Naxalite violence in India, Pictures & Videos

bhramos

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Naxalites recruiting young children in their cadres

NEW DELHI: Naxalites are regularly recruiting young children in their cadres known as 'Bal Dasta'.

"As per available inputs, CPI (Maoist) recruit young children from time to time. Such children squads are known as 'Bal Dasta' and 'Bal Sangham'," Minister of State for Home Affairs Ajay Maken told Lok Sabha in a written reply.

Maken also informed the house that government has revised the surrender and rehabilitation guidelines in Naxal-hit areas.

"In order to bring Naxalites into the mainstream, the States have their own surrender and rehabilitation policies. Government has approved revised guidelines for surrender-cum-rehabilitation of Naxalites in the Maoist-hit states which inter alia provides for an immediate grant of Rs 1.5 lakh, a stipend of Rs 2,000 for three years, vocational training and incentives for surrender of weapons," he said.

State governments deal with the various issues related to Naxalite activities in the states. The Central government supplements their efforts over a wide range of schemes, both on security and development fronts, Maken added.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...ldren-in-their-cadres/articleshow/6324818.cms
 

bhramos

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Fighting The Naxalites: CRPF Is Best Option

The Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), the primary paramilitary organization engaged in the anti-Naxalite operation has been under severe criticism. It has been accused of lack of leadership and planning, inefficiency, inability to cope with the situation and unpreparedness. How true and valid are these accusations? Given the situation, is there a better option available to fight the Naxalites?



First, the accusation that the CRPF lacks leadership at the highest level and at the middle level is totally untrue and factually incorrect. Today, next to the Indian Army, in terms of numbers, CRPF is employed all over India from J&K and the Northeast, to fight insurgency. There has been an exponential growth in the CRPF, in terms of the numbers and their deployment in the last ten years. Why? Does this mean, successive Indian governments have been funding and expanding an inefficient force? Inefficiency argument is utter nonsense.

So is the argument that the leadership of the CRPF, especially at the middle level is under- prepared or not suited to the occasion. Those who criticize them, would have never interacted with the CRPF leadership at the top and middle levels, or seen them perform in insurgency situation. Today, the CRPF has one of the most efficient leadership, especially at the middle level, is battle hardened, experienced and has sufficient exposure to fight an insurgency.

The problem however with the CRPF in the Naxal areas is related to space and patience. Each region in India, which is facing insurgency, is unique. What method works in J&K or Northeast might not work in the Naxal region. In fact, the success that the Greyhounds have achieved in Andhra Pradesh in fighting the Naxalites cannot be copy pasted onto Chattisgarh and Orissa. Any force, whether the military or the Greyhounds, if deployed in any of the Naxal affected region, will take time to adjust to the new environment, and evolve best practices. The Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs) can never be the same for all regions from J&K to Northeast.

In this process, the CRPF (or any other military/paramilitary unit) is likely to face initial failures. What the critics also do not appreciate is – the intelligence and operational smartness of the Naxalites. The Naxalites, who are fighting in these States may not have high-powered weapons like those militant groups in Northeast and J&K; but they are smart and shrewd to inflict maximum casualties.

More importantly, the CRPF is operating in a vacuum, where there is no governance. In fact, historically, these regions never witnessed any effective governance from the State. Delivery mechanisms from public health to legal institutions have been extremely weak, which is being exploited by the Naxalites. The people, especially the poor and the downtrodden are not with the State; worse, a sizeable population sympathize with the Naxalites and are a part of them.

What are the options available to the State, outside the CRPF? The local police are ill prepared to meet the situation. Police modernization is a process, which will take at least two more generations, if the political leadership is absolutely sincere. The option of deploying the local police is totally out of the question for the next twenty years. The governments in the Naxal affected States are neither willing nor capable to pursue the path of police modernization.Besides, the Police will have to cooperate between three more States, for the Naxal spread is not limited to one single State. The unfortunate reality at the ground level is that the police force is yet to evolve best practices to cooperate between two 'thanas' (police stations) within the same district; forget cooperation between the States!

Deploying the military and Air force is a much debated issue. It has been argued elsewhere that it is a bad option.

