerant preachers and imams who transmit its teachings to all corners of the world, and from the safety and plenty of the West they often agitate against the very economic and moral order that sustains them. Satellite television plays its part in this new agitation, and the Islam of the tele-preachers is invariably one of damnation and fire. From tranquil, banal places (Dubai and Qatar), satellite television offers an incendiary version of the faith to younger immigrants unsettled by a modern civilization they can neither master nor reject.

And home, the Old Country, is never far. Pakistani authorities say Faisal Shahzad made 13 visits to Pakistan in the last seven years. This would have been unthinkable three or four decades earlier. Shahzad lived on the seam between the Old Country and the New. The path of citizenship he took gave him the precious gift of an American passport but made no demands on him.

From Pakistan comes a profile of Shahzad's father, a man of high military rank, and of property and standing: He was "a man of modern thinking and of the modern age," it was said of him in his ancestral village of Mohib Banda in recent days. That arc from a secular father to a radicalized son is, in many ways, the arc of Pakistan since its birth as a nation-state six decades ago. The secular parents and the radicalized children is also a tale of Islam, that broken pact with modernity, the mothers who fought to shed the veil and the daughters who now wish to wear the burqa in Paris and Milan.

In its beginnings, the Pakistan of Faisal Shahzad's parents was animated by the modern ideals of its founder, Muhammad Ali Jinnah. In that vision, Pakistan was to be a state for the Muslims of the subcontinent, but not an Islamic state in the way it ordered its political and cultural life. The bureaucratic and military elites who dominated the state, and defined its culture, were a worldly breed. The British Raj had been their formative culture.

But the world of Pakistan was recast in the 1980s under a zealous and stern military leader, Zia ul-Haq. Zia offered Pakistan Islamization and despotism. He had ridden the jihad in Afghanistan next door to supreme power; he brought the mullahs into the political world, and they, in turn, brought the militants with them.

***

This was the Pakistan in which young Faisal Shahzad was formed; the world of his parents was irretrievable. The maxim that Pakistan is governed by a trinity—Allah, army, America—gives away this confusion: The young man who would do his best to secure an American education before succumbing to the call of the jihad is a man in the grip of a deep schizophrenia. The overcrowded cities of Islam—from Karachi and Casablanca to Cairo—and those cities in Europe and North America where the Islamic diaspora is now present in force have untold multitudes of men like Faisal Shahzad.

This is a long twilight war, the struggle against radical Islamism. We can't wish it away. No strategy of winning "hearts and minds," no great outreach, will bring this struggle to an end. America can't conciliate these furies. These men of nowhere—Faisal Shahzad, Nidal Malik Hasan, the American-born renegade cleric Anwar Awlaki now holed up in Yemen and their likes—are a deadly breed of combatants in this new kind of war. Modernity both attracts and unsettles them. America is at once the object of their dreams and the scapegoat onto which they project their deepest malignancies.
 
Last edited:

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Faisal Shahzad's Taliban link gives President Obama an excuse to unleash fury on Pakistan evildoers




WASHINGTON - There will be blood.

The fight against the terrorists may finally be no-holds barred with the revelation that Faisal Shahzad was trained and dispatched by the Pakistani Taliban to slaughter innocents in Times Square.

President Obama will undoubtedly demand the Pakistani Army assault militant strongholds in North Waziristan and the far northern tribal zone, which it has refused to do.

Arthur Keller, a former CIA case officer in Waziristan, where Shahzad has admitted he learned bomb-making from the Tehreek-e-Taliban, anticipates the U.S. will tell Pakistan: "If you're not going to help, just get the hell out of the way."

America's message is an exclamation point on a huge body of evidence that even Pakistani officials sympathetic to the Islamist sociopaths will have to face up to.

If you doubt that Obama is about to let slip the dogs of war, you need only look back at what he said as a long-shot presidential hopeful in a controversial August 2007 foreign policy speech.

"If we have actionable intelligence about high-value terrorist targets and [Pakistan[ won't act, we will," said then-Sen. Obama.

Then-campaign adviser Susan Rice - now Obama's ambassador to the UN - told me then, "Nobody is talking about a ground invasion of Pakistan's tribal areas. That isn't feasible." But she predicted that U.S. Special Operations in the region would be beefed up - and they have been, including in Pakistan. Three U.S. operators were recently killed by a suicide bomber in Lower Dir - near areas where the U.S. has hunted Osama Bin Laden.

"CIA and Special Operations Command could get license to operate more freely," Keller said. "That's a logical escalation."

In fall 2008, President George W. Bush, with Obama's apparent blessing as the President-elect, unleashed the CIA to pound evildoers in Pakistan. One of the 121 missile strikes since then killed the founder of the Tehreek-e-Taliban, Baitullah Mehsud. His successor, Hakimullah Mehsud, organized the suicide bombing of a CIA camp in Afghanistan last December as payback.

The CIA then tried to zap Hakimullah Mehsud - but he appeared on video right after the attempted Times Square bombing, promising attacks on the U.S. as revenge for CIA drone strikes.

"It's almost like a Sicilian vendetta killing cycle," Keller said.

The Taliban are Pashtun tribesmen and swear revenge when drones blow up safehouses in Waziristan.

Convicted New York City bomb plotter Najibullah Zazi was a Pashtun who admitted he was trained by Al Qaeda in Waziristan, and a senior Pakistani military officer told the Daily News last week that, "Shahzad's wife is Pashtun."

"They're dutybound to seek blood revenge, and it passes down over generations. That's the problem with it," said Sean Langan, a British journalist held hostage by the Taliban in Pakistan in 2008.



Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local...gonna_come_off_in_pakistan.html#ixzz0naqvC300
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Faisal Shahzad Photo After Arrest



Updated: Monday, 10 May 2010, 6:01 PM EDT
Published : Monday, 10 May 2010, 10:25 AM EDT

BY LUKE FUNK

MYFOXNY.COM - MyFoxNY.com has obtained a photograph taken of Faisal Shahzad shortly after his arrest as the prime suspect in the Times Square car bomb investigation.

