New Assault Rifles for Indian Army

Which Contender`s Rifle has more chances of winning than others?


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WolfPack86

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UAE based Caracal back in race, responds to Indian Army tenders
The UAE based company is set to ensure that the snipers and the CQBs have more than 60 percent indigenous content keeping in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s `Make in India’ initiative.


UAE-based, Caracal is back in the competition for snipers as well as close quarter carbines (CQB) for the Indian Army. The Army is looking for both in an effort to modernize the weapons the soldiers are using.

In September 2022, a request for Information (RFI) was issued by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) for more than 425,000 units of 5.56 mm caliber CQBS.

Talking to Financial Express Online on the sidelines of Indo-Defence 2022 Expo & Forum in Jakarta, Indonesia, Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri confirmed “Yes, we are soon going to submit our response to the Army’s Request for Proposal (RFP) for snipers. And we are also set to respond to the Request for Information (RFI) for Close Quarter Carbines too.”

The UAE based company is set to ensure that the snipers and the CQBs have more than 60 percent indigenous content keeping in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s `Make in India’ initiative.

Why should India consider Caracal?

According to Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri, “The Company is already present in Asia and Africa and is providing best quality products. For India we are sent to provide the snipers as well as CQBs as well as fire arms for the paramilitary forces as well as police forces in the country.”

“The Company has been providing the highest quality of weapons to the forces across the globe and at best cost. In fact a lot of parts are now being made in India,” he added.

The company will offer its CSR 338 rifle in response to the Army’s requirement for snipers. This is chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum cartridges. Caracal’s CAR 816 will be fielded for CQBs. It is the same which has previously qualified after stringent trials which were carried out by the army.

Sniper RFP

In October, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) issued a limited RFP for around 4,849 sniper rifles only to those who had responded to the RFI in June this year.

There was also a requirement of 7,841,575 rounds of .338 Lapua Magnum ammunition issued to around 30 local vendors.

The RFP for the Sniper Rifles runs into 119 pages and will be procured under the `Buy India’ procurement category. There is a requirement of 4,549 bolt-action sniper rifles for the Army, around 212 for the Air Force and around 88 for the Navy.

Caracal is back in 5.56x45mm Carbines race

Last month on the sidelines of the DefExpo 2022 in Gandhinagar in Gujarat, the UAE based Caracal had announced a tie up with an Indian company ICOMM.

On signing an agreement with the Indian company, Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri said that over almost a year and a half Caracal has been sourcing several components from India which will be used in snipers and CQBs.

Al Ameri in an official statement issued last month had stated that the focus was going forward with positive partnership and to respond to contracts in India and to build locally under the `Make in India’ initiative.

Tie up

The MoU between Caracal and ICOMM will witness the production of full range of Caracal’s small arms. These will be produced at Hyderabad factory of its Indian partner.

ICOMM is a group company of Megha Engineering & Infrastructures Ltd (MEIL), and has specialization in military communications systems. And, it has entered in the business of small arms after its joint venture with Caracal.

Competition

Though Caracal now has an Indian partner, it will face stiff competition from other Indian companies who are in the small arms sector including — SSS Defence, the Jindal Group, Kalyani Group, among others.

What is the Indian Army looking for?

Financial Express Online had reported earlier that the Army is looking for CQBs which can be operated in different terrains and under extreme temperatures like minus 20 degrees to almost plus 45 degrees Celsius.

Background

Though the UAE based company was L1 earlier in 2018, the whole project was put on hold as the government was keen on making the CQBs in India and large content to be indigenous. The company, after having successfully cleared all trials, was down selected and was declared L1 to produce around 94,000 5.56×45mm carbines. However, the deal could not go through as the focus shifted to self reliance in the defence sector and to building/manufacturing locally.

In case the company wins the competition

According to a top company executive, in the initial phase there will be some components which will come directly from UAE. And in a phased manner all elements will be manufactured in India by Indian companies and will be used in the weapons.
 

samsaptaka

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UAE based Caracal back in race, responds to Indian Army tenders
The UAE based company is set to ensure that the snipers and the CQBs have more than 60 percent indigenous content keeping in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s `Make in India’ initiative.


UAE-based, Caracal is back in the competition for snipers as well as close quarter carbines (CQB) for the Indian Army. The Army is looking for both in an effort to modernize the weapons the soldiers are using.

In September 2022, a request for Information (RFI) was issued by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) for more than 425,000 units of 5.56 mm caliber CQBS.

Talking to Financial Express Online on the sidelines of Indo-Defence 2022 Expo & Forum in Jakarta, Indonesia, Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri confirmed “Yes, we are soon going to submit our response to the Army’s Request for Proposal (RFP) for snipers. And we are also set to respond to the Request for Information (RFI) for Close Quarter Carbines too.”

