NASA still making the most of 6,000-year-old amulet discovered in Pakistan

Neo

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Messages
4,515
Likes
961
NASA still making the most of 6,000-year-old amulet discovered in Pakistan
By Suhail Yusuf
Published: November 18, 2016


The image of the 6,000 years old amulet was discovered from Mehrgarh. PHOTO COURTESY: D. Bagault, C2RMF

KARACHI: A small amulet discovered from the ruins of Mehrgarh, an archaeological site in Balochistan, has been declared as the oldest known lost-wax cast object and its technology is still being used in the world, including by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), to manufacture different metallic objects.

According to a paper published in Nature Communications – a well-cited primary research journal – the wood-wheel-shaped amulet is the first ever example of “lost-wax casting” still in practice.

The imperfect shaped amulet looks green and rusty and was discovered in 1985 by Jean-François Jarrige, a French archaeologist who uncovered a Neolithic Mehrgarh site located near Sibi. But the discovery remained in the dark until it was shined by state-of-the-art lighting and imaging techniques.


The image shows the remains of mysterious Mehrgarh located near Sibi, Balochistan. PHOTO COURTESY: C. Jarrige, Mission archéologique de l’Indus

By analysing the light bounce back from the 2cm-wide amulet, physicist Mathieu Thoury from the French Synchrotron, and his colleagues concluded that the object was carved in a single piece, adding that they did not find any soldering parts even at the joints of the rods. Scientists observed the emitting lights from the amulet shows it was made by pure copper melted at 1,085 degrees Centigrade.

The lost wax casting method

Mehrgarh’s craftsmen used a simple but innovative way to mold the metals in their desired shape.

First they made a copy of the object with any material having low melting point, most probably a lump of beeswax; encased it in a soft clay to form a mold, which was then heated or baked to harden.

Neglected archeological sites

Finally, the molted metal, such as copper, was poured which melted the wax replaced the metal. After the cooling process and smashing the clay model, they got their once piece metal object.

This process is also called “investment casting” and is still used in making of delicate jewellery and small parts of space crafts.

With some advancement, the process was also used to create parts of the Messenger spacecraft which orbited Mercury between 2011 and 2015. It is also used to make numerous metallic parts of the International Space Station.

Speaking to Express News, the key author of the paper, Mathieu Thoury, said: “It is a first discovery which shows the major metallurgy method of lost-wax cast and may have been adopted by other civilisations later on – such as Mesopotamia.”

According to the author, the amulet was carved from pure copper found in native areas.

Mehrgarh – the home of innovation

Mehrgarh was a remarkable site where according to some reports, first-ever dentists were found, and cotton was weaved for the first time.

In April 2006, a team of French scholars revealed that the Stone Age man used flint drills for boring teeth some 9,000 years ago.

French archaeologist Christophe Moulherat and his colleague analysed a total of 11 drilled teeth collected from a Mehrgarh graveyard.

In 2002, Moulherat discovered several threads preserved by mineralisation, which are the earliest known examples of cotton thread. The cotton fibres were preserved in copper beads and the study suggested that Mehrgarh was a home for textile making.

Sadly, much of the part of this important site has been destroyed due to tribal clashes.

The writer is a Features Editor at the Express News web desk
 

Indx TechStyle

Kitty mod
Mod
Joined
Apr 29, 2015
Messages
14,985
Likes
35,651
Country flag
As per my information, Pakistan was based on Islam and there were no Muslims in this area 600 years ago.:rolleyes:
No one can claim this civilization to be "Pakistani". Pakistan was based on Religion, not geography at all.
 

aditya10r

Mera Bharat mahan
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2016
Messages
5,701
Likes
11,476
Country flag
As per my information, Pakistan was based on Islam and there were no Muslims in this area 600 years ago.:rolleyes:
No one can claim this civilization to be "Pakistani". Pakistan was based on Religion, not geography at all.
You forgot the most important point

They are sons of aliens with no direct or indirect relation with India
 

republic_roi97

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
1,952
Likes
2,635
Country flag
NASA still making the most of 6,000-year-old amulet discovered in Pakistan
By Suhail Yusuf
Published: November 18, 2016


The image of the 6,000 years old amulet was discovered from Mehrgarh. PHOTO COURTESY: D. Bagault, C2RMF

KARACHI: A small amulet discovered from the ruins of Mehrgarh, an archaeological site in Balochistan, has been declared as the oldest known lost-wax cast object and its technology is still being used in the world, including by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), to manufacture different metallic objects.

According to a paper published in Nature Communications – a well-cited primary research journal – the wood-wheel-shaped amulet is the first ever example of “lost-wax casting” still in practice.

The imperfect shaped amulet looks green and rusty and was discovered in 1985 by Jean-François Jarrige, a French archaeologist who uncovered a Neolithic Mehrgarh site located near Sibi. But the discovery remained in the dark until it was shined by state-of-the-art lighting and imaging techniques.


The image shows the remains of mysterious Mehrgarh located near Sibi, Balochistan. PHOTO COURTESY: C. Jarrige, Mission archéologique de l’Indus

By analysing the light bounce back from the 2cm-wide amulet, physicist Mathieu Thoury from the French Synchrotron, and his colleagues concluded that the object was carved in a single piece, adding that they did not find any soldering parts even at the joints of the rods. Scientists observed the emitting lights from the amulet shows it was made by pure copper melted at 1,085 degrees Centigrade.

The lost wax casting method

Mehrgarh’s craftsmen used a simple but innovative way to mold the metals in their desired shape.

First they made a copy of the object with any material having low melting point, most probably a lump of beeswax; encased it in a soft clay to form a mold, which was then heated or baked to harden.