The photo shows Shahzad chained to a bench at John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens after customs agents pulled him from an Emirates airliner that was about to take off for Dubai.

It was taken in a holding room in Terminal 4 at the airport.

Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistan-born naturalized U.S. citizen from Long Hill Avenue in Shelton, Conn., is accused of driving the 1993 Nissan Pathfinder loaded with a propane-and-gasoline bomb into Times Square on Saturday, May 1.

Federal prosecutors have filed terrorism charges against Shahzad, who has allegedly confessed and said he received training at a terror camp in Pakistan and admitted loading the SUV with an explosive device.

Fox 5 News reported Shahzad landed an entry-level job as a budget analyst at a marketing firm in Norwalk in 2006. In 2009, he left the job and his home in Shelton went into foreclosure. A short time later, after becoming a naturalized citizen, Shahzad was planning a trip to Pakistan where he would get training on explosives, said officials.

Shahzad, 30, had recently returned from a five-month trip to Pakistan before the attempted bombing in Times Square. He reportedly bought the Nissan Pathfinder with cash from a 19-year-old female college student from Bridgeport, Conn.
 

nitesh

Mob Control Manager
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
7,550
Likes
1,309
whooooooooooooo

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...nce-agents-involved-in-Times-Square-plot.html

American investigators believe rogue Pakistani intelligence agents may have been involved in the Times Square bomb plot, a potentially devastating blow to the country's shaky anti-terror credentials. They are probing a possible connection between Faisal Shahzad and Pakistan's powerful military and intelligence establishment.

His background as the son of a senior Air Force officer may have brought him into contact with intelligence agents who helped build the Afghan Taliban and who have channelled cash and training to home-grown Jihadis, according to a source familiar with the investigation. "You don't know who he might have been introduced to in that sort of military environment," said the source.

Such a connection would be desperately embarrassing to the government in Islamabad, which is under pressure to demonstrate its commitment to tackling terrorism.

But it would help investigators make sense of how a boy raised in the secular, moderate environment of Pakistan's military schools could stand accused of terrorism.
{comment: now this is a blatant lie paddled around}

Investigation teams, which have been arriving from the US since the start of the week, are at work in Peshawar, close to Shahzad's family home, Karachi, where he spent time as an adult as well as in Rawalpindi, where the Army and intelligence agencies are based, according to the source.

They believe he may have used colleagues of his father – Air Vice Marshal Baharul Haq – to make contact with the Pakistan Taliban.

Pakistan has a history of using Jihadi groups as a tool of its foreign policy. Its Inter-Services Intelligence agency helped equip and train Afghan Mujahideen fighting Soviet occupation during the 1980s and then used the Taliban to fill the resulting vacuum. They have supported militant groups in Indian-controlled Kashmir.=heheh

However, the government has become increasingly concerned in recent years about groups such as Lashkar-e-Taiba, blamed for the devastating attacks in Mumbai in December 2008, and has distanced itself from some former allies. {comment: again a lie}

American investigators are now examining what links might still exist "They kept the connection in case of what India might do," said the source.

US investigators believe the Pakistan Taliban provided training and financing for the plot.

Pakistan is already under pressure to do more to rid its tribal areas of militants.

At the weekend, Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State, issued a stark warning.

"We've made it very clear that if – heaven-forbid – an attack like this that we can trace back to Pakistan were to have been successful, there would be very severe consequences," she said.

Fresh evidence emerged yesterday of Pakistan's problems with militants.

Up to 40 camps housing terrorists are in operation along the Pakistan- Afghanistan border, according to the Russian ambassador to India.

Alexandar Kadakin said the findings were based on Russian intelligence and satellite imagery.

No one from the Pakistan government or military was available to comment.
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
whooooooooooooo

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...nce-agents-involved-in-Times-Square-plot.html

American investigators believe rogue Pakistani intelligence agents may have been involved in the Times Square bomb plot, a potentially devastating blow to the country's shaky anti-terror credentials. They are probing a possible connection between Faisal Shahzad and Pakistan's powerful military and intelligence establishment.

His background as the son of a senior Air Force officer may have brought him into contact with intelligence agents who helped build the Afghan Taliban and who have channelled cash and training to home-grown Jihadis, according to a source familiar with the investigation. "You don't know who he might have been introduced to in that sort of military environment," said the source.

Such a connection would be desperately embarrassing to the government in Islamabad, which is under pressure to demonstrate its commitment to tackling terrorism.

But it would help investigators make sense of how a boy raised in the secular, moderate environment of Pakistan's military schools could stand accused of terrorism.
{comment: now this is a blatant lie paddled around}

Investigation teams, which have been arriving from the US since the start of the week, are at work in Peshawar, close to Shahzad's family home, Karachi, where he spent time as an adult as well as in Rawalpindi, where the Army and intelligence agencies are based, according to the source.

They believe he may have used colleagues of his father – Air Vice Marshal Baharul Haq – to make contact with the Pakistan Taliban.

Pakistan has a history of using Jihadi groups as a tool of its foreign policy. Its Inter-Services Intelligence agency helped equip and train Afghan Mujahideen fighting Soviet occupation during the 1980s and then used the Taliban to fill the resulting vacuum. They have supported militant groups in Indian-controlled Kashmir.=heheh

However, the government has become increasingly concerned in recent years about groups such as Lashkar-e-Taiba, blamed for the devastating attacks in Mumbai in December 2008, and has distanced itself from some former allies. {comment: again a lie}

.
Not a surprise at all.Take any terror attacks world wide iyou will find pakistani link and smoking gun would always be find in the hands of ISI.Just to look in recent past the involvement of ISI on the major attacks on usa including 9/11 you will find ISI involved in the planning and execution and financing .refer following links........

Pakistani Role in Terrorism Against the U.S.A

http://www.geocities.com/charcha_2000/
http://pak-terror.freeservers.com/Terror_as_a_Policy_Tool.htm
http://sify.com/news/specials/terrormap/?vsv=TopHP1

Moreover faisal shahzad being from military family there were sure indications of some sort of iuntelligence agency's involvement.remember on many occassions while travelling to usa he declared carrying cash amount of $80K or so.
 