CRPF today is the best option that is available. Other paramilitaries do not have adequate numbers to be deployed in the Naxal region. Nor do they provide the operational flexibility to the government. More importantly, CRPF is much in demand among the Union government, because it demands the least. For example, it will be extremely difficult for any government to deploy a force in a situation with a strict command: "Come what may, you will not respond." Even if there are stones pelted and your writ questioned over and over again, and even if you have to take significant casualties, you will not respond. CRPF, in fact has been deliberately designed to be a soft paramilitary force that is willing to take damage and withstand. If someone accuses the CRPF of being soft, it does not make sense; because it is expected to be so.

The CRPF will take time to understand the Naxal environment and in the process may fail on occasions. This has been the history of all counter insurgencies; with all its technical superiority and military might, the US military has been accused of failure in Afghanistan. When compared, the CRPF is doing a much better job in a hostile environment. It may not have delivered so far. What is needed is better training and equipment. Also, more operational space and time is needed, for them to deliver. Presently, there is no better option.



D Suba Chandran, Deputy Director, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, may be reached at [email protected]

IPCS
The Institute of Peace & Conflict Studies conducts independent research on conventional and non-conventional security issues in the region and shares its findings with policy makers and the public. It provides a forum for discussion with the strategic community on strategic issues and strives to explore alternatives. Moreover, it works towards building capacity among young scholars for greater refinement of their analyses of South Asian security.

Through close interaction with leading strategic thinkers, former members of the the Indian Administrative Service, the Foreign Service and the Armed Forces, the academic community as well as the media, IPCS has contributed to the strategic discourse in India. Its Executive Committee reflects a mix of experience and expertise and is currently headed by Mr. Eric Gonsalves, former Indian Foreign Secretary to the Government.

http://www.eurasiareview.com/201008187155/fighting-the-naxalites-crpf-is-best-option.html
 

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'Peace offer' from Maoists, govt remains cautious Times Now

 
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'Naxalism' in Kerala





sorry only available in Malayalam.........
 
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bhramos

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Villagers' outfit busts Maoist den

Determined to put an end to Maoist terror 25 villagers led by a former bandit king of the Kaimur plateau in Rohtas district attacked a Maoist headquarters on Monday morning. They captured four Maoists and while more than 190 of them ran away. Armed with outdated guns, villagers mounted an


offensive on the heavily fortified Maoist headquarters of the Kaimur-Vindhyachal zone.
The villagers, who have been using licensed weapons for many years, formed a 40-member Kaimur Shanti Sena headed by Ram Bachan Yadav on August 15.

The 25-strong Sena team engaged the ultras in a 26-hour gun battle, which ended on Tuesday afternoon.

The team not only sent the Maoists scurrying out of the area but also forced four of them to surrender with huge cache of arms and ammunition.

A confidant of Ram Bachan Yadav told HT that the Sena team initially attacked about 20 Maoists with 14 .315 bore rifles and 11 double-barreled guns. By Tuesday, more than 170 Maoist reinforcements joined their comrades in the encounter.

Sena member Bahadur Yadav, an aide of the former bandit king, told HT from Kaimur that he had informed the district police about the encounter and asked for reinforcements.

"They promised to send us contingents of CRPF and district police from the Rohtas and Kaimur ranges along with members of the Special Task Force. But they did not turn up. Had they arrived on time, the entire Maoist command would have been netted in one go," he said.

Shahabad DIG Sushil Khopde said he had directed police officers to reach Dhansa and help the brave villagers. "But due to some logistics problems, they could not make it. I will inquire into what went wrong," he said.

Villagers' outfit busts Maoist den - Hindustan Times
 

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Five Security Men Killed In Chhattisgarh Gunfight

Five security personnel were killed in a gunfight with Maoists in a forested area of Chhattisgarh's restive Bastar region early on Sunday, police said.
"Maoists ambushed a police patrolling party drawn from the Border Security Force (BSF), District Force (DF) and Special Police Officers (SPOs) in a thickly-forested area," Inspector General of Police (Bastar range) T.J. Longkumer told IANS over phone.
"Two BSF men, two DF personnel and an SPO were killed," he added.
He said the gun battle took place in a remote area of Kanker district, 250 km from capital Raipur.

Five security men killed in Chhattisgarh gunfight | The Asian Age
 

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Maoist woman leader surrenders in West Midnapore

 
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How many more Indian policemen have to die?
 