The UAE based company is set to ensure that the snipers and the CQBs have more than 60 percent indigenous content keeping in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s `Make in India’ initiative.

Why should India consider Caracal?

According to Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri, “The Company is already present in Asia and Africa and is providing best quality products. For India we are sent to provide the snipers as well as CQBs as well as fire arms for the paramilitary forces as well as police forces in the country.”

“The Company has been providing the highest quality of weapons to the forces across the globe and at best cost. In fact a lot of parts are now being made in India,” he added.

The company will offer its CSR 338 rifle in response to the Army’s requirement for snipers. This is chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum cartridges. Caracal’s CAR 816 will be fielded for CQBs. It is the same which has previously qualified after stringent trials which were carried out by the army.

Sniper RFP

In October, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) issued a limited RFP for around 4,849 sniper rifles only to those who had responded to the RFI in June this year.

There was also a requirement of 7,841,575 rounds of .338 Lapua Magnum ammunition issued to around 30 local vendors.

The RFP for the Sniper Rifles runs into 119 pages and will be procured under the `Buy India’ procurement category. There is a requirement of 4,549 bolt-action sniper rifles for the Army, around 212 for the Air Force and around 88 for the Navy.

Caracal is back in 5.56x45mm Carbines race

Last month on the sidelines of the DefExpo 2022 in Gandhinagar in Gujarat, the UAE based Caracal had announced a tie up with an Indian company ICOMM.

On signing an agreement with the Indian company, Caracal CEO Hamad Salem Alameri said that over almost a year and a half Caracal has been sourcing several components from India which will be used in snipers and CQBs.

Al Ameri in an official statement issued last month had stated that the focus was going forward with positive partnership and to respond to contracts in India and to build locally under the `Make in India’ initiative.

Tie up

The MoU between Caracal and ICOMM will witness the production of full range of Caracal’s small arms. These will be produced at Hyderabad factory of its Indian partner.

ICOMM is a group company of Megha Engineering & Infrastructures Ltd (MEIL), and has specialization in military communications systems. And, it has entered in the business of small arms after its joint venture with Caracal.

Competition

Though Caracal now has an Indian partner, it will face stiff competition from other Indian companies who are in the small arms sector including — SSS Defence, the Jindal Group, Kalyani Group, among others.

What is the Indian Army looking for?

Financial Express Online had reported earlier that the Army is looking for CQBs which can be operated in different terrains and under extreme temperatures like minus 20 degrees to almost plus 45 degrees Celsius.

Background

Though the UAE based company was L1 earlier in 2018, the whole project was put on hold as the government was keen on making the CQBs in India and large content to be indigenous. The company, after having successfully cleared all trials, was down selected and was declared L1 to produce around 94,000 5.56×45mm carbines. However, the deal could not go through as the focus shifted to self reliance in the defence sector and to building/manufacturing locally.

In case the company wins the competition

According to a top company executive, in the initial phase there will be some components which will come directly from UAE. And in a phased manner all elements will be manufactured in India by Indian companies and will be used in the weapons.
Jumla, dalal article. Will not move forward.
 

WolfPack86

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How AK-203 assault rifle deal ends Indian infantry’s long wait
The Indo-Russian joint venture to manufacture the Kalashnikov rifle at an ordnance factory in UP had run into delays because of the Ukraine war


By Pradip R. Sagar: The Indian military’s decade-old hunt for a robust assault rifle—the primary weapon of an infantry soldier—is expected to end soon, with production of the Russian-origin AK-203 assault rifles set to begin in Uttar Pradesh. The joint venture had run into delays because of the Russia-Ukraine war.

The Indian military had been on the lookout for a worthy successor to the homemade INSAS rifle, the basic weapon of its armed forces and paramilitary despite various inherent problems in it. Delay in finding a replacement had led the Indian Army to procure the US-made Sig Sauer rifles as an emergency option in 2019.

Around 671,000 AK-203 rifles (7.62×39mm) will be manufactured at the Korwa Ordnance Factory in Amethi. India and Russia had, in 2019, inked an inter-governmental agreement under which the joint-venture Indo-Russian Rifles Private Limited (IRRPL) was formed.

Speaking at a Delhi-based think-tank last week, Lt General Vinod G. Khandare, principal advisor in the ministry of defence, confirmed that the joint venture for the AK-203 rifle was on track and that the deal was a win-win for both countries. Lt Gen. Khandare said that unlike earlier deals, wherein India used to assemble Russian-licensed weapons, Russians were now setting up manufacturing plants here and the profit/ loss would be shared. “Price negotiations are now being done on India’s terms and not dictated by the Russians. The environment is changing,” he said.