DaRk WaVe

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2009
Messages
809
Likes
97
Convicted New York City bomb plotter Najibullah Zazi was a Pashtun who admitted he was trained by Al Qaeda in Waziristan, and a senior Pakistani military officer told the Daily News last week that, "Shahzad's wife is Pashtun."

"They're dutybound to seek blood revenge, and it passes down over generations. That's the problem with it," said Sean Langan, a British journalist held hostage by the Taliban in Pakistan in 2008.
so they are trying to say all Pushtuns are Taliban huh!!
what kind of hallucinated statement was that?
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
He may be neutralized citizen of Chile or may be some indian just their to malign pakistan's name=xD,,,,,just like Faisal shahzad is so why should pakistan be blamed.Even Mr. qureshi said faisal is not pakistani.

Faisal Shahzad is not Pakistani: FM

Updated at: 2232 PST, Sunday, May 09, 2010
KARACHI: Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi Sunday said Faisal Shahzad, the man involved in failed attack at Times Squre, is not a Pakistani but a naturalised American citizen.

In an interview when asked to comment on reports of recovery of two Pakistani passports from Faisal Shahzad, Qureshi said: "I will have to check. I am not aware of that but I am aware that he is a naturalised American citizen, and the Government of Pakistan will cooperate with the United States and help them in whatever way we can."
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Your weekend reading on terrorism​

Posted By Daniel W. Drezner Friday, May 7, 2010 - 12:29 PM Share
Your humble blogger has been relatively sanguine about the attempted Times Square bombing effort. That said, Bruce Hoffman's National Interest essay -- published before the attempt -- is a sobering read that is worth a close look. The paragraph that stood out for me:

We have failed to acknowledge that al-Qaeda has a strategy and, moreover, that it is one designed to overwhelm us. It is a strategy of attrition. And it is a strategy of attrition that focuses on strengthening its own capabilities and expanding its recruitment pool, particularly on our shores, while weakening our ability to fight. It seeks to flood already-stressed intelligence systems with "noise" and with low-level threats from "lone wolves" and other jihadi hangers-on (i.e., low-hanging fruit) that will consume the attention of law-enforcement and intelligence agencies in the hope that these distractions will allow more serious operations to slip by unnoticed.
Food for thought.
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Senators Demand Tighter Rules on No-Fly List and Addition to Terror Group List


WASHINGTON — After a briefing on the Times Square bombing attempt, the top Democrat and Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee called Tuesday for improvements in the no-fly list and the addition of the Pakistani Taliban to the government's official list of terrorist organizations. Senator Dianne Feinstein of California, the committee's Democratic chairwoman, and Senator Christopher S. Bond of Missouri, the Republican vice chairman, said that the tightened requirements for airlines to check the no-fly list, imposed after the man accused of being the Times Square bomber was allowed to board a flight to Dubai, were still not adequate.

After the accused man, Faisal Shahzad, 30, a naturalized American citizen born in Pakistan, was taken from the plane and arrested, the Department of Homeland Security said Emirates airline had failed to check an updated no-fly list to which his name had been added earlier in the day. The department had ordered airlines to check the list within two hours of being told of an update.

But Mrs. Feinstein said that the delay should be reduced to 30 minutes, and that a plan for the Transportation Security Administration to take over the no-fly list checks from airlines should be accelerated.

Mrs. Feinstein said that Mr. Shahzad "was almost completely under the radar," and as a person living legally in the United States appears to represent a new wave of homegrown terrorists.

"It's clear we're facing a new kind of attacker, who's already here, able to hide in plain sight, and we need to think about new defenses," she said. "The no-fly list itself is one of our best lines of defense."

Particularly after an attempted act of terrorism, Mr. Bond added, "This is not something that should be waiting on a list for people to review hours later."

Both senators called for the State Department to add the Pakistani Taliban, known as Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, to the government's list of designated terrorist organizations. The same demand was made separately by a group of senators led by Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of New York, in a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The list includes organizations believed to threaten the security of the United States or its citizens. The Pakistani Taliban have focused largely on the Pakistani government and military targets, but they have grown increasingly close to Al Qaeda and since last year have publicly threatened to attack the United States.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press" that the Pakistani Taliban "directed" the attempted Times Square attack on May 1, which involved an S.U.V. loaded with gasoline and propane.

Mr. Bond said that based on Tuesday's briefing, he thought the evidence was less definitive than Mr. Holder suggested. Mrs. Feinstein said she disagreed with Mr. Bond but would not elaborate, saying the evidence was classified.

A Justice Department spokesman, Dean Boyd, said the department stood by Mr. Holder's characterization of the Pakistani Taliban's role in the attack.
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Chile: Pakistani Still in Custody


A Santiago court on Tuesday extended the detention of a Pakistani man arrested Monday after traces of explosive material were found on his belongings as he entered the American Embassy there. Embassy officials initially detained Mohamed Saif ur-Rehman, who is 28 years old, after security-screening equipment detected the explosive residue on papers he was carrying, said Paul E. Simons, the American ambassador to Chile. The man had gone to the embassy to deal with a "visa issue," Mr. Simons said.

A State Department official said the man had been called to the embassy because his name had appeared on a watch list and because officials wanted to question him, and to ensure that he was the same person on the list. It was unclear if that list was related to terrorism or other criminal activity. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity. The Associated Press reported that Chile's Radio Cooperativa said the man told reporters, "I am not a terrorist."
 

DaRk WaVe

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2009
Messages
809
Likes
97

Investigators dismiss US claims that Faisal Shahzad was working under direction of Pakistani Taliban

Pakistani investigators have found no evidence to support American claims that the failed Times Square bomber was working under the direction of the Pakistani Taliban, the Guardian has learned.