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The Centre for Land Warfare Studies (CLAWS)

Dr. N Manoharan
[email protected]

Real time and actionable intelligence is essential for any successful counter-insurgency operation. It is all the more crucial if the enemy is invisible as in the case of Left Wing Extremism in India. Without reliable strategic and tactical intelligence inputs, any counter-insurgency force, however trained and sophisticated it may be, is severely handicapped.

The Indian Maoists have an edge over the government forces both on the quantity and quality of intelligence available to them. They are considered smarter so far on this front. The main reason for this advantage is due to their elaborate spy network, apart from having formal and informal informers. The former include sympathisers at the local areas, nearby towns and even far away cities. Informal informers are those who find the Maoist cause "genuine" and voluntarily pass on whatever information available to them. They could be activists, intellectuals, journalists or lay personnel. The Maoists also rely on open source information, consisting of statements, interviews, press releases and news reports, through which they gauge patterns of thinking and behaviour of the government and its forces to an extent.

As rightly pointed out by the Home Minister P Chidambaram, anti-Naxal operations have to be intelligence-based. However, the governments' intelligence is far from effective, at least with respect to LWE. The issue is not dearth of, but the availability of too many intelligence agencies both at the Central and State levels. Yet, the Central Reserve Police Force, identified by the Group of Ministers as the nodal counter-insurgency force does not have an intelligence arm of its own. It has to depend by-and-large on the intelligence inputs from the state police and intelligence agencies where its units are deployed. Despite presence of numerous agencies, there is neither effective coordination nor sharing of intelligence among these bodies. This should be set right on a priority basis. Coordination should exist at all three levels: within the Centre, between the Centre and the States and among the States. The Central and State intelligence agencies should share information methodically and it must trickle down in real time to the user who is required to take action. To achieve this, a central database or a national intelligence grid should be set up so that all intelligence agencies can pool their inputs for use by any State or Central bodies. Reactivation of Multi-Agency Centre is appreciable in this regard, but it should be fine-tuned to meet multiple coordination and sharing tasks.

Technical intelligence capability of the counter-Maoist forces are presently not up to the mark, both in terms of equipment and human resources. The Army, the Air Force and the nodal TECHINT agency, National Technical Research Organisation, can be approached for the requisite assistance. The above bodies can be of immense help in aerial reconnaissance, communication interception and terrain mapping. It should be noted that TECHINT is less risky and more scientific compared to HUMINT.

More emphasis should be laid on human intelligence on an enemy who is invisible and evasive like a "fish in the water". In this regard, it is imperative to develop a proper network of informers consisting of locals who could be relied on for delivering credible and contact intelligence. Winning the trust of the population would enable automatic flow of first hand information. Efforts should be made to penetrate the rank and file of the Maoists to relay accurate inside information. Such 'soldiers in residence' and informers should be entrusted with suitable communication devices to pass on information in real time. Delayed information is as good as no information. What is also required on an urgent basis is a suitable informer protection mechanism. According to the Home Minister, out of 424 civilians killed in 2010 so far, 192 were informers. Unless informers are protected, it is difficult not only to sustain the present crop of informers, but also to develop their network further. At the same time, intense counter-intelligence should be carried out just to make sure that Maoist informers working within the government and their militias do not succeed. Attention should also be paid to enhancing investigative and analytical capabilities of the local police to tap maximum information from the target population. Intelligence also has to target external linkages of Maoists that are forged for the purpose of procuring arms, training, funds, and propaganda.

Dr. N Manoharan is Senior Fellow, CLAWS
 

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Maoists kill school teacher in Jhargram
 
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Four Maoists nabbed from Orissa's Keonjhar district

 
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India Maoists kill police hostage in Bihar state

Maoist rebels in the Indian state of Bihar have killed one of four policemen they had been holding hostage.


The body of sub-inspector Lucas Tete has been recovered and identified. The fate of the other policemen is unknown.

The rebels had told the state authorities they would start killing the policemen from Thursday unless eight Maoist prisoners were released.

The rebels took the policemen hostage on Monday after a gunfight in which seven other policemen were killed.

Indian security forces have been battling Maoists in several states.

More than 200 security personnel have been killed in the first six months of this year.

Scores of rebels battled with the police, who were on patrol in forests in Bihar's Lakhisarai district, about 150km (95 miles) from the state capital, Patna, late on Sunday.

The body of sub-inspector Tete was recovered in Lakhisarai on Friday morning.