The Indian infantry desperately needs over 200,000 primary 7.62x51mm assault rifles, some 160,000 close-quarter battle carbines, 16,000 7.62mm light machine guns and 3,600 7.62 specialised sniper rifles.

At the DefExpo-2022, held in Gandhinagar last month, Alexander Mikheev, director general of Rosoboronexport, had revealed that the Korwa Ordnance Factory was ready to start manufacturing the Kalashnikov AK-203 assault rifles by end-2022. Rosoboronexport is Russia’s state organisation for export of militaryware.

Mikheev added that 100 per cent localisation of the legendary Russian assault rifle would be achieved during production in India. The indigenous content would be increased in batches of 20,000-40,000 rifles, gradually from 5 per cent to 100 per cent, followed by plans to produce totally indigenised AK-203 rifles after the first 120,000 pieces.

The Kalashnikov A-200 series assault rifles are in line with current trends in the small arms technology. They are fitted with Picatinny rails for convenient and easy mounting of sights and tactical accessories, enabling effective use under various conditions. The rifles have a folding stock. In addition, a number of other ergonomic solutions have been incorporated to optimise their performance.
 

Corvus Splendens

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How AK-203 assault rifle deal ends Indian infantry’s long wait
The Indo-Russian joint venture to manufacture the Kalashnikov rifle at an ordnance factory in UP had run into delays because of the Ukraine war


By Pradip R. Sagar: The Indian military’s decade-old hunt for a robust assault rifle—the primary weapon of an infantry soldier—is expected to end soon, with production of the Russian-origin AK-203 assault rifles set to begin in Uttar Pradesh. The joint venture had run into delays because of the Russia-Ukraine war.

The Indian military had been on the lookout for a worthy successor to the homemade INSAS rifle, the basic weapon of its armed forces and paramilitary despite various inherent problems in it. Delay in finding a replacement had led the Indian Army to procure the US-made Sig Sauer rifles as an emergency option in 2019.

Around 671,000 AK-203 rifles (7.62×39mm) will be manufactured at the Korwa Ordnance Factory in Amethi. India and Russia had, in 2019, inked an inter-governmental agreement under which the joint-venture Indo-Russian Rifles Private Limited (IRRPL) was formed.

Speaking at a Delhi-based think-tank last week, Lt General Vinod G. Khandare, principal advisor in the ministry of defence, confirmed that the joint venture for the AK-203 rifle was on track and that the deal was a win-win for both countries. Lt Gen. Khandare said that unlike earlier deals, wherein India used to assemble Russian-licensed weapons, Russians were now setting up manufacturing plants here and the profit/ loss would be shared. “Price negotiations are now being done on India’s terms and not dictated by the Russians. The environment is changing,” he said.

The Indian infantry desperately needs over 200,000 primary 7.62x51mm assault rifles, some 160,000 close-quarter battle carbines, 16,000 7.62mm light machine guns and 3,600 7.62 specialised sniper rifles.

At the DefExpo-2022, held in Gandhinagar last month, Alexander Mikheev, director general of Rosoboronexport, had revealed that the Korwa Ordnance Factory was ready to start manufacturing the Kalashnikov AK-203 assault rifles by end-2022. Rosoboronexport is Russia’s state organisation for export of militaryware.

Mikheev added that 100 per cent localisation of the legendary Russian assault rifle would be achieved during production in India. The indigenous content would be increased in batches of 20,000-40,000 rifles, gradually from 5 per cent to 100 per cent, followed by plans to produce totally indigenised AK-203 rifles after the first 120,000 pieces.

The Kalashnikov A-200 series assault rifles are in line with current trends in the small arms technology. They are fitted with Picatinny rails for convenient and easy mounting of sights and tactical accessories, enabling effective use under various conditions. The rifles have a folding stock. In addition, a number of other ergonomic solutions have been incorporated to optimise their performance.
1668873991549.png
 

Super falcon

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Not anymore, after using American made ammunition for Sig.

Previously we use to import guns now thanks to Generals we have to import even bullets.

Perfect time for you to vage Gazba-e-Hind. Naste me Poha Jalebi denge is bar.
War is not good for any one learn from Ukraine war we both nation can't afford it due to our economic and population
 

vishnugupt

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War is not good for any one learn from Ukraine war we both nation can't afford it due to our economic and population
Typical deception from Pieceful.
You are contradicting your Ashmani kitaab which explicitly say vage war against infidels.
War is not the option for weak, otherwise you must remember Pakistan's resolution about 1000 years long war with India.
 