Senior officials in Washington – including the attorney general, Eric Holder, and John Brennan, the White House's special adviser on counterterrorism – have said that the suspected bomber, Faisal Shahzad, conspired with militants in Pakistan, but a Pakistani security official with knowledge of the investigation said: "No Taliban link has come to the fore."

The interrogation of Muhammad Rehan, a friend of Shahzad who was arrested last week outside a radical mosque in Karachi, has not yielded a link to the Pakistani Taliban or any other militant group. Rehan, a member of the banned Jaish-e-Mohammad extremist group, remains the only suspected link found between 30-year-old Shahzad and the militant underworld in Pakistan.

Officials in Islamabad are perplexed and angry at statements from Washington about Shahzad's links with the Pakistani Taliban, believing that the US is exploiting the issue to apply pressure for new military offensives in Pakistan's tribal border area with Afghanistan, in the north Waziristan region.

"We have not found any involvement of Rehan [in the New York attempted bombing]. He didn't introduce Faisal Shahzad to the Pakistani Taliban," said the security official.

"There are no roots to this case, so how can we trace something back?"


An FBI team which flew into Pakistan after the arrest of Shahzad was allowed to question Rehan on Sunday. More than a dozen other suspects taken into custody in Karachi have been released, but the investigation is continuing, so new leads could yet emerge.

Rehan's arrest as he left prayers at the Karachi mosque was seized on by the international press as evidence of Shahzad's involvement with Pakistani militant groups. It emerged that Rehan and Shahzad had last year taken a 1,000-mile road trip from Karachi to Peshawar, on the edge of Pakistan's tribal area, raising further suspicions.

However, Pakistani investigators have found that Rehan was not a very active member of JEM, a violent group primarily against India and with no history of global activities. He knew Shahzad because he is related to Shahzad's wife.

Shahzad, a naturalised American citizen of Pakistani origin, told US interrogators that he had been trained in Waziristan, part of Pakistan's tribal area, according to the court charges laid against him.

After the failed attack, the Pakistani Taliban released a video in which its chief trainer of suicide bombers, Qari Hussain, appeared to claim responsibility. But that video said nothing specifically about New York, Shahzad, or a car bomb.

Since then, the Pakistani Taliban's official spokesman, Azam Tariq, has twice denied that his group was involved with Shahzad. The ineptness of Shahzad's bomb, which did not go off, also raised doubts over whether the Pakistani Taliban could have trained him.

Holder said at the weekend that the Pakistani Taliban were "intimately involved" in Shahzad's attempted bombing. Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, also warned Islamabad of "dire consequences" if a plot originating in Pakistan succeeded in the US.

But David Petraeus, the American general in charge of the Middle East and central Asia, had previously said that Shahzad was a "lone wolf" who was "inspired by militants in Pakistan but didn't have direct contact with them".


A senior Pakistani government official said: "There is a disconnect between the Pentagon and the [Obama] administration. The Pentagon gets it that more open pressure on Pakistan is not helpful."

The US focus on Pakistan's tribal area, thought to be a power base for the Afghan Taliban and al-Qaida, as well as Pakistani Taliban, continued today with another missile strike from an unmanned American drone aircraft, the third such attack since the failed Times Square bombing. The strike, in north Waziristan, reportedly killed at least 14 militants. The Obama administration has unleashed an intensive campaign of drone attacks inside Pakistani territory, targeting extremist hideouts in the tribal area.
 
Last edited:

DaRk WaVe

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2009
Messages
809
Likes
97
Republican doubts Taliban link to New York plot

Senator Kit Bond, after a briefing by U.S. counterterrorism and law enforcement officials, said it was not confirmed the accused bomber -- Faisal Shahzad, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Pakistan -- was working for the Islamist group.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said on Sunday evidence showed the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) helped direct the failed attack in New York's teeming Times Square and likely assisted in financing it.

"I am not convinced by the information that I've seen so far that there was adequate, confirmable intelligence to corroborate the statements that were made on Sunday television shows," Bond told reporters after the classified briefing.

"We've heard lots of suspicions and tenuous connections, but as far as I'm concerned you can't make statements prior to getting the intelligence."

Republicans have been openly and repeatedly critical of the handling of terrorism cases by the administration of President Barack Obama, a Democrat.

The chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Dianne Feinstein, emerged from the same briefing disagreeing with Bond. She said there was a "high likelihood" of interactions between Shahzad and the Pakistani Taliban.

TTP, based in Pakistan's lawless border regions, claimed responsibility on May 2 for the attempted attack.

Shahzad, 30, was arrested trying to flee the United States on a flight to Dubai. He has admitted to the plot and to receiving bomb training in Waziristan, Pakistan, U.S. prosecutors have said.

One U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said later on Tuesday: "There are indications that the TTP was involved in the Times Square attempt." A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment on Bond's remarks.

As part of the U.S.-led war against Islamist militants in neighboring Afghanistan, U.S. drone aircraft launched two attacks on a Taliban and al Qaeda stronghold in Pakistan, killing at least 24 suspected fighters.

"COMPLETELY UNDER THE RADAR"

U.S. officials initially doubted the TTP claim over the New York plot. But after Shahzad's arrest, Holder came out publicly to say there was a connection.

"The evidence we've now developed shows that the Pakistani Taliban has directed this plot," Holder said on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. "And I suspect that we are going to come up with evidence which shows that they helped to finance it."

Feinstein expressed concern that Shahzad was "completely under the radar" of law enforcement.

"It's clear we're facing a new kind of attacker, who's already here and able to hide in plain sight, and we need to think about new defenses," she said.

Under pressure from Democrats in the Senate, the State Department said on Tuesday it was looking at adding TTP to the U.S. list of "foreign terrorist" groups.

In New York, the city's police commissioner Ray Kelly told reporters Shahzad knew authorities were pursuing him and tried to leave the country after federal officials leaked information about the investigation.

Shahzad was arrested by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents in New York minutes before his Emirates Airline flight was to depart. He had eluded law enforcement agents earlier in the day.