"I presume that the remaining three policemen are safe and sound. We cannot jump to conclusions," senior police official PK Thakur said.

The rebels say they are fighting for the rights of the poor and the landless.

Last year, the Indian government launched a major offensive against the Maoists in several states. The insurgency is seen as the country's biggest internal security challenge.

BBC News - India Maoists kill police hostage in Bihar state
 

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Operations intensified for rescuing hostages, body found

Security forces on Friday (September 3) intensified operations to rescue the three policemen kidnapped by the Maoists even as a body was found in a jungle, which police said was not that of sub-inspector Abhay Yadav, whom the Naxals had claimed to have executed.

The deadline set by the Maoists for killing the other three hostages will expire at 10 am.

"Combined force of Cobra Battalion of CRPF, BMP, STF and SAP of Bihar police intensified anti-Maoists operations for rescuing the policemen kidnapped by the Maoists during Sunday's encounter in Lakhisarai district," Inspector General (Operations), K S Dwivedi, overseeing the anti-Naxal operations said.

BSF helicopters carrying Cobra battalion personnel hovered over the hills in hunt for the Naxalites for ensuring safe release of the hostages, Dwivedi said.

Intense search operations continued in the hilly and forest areas in Dharhara, Kajra and several other places in Bihar's Munger, Jamui and Lakhisarai districts, he said.

Dwivedi said the police have not yet found the body of Abhay Yadav. Maoists claimed to have thrown his body in the forests under Kajra police station in Lakhisarai district.

When contacted, ADG (Headquarters) P K Thakur said they had received information about a body lying in Simra Tari Kodasi forest under Kajra police station "but it was found later that it was not that of Abhay Yadav".

But a leaflet was pasted on the body threatening that the other hostages would meet a similar fate.

Meanwhile, Avinash, self-proclaimed spokesman of the Maoists, telephoned media offices here, reiterating his claim of killing Abhay Yadav, the Manikpur Station House Officer, and renewed his readiness for holding talks with the state government for freeing the hostages in exchange for eight of the ultras lodged in different jails in Bihar.

"We know harming anybody is inhuman, but we are left with no options than taking the extreme step... If the government is really interested in talks, it should halt the strike and pave way for initiating talks," Avinash said.

Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar had yesterday offered talks with Maoists.

The arrested Maoists were being looked after by the state government properly, he said, adding "We expect a similar treatment with the policemen".

"The Maoists claim that they have killed one of the hostages, though we are yet to get any evidence of it. But as they have set a deadline of 10:00 am tomorrow, what is the guarantee that they will release the remaining three?" ADG (Hqs) P K Thakur had said after a meeting at the chief minister's official bungalow yesterday.

The Maoists had warned the remaining three hostages would be killed if the state government did not accept their demand.

The rebels had kidnapped sub-inspectors Rupesh Kumar and Abhay Prasad Yadav, BMP havildar Ehtesham Khan and BMP ASI Lucas Tete after the encounter in Kajra police station area on Sunday, which had left eight policemen dead.

Operations intensified for rescuing hostages, body found- TIMESNOW.tv - Latest Breaking News, Big News Stories, News Videos
 

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Maoists kill one of abducted cops, Nitish still helpless

 
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Armand2REP

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When is regular army going to launch a full offencive? Seriously, what are they doing?
 

bhramos

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When is regular army going to launch a full offencive? Seriously, what are they doing?
IA will never launch attack on them,,,,,,,
i feel its quite bad idea,
the best solution is to lestien and address advasi people's problem, then maoists problems, this will some how reduce human inteligence of maoists.
 

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Maoists kill two CPM leaders in WB

 
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Armand2REP

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IA will never launch attack on them,,,,,,,
i feel its quite bad idea,
the best solution is to lestien and address advasi people's problem, then maoists problems, this will some how reduce human inteligence of maoists.
You going to let them roam around the countryside causing terror while you wait to bring economic prosperity to the region? That is a non-answer.
 

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round up there leaders...line em up against a wall and have them shot.

people will do something wrong if they know they can get away with it...it is human nature. govt must make sure they dont get away and are all brought to task. basically at the end of the day if govt wanted to smash them to pieces they could quite easily. i think govt doesn't want them to shift there operations to cities and towns from jungles...thats why they are not bombing them or getting army to sort them out.

all the while economic progress is also essential in the region.
 

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