SilentlAssassin265

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How AK-203 assault rifle deal ends Indian infantry’s long wait
The Indo-Russian joint venture to manufacture the Kalashnikov rifle at an ordnance factory in UP had run into delays because of the Ukraine war


By Pradip R. Sagar: The Indian military’s decade-old hunt for a robust assault rifle—the primary weapon of an infantry soldier—is expected to end soon, with production of the Russian-origin AK-203 assault rifles set to begin in Uttar Pradesh. The joint venture had run into delays because of the Russia-Ukraine war.

The Indian military had been on the lookout for a worthy successor to the homemade INSAS rifle, the basic weapon of its armed forces and paramilitary despite various inherent problems in it. Delay in finding a replacement had led the Indian Army to procure the US-made Sig Sauer rifles as an emergency option in 2019.

Around 671,000 AK-203 rifles (7.62×39mm) will be manufactured at the Korwa Ordnance Factory in Amethi. India and Russia had, in 2019, inked an inter-governmental agreement under which the joint-venture Indo-Russian Rifles Private Limited (IRRPL) was formed.

Speaking at a Delhi-based think-tank last week, Lt General Vinod G. Khandare, principal advisor in the ministry of defence, confirmed that the joint venture for the AK-203 rifle was on track and that the deal was a win-win for both countries. Lt Gen. Khandare said that unlike earlier deals, wherein India used to assemble Russian-licensed weapons, Russians were now setting up manufacturing plants here and the profit/ loss would be shared. “Price negotiations are now being done on India’s terms and not dictated by the Russians. The environment is changing,” he said.

The Indian infantry desperately needs over 200,000 primary 7.62x51mm assault rifles, some 160,000 close-quarter battle carbines, 16,000 7.62mm light machine guns and 3,600 7.62 specialised sniper rifles.

At the DefExpo-2022, held in Gandhinagar last month, Alexander Mikheev, director general of Rosoboronexport, had revealed that the Korwa Ordnance Factory was ready to start manufacturing the Kalashnikov AK-203 assault rifles by end-2022. Rosoboronexport is Russia’s state organisation for export of militaryware.

Mikheev added that 100 per cent localisation of the legendary Russian assault rifle would be achieved during production in India. The indigenous content would be increased in batches of 20,000-40,000 rifles, gradually from 5 per cent to 100 per cent, followed by plans to produce totally indigenised AK-203 rifles after the first 120,000 pieces.

The Kalashnikov A-200 series assault rifles are in line with current trends in the small arms technology. They are fitted with Picatinny rails for convenient and easy mounting of sights and tactical accessories, enabling effective use under various conditions. The rifles have a folding stock. In addition, a number of other ergonomic solutions have been incorporated to optimise their performance.
End long wait by proving that russians are as incompetent as OFB
 

WolfPack86

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The wait for indigenous version of AK-203 rifle extended: Production could not start in Amethi, effect of ongoing war between Russia-Ukraine
The wait for the light indigenous assault rifle, which has been going on for 15 years for the Indian forces, has increased further. The plant for AK 203 assault rifles of the Kalashnikov series at Korwa near Amethi in Uttar Pradesh has not started. The shadow of the war going on between Russia and Ukraine for more than 300 days is over the operationalization of this plant.


At present, the construction work of Indo-Russia Rifles Pvt Ltd (IRRPL) plant is going on in the Korwa Ordnance Factory premises.

Now production will start next year
, two-three halls of Ordnance Factory are already ready here. Construction of the production line is underway, including an indoor firing range for rifle testing. Russian engineers and skilled team have been recruited in IRRPL. Who will train the Indian team. Now the production of the rifle is likely to start in 2023.

Aleksandr Mikheev, director general of the Russian arms company Rosoboronexport, has said that Korva was to produce the AK-203 by the end of 2022. The project has got a little late. Indigenous content will be increased from 5% to 100% in a phased manner in a batch of 40,000 rifles.

Delay in the first consignment to be received directly At
present, the three parts of the army have about 8 lakh indigenous INSAS (Indian Small Arms System) rifles. Under this deal, instead of INSAS, the first consignment of 20 thousand AK 203 is to come directly from Russia. It is also getting delayed due to the war with Ukraine. This is a ten year project under the deal. Fully indigenous rifle will be ready after 1.20 lakh rifles.

other two reasons for the delay

  • Tech Transfer- India wants 100% indigenization followed by Tech Transfer. Russia has agreed to 60% only.
  • Rate - The cost of a rifle will come from 80 to 90 thousand rupees. India wants to reduce the rate of this rifle.


Lightweight and all-weather ak-203

  • Speed: 700 rounds of fire capacity in 1 minute
  • Range: 500 to 800 meters ie 1649 to 2620 feet
  • Magazine: 30 rounds in one.
  • Weight: 3.8kg
  • Barrel: 16.3 inches
  • Caliber: 7.62 mm
  • Length: 705 mm
 

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