Kelly said Shahzad was tipped off by media reports that authorities were hunting for a Pakistani-American identified as the buyer of the sport utility vehicle used to carry a crude bomb made of fuel and fireworks into Times Square.

"There was an inordinate amount of information given out by somebody in this case," Kelly said. "He already knew that we were looking for him. That is not helpful and I think the government has to look internally to see that doesn't happen."

Kelly said the information was not leaked by New York police. The FBI and Justice Department declined to comment.

Since his arrest, Shahzad has been talking with authorities and waived his legal rights.

"Over the past week-and-a-half we have been working to understand everything we can about Shahzad," Kelly said, adding his story was "another classic case of homegrown terrorism."

At an appearance in Oakland, California, Holder told reporters the incident was "troubling but also indicative of what we've seen over the past year."
 
Last edited:

nandu

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2009
Messages
1,913
Likes
163
Terror in NY: A Jem Link?

By B Raman


Najibullah Zazi , a 25-year-old Afghan citizen with permanent resident status in the US, was arrested by the USA's Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in September 2009 on a charge of belonging to an Al Qaeda motivated and trained cell, which was allegedly planning suicide bombings in the New York City subway system. He pleaded guilty along with one of two other co-conspirators. The third co-conspirator did not plead guilty. The case is reserved for judgement in June.

According to the prosecution, the three had planned to attack the subway system at the instance of Saleh al-Somali, Al-Qaeda's head of external operations, and Rashid Rauf, who was described by the prosecution as an Al-Qaeda operative. Rashid Rauf, who was reportedly killed in a US Drone (pilotless plane) strike in North Waziristan in November,2008, belonged to the Jaish-e-Mohammad (JEM) of Pakistan and was related by marriage to Maulana Masood Azhar, the Amir of the JEM.

Zarein Ahmedzay, a 25-year-old former New York taxi driver, one of the three co-conspirators, who pleaded guilty to charges including conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction, claimed the three had bought ingredients to make explosives similar to those used in the July 7 2005 bombings in London which killed 52 people on three tube trains and a bus. Ahmedzay told the court that he travelled to Pakistan with Najibullah Zazi and Adis Medunjanin in the summer of 2008. They went to a training camp in North Waziristan and volunteered to join the Taliban and fight the US forces in Afghanistan, but were told they would be "more useful if we returned to New York City"¦ to conduct operations."Asked by the judge what kind of operations, he said: "Suicide-bombing operations." Zazi told the court:"During the training, al Qaeda leaders asked us to return to the United States and conduct a martyrdom operation. We agreed to this plan." It was reported on April 13,2010, that a fourth suspect in the case—-not yet named as a co-conspirator—had been arrested in Pakistan and that the US authorities were trying to get him to the US for interrogation.

Rashid Rauf, who motivated them, was from a Mirpuri family of Birmingham. The Mirpuris are the Punjabi-speaking residents of Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir (POK). He disappeared from the UK in 2002 after the British Police suspected him in connection with the murder of one of his relatives in Birmingham. On August 9, 2006, Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) claimed to have picked him up from a house in Bhawalpur, southern Punjab, which he had bought after coming to Pakistan in 2002. The Pakistani authorities claimed that he was in close touch with Al Qaeda and that it was his arrest that gave them an inkling regarding the imminence of the plot of a group of jihadi extremists based in the UK to blow up a number of US-bound planes. The discovery of the conspiracy and the arrest of many UK-based suspects of Pakistani origin were then announced by the British Police.

Despite his alleged involvement in the August 2006 plot to blow up a number of US-bound planes with liquid explosives, the Pakistani authorities avoided handing him over to the British Police for interrogation. The Government of Pakistan told a court on October 30, 2006, that Rashid Rauf had been detained under the Security of Pakistan Act. A Rawalpindi Anti-Terrorism Judge, Justice Safdar Hussain Malik, passed orders on November 21, 2006, approving his judicial custody in the Adiala jail. This ruled out his early transfer to the British Police for interrogation. He escaped from custody under mysterious circumstances on December, 16,2007, while being taken back to jail from the court. Many alleged that the ISI had allowed him to escape to avoid pressure from the British Police to hand him over for interrogation.

Quoting an unnamed senior Pakistani security official, an Islamabad datelined report of the Agence France Press (AFP) stated as follows on November 22, 2008: "The alleged mastermind of a 2006 transatlantic airplane bombing plot was killed in a US missile attack in northwest Pakistan early Saturday (November 15, 2008) .The transatlantic bombing plot alleged mastermind Rashid Rauf was killed along with an Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative in the US missile strike in North Waziristan early Saturday," a senior security official told AFP. The Al-Qaeda operative killed in the strike was identified as Abu Zubair al-Misri, the official added. He and the Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative were killed along with at least two other militants in a US drone attack on the house of a local tribesman in the village of Alikhel, part of a district known as a stronghold for Al-Qaeda and the Taliban, officials said. The missile strike came days after another US drone attack which killed six rebels, including an Arab Al-Qaeda operative. That attack prompted Taliban militants based in the rugged tribal territory bordering Afghanistan to warn of reprisal attacks across Pakistan if there were more strikes by the US."

According to the "Daily Telegraph", Rauf had been suspected of involvement in almost every significant terrorist plot in Britain since his escape to Pakistan in 2002, including the explosions of July 7, 2005 in London, the failed attacks of July 21, 2005 in London and the plot to blow up airliners over the Atlantic.He was also behind an alleged plan to attack shopping centres in Manchester during Easter 2008.

Maulana Masood Azhar used to be a leader of the Harkat-ul-Mujahideen (HUM), a founding member of Osama bin Laden's International Islamic Front For Jihad against the Crusaders and the Jewish People formed in 1998. Its then Amir, Maulana Fazlur Rehman Khalil, was a signatory of bin Laden's first fatwa calling for attacks against the US. Azhar had fought as a member of bin Laden's group in Somalia in the early 1990s. In 1994, he entered India and was arrested by the Police and kept in custody in Jammu & Kashmir. He was one of those released by the Government of India in December,1999, to secure the release of the passengers of a plane of the Indian Airlines hijacked by the HUM to Kandahar to demand the release of Azhar and others. After his return to Pakistan from Kandahar, Azhar developed differences with Maulana Fazlur Rehman Khalil, left the HUM and formed his own organization in January 2000 called the JEM. bin Laden failed in his efforts to patch up the differences between the two. He then switched his support from the HUM to the JEM.

The JEM was very active in J&K and was suspected of involvement in the attempted attack on the Indian Parliament in New Delhi on December 13,2001. Unlike the Lashkar-e-Toiba (LET), which never indulges in an act of terrorism in Pakistani territory and against Pakistani targets, the JEM has been involved in acts of terrorism in Pakistani territory. It was suspected of involvement, along with Al Qaeda, in the two unsuccessful attempts to kill Pervez Musharraf in Rawalpindi in December,2003.It supported the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) in its operations against the Pakistan Army in the Swat Valley and then in South Waziristan. It is now believed to have its training camps in North Waziristan along with those of Ilyas Kashmiri of the 313 Brigade.

Since Rashid Rauf joined it in 2002, the JEM has been training members of the Pakistani diaspora in the UK. The Zazi's case was the first indication that it may be training jihadi volunteers from the US too. As part of the investigation into the attempted incendiary attack in Times Square of New York by Faisal Shahzad, a US citizen of Pakistani origin, on May 1, 2010, four suspected members of the JEM in Pakistan are reported to have been detained by the Pakistani authorities. Among those detained is one Muhammed Rehan, a suspected associate of Shahzad who allegedly has links to the JEM. According to a senior Pakistani official, Rehan made possible a meeting between Shahzad and at least one senior Taliban official. He alleged that Rehan drove Shahzad on July 7, 2009, to Peshawar. They also went to the Waziristan region, where they met with one or more senior Taliban leaders.

The suspected involvement of the JEM in the training of Faisal, if proved correct, would indicate, in the wake of its involvement in the motivation and training of the Zazi cell, a possible link between the members of the Zazi cell and Faisal. It would also indicate the possibility that like Zazi, Faisal was not acting alone. The JEM is becoming as worrisome as the LET as a surrogate of Al Qaeda using angry elements in the Pakistani diaspora for acts of terrorism not only in the UK as it had done in the past, but also in the US now.

http://www.indiandefencereview.com/2010/05/terror-in-ny-a-jem-link.html
 

nandu

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2009
Messages
1,913
Likes
163
Terror in NY : Q & A

By B Raman

There has been some criticism in the US media of the handling of the case relating to the attempt to cause an incendiary explosion in Times Square, New York, on the evening of May 1,2010, by Faisal Shahzad, a US citizen of Pakistani origin. To what extent is the criticism justified?

The intervention and forensic procedures worked very well from the moment a T-shirt vendor alerted a policeman that smoke was coming out of the Nissan Pathfinder vehicle. The people in the area were evacuated in an orderly manner. The area was sealed. The explosives expert of the NY Police defused the explosive device in the car. The forensic experts, who took over at this stage, did a quick job in establishing that the car had recently changed ownership, tracing the previous owner and with her help establishing Faisal Shahzad as the present owner. There was a slip-up in the follow-up thereafter. A police surveillance team, which was tailing Faisal, lost him. The Emirates Airlines at the JFK airport failed to notice that there was an alert from the US authorities to all airlines issued on the forenoon of May 3 not to let Faisal board any flight. However, the US Customs noticed his name in the passenger manifest sent to them after all passengers had boarded, the doors of the aircraft had closed and it had started moving away from the departure gate. They brought the aircraft back and the police arrested Faisal. Thus, the only slip-up by US officials was in missing him during the surveillance. Such slip-ups do occur during surveillance unless it was a bumper-to-bumper surveillance, which would be meaningless.

Why did the police keep him under surveillance instead of arresting him immediately after he was identified?

They probably wanted to identify his associates, if he had any.

Why did Faisal stay on in the US for 48 hours instead of fleeing immediately after parking the car with the incendiary device in Times Square?

It is intriguing why he did not flee immediately. Mir Aimal Kansi, the Pakistani who killed two CIA officers in Washington DC in January 1993, and Ramzi Yousef, another Pakistani, who was involved in the attempt to blow up the World Trade Centre in NY in February,1993, flew out of the US immediately after committing the crime. Faisal stayed on for 48 hours. If he had gone to the airport after leaving the vehicle in Times Square and left the US, he would have escaped for the time being. He did not do so. Instead, he went back to Connecticut, his city of residence, by train and tried to flee only after coming to know that the police had identified him. He appears to have been not a very well trained jihadi. He left a trail everywhere. He entered into e-Mail correspondence with the previous owner of the vehicle. He gave her the number of his disposable mobile telephone. He left in the Nissan vehicle a key bunch containing the key of his apartment and of another car which he owned. He lingered on in the US for 48 hours after making the attempt to cause an incendiary attack. This dos not speak highly of his security consciousness.

Was he a self-motivated or an externally-motivated jihadi?

He appears to have been a self-motivated jihadi—-a volunteer for jihad and not a recruit. This is apparent from the preparations made by him for leaving the US once for all. He had stopped making the mortgage payments on an apartment which he had bought with a bank loan, taken his wife and two children to Pakistan and left them there and left his job as a financial analyst with a local company.

What does the incident speak of the quality of his motivation?

Not very high. He was angry against the US, but not angry enough to volunteer for an act of suicide terrorism. He was attached to his wife and children. He wanted to commit an act of terrorism against the US. At the same time, he did not want to "martyr" himself. He wanted to live. Being an educated person, he did not apparently believe in the jihadi brain-washing stuff that suicide bombers will go direct to heaven where many virgins would be waiting for them. Whoever trained him could not succeed in converting him into a do or die jihadi. He was totally different from the three Pakistani suicide bombers, who carried out the suicide bombings in Lndon in July 2005. They had been trained by Al Qaeda, which had made a good job of the training by converting them into highly-motivated suicide bombers.

Why did the incendiary device fail?

It was noticed promptly by a vendor. The Police intervened promptly. The connections were loose. The detonation took a longer time to take place than it does normally. This gave the police time to defuse it. The alertness of the vendor, the professionalism of the police and luck contributed to the failure.

It has been reported by some sections of the US media that the fertiliser which Faisal had used was a harmless type which would not have caused an explosion?

Ever since the jihadi terrorists started using nitrogenous fertilisers as an explosive material, the authorities in Western countries have been persuading fertiliser manufacturers to change the chemical composition of the fertiliser produced by them to ensure that they cannot be used as an explosive material. Most of the fertilisers now being sold in the West do not explode. Faisal and his trainers were probably not aware of this. He bought a fertiliser without knowing it would not explode.

It has been reported that the car owner who sold the Nissan to Faisal did not know his name. She gave a physical description of him. After that, the police showed her some pics. One of them was of Faisal and she identified him as the person who bought her car. How did the police zero in on him so fast?

This is an intriguing aspect of the case. This creates a suspicion in one's mind that the FBI knew Faisal before in some connection. He was probably not a stranger to them. I would not be surprised if like David Coleman Headley of the Chicago cell of the Lashkar-e-Toiba (LET) Faisal had also been in touch with the FBI.

Was Faisal acting alone or did he have accomplices?

It has been reported that he has been claiming that he acted alone. His accomplices were probably in Pakistan and not in the US. It would seem that almost all the phone calls made by him in the days before the attempt were to numbers in Pakistan and not to numbers in the US.

He is reported to have admitted that he received training in bomb-making in the Waziristan area of Pakistan. Who might have trained him?


The Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) has claimed responsibility for the incident, but the quality of the training given to him appears rather low, but the TTP's training is of high quality like the training imparted by Al Qaeda to the London suicide bombers.

The Pakistani jihadis of the diaspora in the UK seem to have had more successes in carrying out acts of terrorism than those of the US? How to explain it?

Most of the migration from Pakistan to the UK took place from the uneducated or ill-educated rural milieu—–landless workers, poor peasants, manual workers and others.Even though they were the more moderate Barelvis when they migrated, many of them have become fierce Deobandis/Wahabis. Their motivation is strong and they are easily impressed by the brain-washing of the Pakistani Mullas.Most of the migration to the US came from the big cities and medium and small towns. They have remained Barelvis even after migrating to the US. The Deobandi-Barelvi impact on the Pakistani diaspora in the US is still weak. Fundamentalist Mullas do not have the same influence on the Pakistani diaspora in the US as they have in the UK.

What is the ethnic background of Faisal?

Some Pakistani sources have described him as a Kashmiri from Nowshera. Others have described him as a Pashtun. It is interesting to note that when news of his arrest by the FBI broke in the Khyber-Pakhtunkwa (Old NWFP) province, many described it as a US conspiracy against the Pashtuns.

What is the lesson for the US from this episode?

The importance of action against the jihadi infrastructure in Pakistan—-consisting of extremist madrasas and the training camps of various jihadi organisations whether located in the tribal belt or Punjab or elsewhere. The equal importance of action against terrorist sanctuaries. Pervez Musharraf took millions of dollars of governmental and non-governmental funds from the US promising to stop the use of the madrasas as jihad factories, but did nothing. The present Government has been taking billions of dollars and military equipment from the US without any action against the jihadi infrastructure in Pakistani territory. The Pakistani rulers—whether civilian or military—- have learnt the art of making an ass of the US by promising to act against terrorism from Pakistani territory without doing anything. The second lesson is that jihadi terrorists—whether Arabs or Pakistanis or others—- are determined to have another successful act of terrorism in the US homeland. They have been unlucky twice, but they will continue trying.

Any other interesting aspect of the case?

It has been reported that some of the messages pertaining to reprisal attacks against the US purporting to be from the TTP were uploaded from Connecticut? Who did so? Faisal himself or somebody else?

http://www.indiandefencereview.com/2010/05/terror-in-ny-q-a.html
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Terrorist haven Pakistan: How Pakistanis threaten world peace

Sunday's GPS where Fareed Zakaria discussed terrorism, pakistan & faizal shahzad


 
Last edited by a moderator:

nitesh

Mob Control Manager
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
7,550
Likes
1,309
^^

This is a gradual change, before 2001 the terrorist image in West used to be Muslim after 2001 it became Arab and in 10 years it changed to Pakistani it is good that people are realizing the root cause of problem.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/13/opinion/13kristof.html

People with links to Pakistan have been behind a hugely disproportionate share of international terror incidents over the last two decades: the 1993 and 2001 World Trade Center attacks; Richard Reid's failed shoe bombing in 2001; the so-called Bojinka plot in 1995 to blow up 12 planes simultaneously; the 2005 London train and bus bombings; the 2001 attacks on the Indian Parliament; and attacks on two luxury hotels and a Jewish center in Mumbai in 2008.

So it came as little surprise that the suspect in the attempted car bombing in Times Square, Faisal Shahzad, is a Pakistani-American.
 
Last edited:

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
Michael Scheuer: Pakistan must get a free pass on Shahzad

Despite Hillary Clinton's rhetoric, Scheuer argues that we cannot levy any consequences on Pakistan, even if Shahzad trained there, because we need Pakistan more than they need us. He contends that they are fighting this war on our behalf and until we are ready to kill the enemies ourselves and quit apologizing for casualties, we can't touch them.

Follow the above link for the video
 

ajtr

Tihar Jail
Banned
Joined
Oct 2, 2009
Messages
12,038
Likes
723
X-posting

Pakistan stands exposed


We in Pakistan should be thankful that Faisal Shahzad was an amateur and thus mercifully failed in his May 1 attempt to bomb the West 45th Street, in Times Square by parking his sport utility vehicle (SUV) Pathfinder. Had he succeeded like Major Nidal Hasan at Fort Hood who shouted Allahu akbar and shot dead several American soldiers, the repercussions on Pakistan would have been formidable.
There are more than a million Pakistanis in the United States of America who would have faced the consequent music. The Obama administration would not have placed them in camps as they did with the Japanese during the World War II but unofficial discrimination could have been a natural outcome.
There is already pressure on Pakistan for not doing enough to control the militants within the country, and for not clamping down on the Afghan Taliban, led by the Sirajuddin Haqqani network which the Americans blame for the Serena Hotel and Indian embassy attacks in Kabul.
India remains unhappy with Pakistan for not convicting the accused in the Mumbai attacks, and for failing to prosecute Hafiz Saeed. The Afghans blame the ISI for all the attacks on the Indians and its security forces within Afghanistan; and the Americans remain dissatisfied with the level of military action in the tribal areas, and the reluctance of the Pakistan military to dislodge the terrorists and the Afghan Taliban from North Waziristan. The American heaviness and stress can already be experienced, despite the Time Square attempt, being a failure.
Friends of Faisal's family are expressing their surprise and calling it a conspiracy against the young man; they fail to realise that terrorists do not have horns or wings and may appear as normal as anybody else on the street. The fact that Faisal seldom, if ever, went to a mosque is not surprising either, as not all the terrorists in the world are Muslims and devout ones. Many are waging a war for nationalistic reasons; and Faisal, if a culprit, may have decided to do it for being angry with the Americans for the drone attacks; for remaining (I am avoiding the word 'occupation') in Afghanistan; for attacking Iraq; for continuing to support Israel against the Palestinians; or for simply refusing him a job or for foreclosing on his home mortgage.
Pakistan's problem is not Faisal. The fact that he is son of a former Air Vice Marshal, and comes from a wealthy family and lived in the United States for the past 12 years, with an MBA from there, and owned a house worth $273,000 in Connecticut's Gold Coast, goes to show that poverty is not the sole cause of terrorism and development, whether USAID funded under the Kerry-Lugar Bill or otherwise, is not going to solve the problem.
We in Pakistan need to realise that free flow of arms, even if in the tribal areas, cannot be allowed to proceed in this day and age. Pakistan perhaps remains the only country in the world where you can buy any kind of weapon, ranging from a revolver to a grenade to a rocket launcher and get it delivered at your doorstep. This practice is naively defended as our culture and custom but the world is unwilling to accept it any longer.
The circumstances surrounding the resistance against the Soviets in the Eighties, and the subsequent ISI support for the Taliban, has been analysed ad nauseam by many and there is no point dwelling on it. What few dare to admit even now is that this resistance was successfully diverted to the Indian occupied Kashmir once the Soviets left in 1988; and when the Taliban came to power. What to talk about Kashmir, some diehards within the intelligence set-up were dreaming of liberating the Muslim dominated parts of China and the whole of Central Asia, and establish a giant Muslim state based on sharia. They were sure of their victory after the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan but they failed.
These elements, however, have not given up. The training camps continue to exist and groups (I would not call them organisations as they are loose groupings using different labels and thus banning them is meaningless) are operating in almost all cities and towns of Pakistan harbouring sectarian, religious and nationalistic ideals and firmly believing in achieving their objectives using violent means.
They mostly get their training in the tribal areas and in some of the other mountainous regions and delivery of arms from the tribal areas has never been a problem. The state, whether led by Musharraf or Zardari, has simply failed to address this problem. This failure, coupled with reluctance, is manifested by the armed forces' current refusal to undertake military action in North Waziristan.
Our policymakers and strategist thinkers underestimate Holbrooke or Hillary Clinton's calibre if they feel that their explanations are convincing them about the bona fide of Pakistan's problems. The fact of the matter is clear to all: Pakistan presently is faced with two kinds of terrorists, those who are fighting the local security forces and waging a war within the country, and those who are fighting the ISAF (International Security Assistance Force), led by the Americans, in Afghanistan and perhaps aided one way or the other by a section of our intelligence set-up.
The military obviously has no choice but to wage a war with those who are attacking them but regard the latter as their potential allies who fit into the doctrine of strategic depth and may potentially once again defeat the Indian supported Northern Alliance forces and take-over Kabul. How can Pakistan then be crushing them when they would be its allies in opposing the Indian influence in Afghanistan once ISAF leaves? The dichotomy is that these so-called allies are also attacking our other allies, namely ISAF.
This cannot go on forever. Pakistan's involvement with the militant groups was exposed when the Americans attacked a few terrorist camps in Afghanistan in 1998, following the attack on its Nairobi embassy and most of the casualties were Pakistanis. Pakistan's role in the terrorist scheme of things was exposed after 9/11, and then following the London bomb blasts and the 26/11 Mumbai attacks. Faisal Shahzad has placed another seal of approval on this plethora of evidence against us!.
 

nandu

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2009
Messages
1,913
Likes
163
'Several' raids over Times Square bombing plot: FBI

Federal agents have raided several locations in the northeastern United States as part of an investigation into the failed Times Square car bombing earlier this month, the FBI said on Thursday.

"We can confirm that several search warrants have been executed in the northeast in connection with the Times Square bombing investigation," FBI spokeswoman Gail Marcinkiewicz told AFP.

"Two individuals encountered during the searches were taken into federal custody in connection with immigration violations," she added.

Marcinkiewicz declined to specify further where the raids occurred, but reports said a home in the Massachusetts town of Watertown was among those targeted by agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Thursday morning.

A Pakistani-American, Faisal Shahzad, was arrested last week in connection with the botched May 1 attack, after he allegedly parked a car laden with a home-made bomb in New York's Times Square.

Shahzad, 30, faces five terrorism-related charges. But he has still not appeared in court or been seen in public since his dramatic arrest on May 3 when he was hauled off a flight to Dubai.

Marcinkiewicz said the searches were "all in connection with Times Square."

"This does not relate to any known immediate threat to the American people or the United States," she said.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Several-raids-over-Times-Square-bombing-plot/H1-Article1-543241.aspx
 

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top