Neglected archeological sites

Finally, the molted metal, such as copper, was poured which melted the wax replaced the metal. After the cooling process and smashing the clay model, they got their once piece metal object.

This process is also called “investment casting” and is still used in making of delicate jewellery and small parts of space crafts.

With some advancement, the process was also used to create parts of the Messenger spacecraft which orbited Mercury between 2011 and 2015. It is also used to make numerous metallic parts of the International Space Station.

Speaking to Express News, the key author of the paper, Mathieu Thoury, said: “It is a first discovery which shows the major metallurgy method of lost-wax cast and may have been adopted by other civilisations later on – such as Mesopotamia.”

According to the author, the amulet was carved from pure copper found in native areas.

Mehrgarh – the home of innovation

Mehrgarh was a remarkable site where according to some reports, first-ever dentists were found, and cotton was weaved for the first time.

In April 2006, a team of French scholars revealed that the Stone Age man used flint drills for boring teeth some 9,000 years ago.

French archaeologist Christophe Moulherat and his colleague analysed a total of 11 drilled teeth collected from a Mehrgarh graveyard.

In 2002, Moulherat discovered several threads preserved by mineralisation, which are the earliest known examples of cotton thread. The cotton fibres were preserved in copper beads and the study suggested that Mehrgarh was a home for textile making.

Sadly, much of the part of this important site has been destroyed due to tribal clashes.

The writer is a Features Editor at the Express News web desk
Its a precursor of Indus Valley civilisation, something that you guys despise yourselves of. I am proud of this small town, do you know why ? Because my ancestors evolved out of Indus Valley civilisation and resisted to give up their culture, tradition and way of life. That is part of the landmass where Vedas were written, which forms the basis of Dharma, something that you guys have long forgotten about. So, being proud of that, would mean being proud of Sanatan Dharma, which you guys despise of.
So you brought the troll on yourselves.
 

republic_roi97

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
1,952
Likes
2,635
Country flag
NASA still making the most of 6,000-year-old amulet discovered in Pakistan
By Suhail Yusuf
Published: November 18, 2016


The image of the 6,000 years old amulet was discovered from Mehrgarh. PHOTO COURTESY: D. Bagault, C2RMF

KARACHI: A small amulet discovered from the ruins of Mehrgarh, an archaeological site in Balochistan, has been declared as the oldest known lost-wax cast object and its technology is still being used in the world, including by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), to manufacture different metallic objects.

According to a paper published in Nature Communications – a well-cited primary research journal – the wood-wheel-shaped amulet is the first ever example of “lost-wax casting” still in practice.

The imperfect shaped amulet looks green and rusty and was discovered in 1985 by Jean-François Jarrige, a French archaeologist who uncovered a Neolithic Mehrgarh site located near Sibi. But the discovery remained in the dark until it was shined by state-of-the-art lighting and imaging techniques.


The image shows the remains of mysterious Mehrgarh located near Sibi, Balochistan. PHOTO COURTESY: C. Jarrige, Mission archéologique de l’Indus

By analysing the light bounce back from the 2cm-wide amulet, physicist Mathieu Thoury from the French Synchrotron, and his colleagues concluded that the object was carved in a single piece, adding that they did not find any soldering parts even at the joints of the rods. Scientists observed the emitting lights from the amulet shows it was made by pure copper melted at 1,085 degrees Centigrade.

The lost wax casting method

Mehrgarh’s craftsmen used a simple but innovative way to mold the metals in their desired shape.

First they made a copy of the object with any material having low melting point, most probably a lump of beeswax; encased it in a soft clay to form a mold, which was then heated or baked to harden.

Neglected archeological sites

Finally, the molted metal, such as copper, was poured which melted the wax replaced the metal. After the cooling process and smashing the clay model, they got their once piece metal object.

This process is also called “investment casting” and is still used in making of delicate jewellery and small parts of space crafts.

With some advancement, the process was also used to create parts of the Messenger spacecraft which orbited Mercury between 2011 and 2015. It is also used to make numerous metallic parts of the International Space Station.

Speaking to Express News, the key author of the paper, Mathieu Thoury, said: “It is a first discovery which shows the major metallurgy method of lost-wax cast and may have been adopted by other civilisations later on – such as Mesopotamia.”

According to the author, the amulet was carved from pure copper found in native areas.

Mehrgarh – the home of innovation

Mehrgarh was a remarkable site where according to some reports, first-ever dentists were found, and cotton was weaved for the first time.

In April 2006, a team of French scholars revealed that the Stone Age man used flint drills for boring teeth some 9,000 years ago.

French archaeologist Christophe Moulherat and his colleague analysed a total of 11 drilled teeth collected from a Mehrgarh graveyard.

In 2002, Moulherat discovered several threads preserved by mineralisation, which are the earliest known examples of cotton thread. The cotton fibres were preserved in copper beads and the study suggested that Mehrgarh was a home for textile making.

Sadly, much of the part of this important site has been destroyed due to tribal clashes.

The writer is a Features Editor at the Express News web desk
Its a precursor of Indus Valley civilisation, something that you guys despise yourselves of. I am proud of this small town, do you know why ? Because my ancestors evolved out of Indus Valley civilisation and resisted to give up their culture, tradition and way of life. That is part of the landmass where Vedas were written, which forms the basis of Dharma, something that you guys have long forgotten about. So, being proud of that, would mean being proud of Sanatan Dharma, which you guys despise of.
So you brought the troll on yourselves.
 

sorcerer

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2013
Messages
24,677
Likes
87,804
Country flag
Once a rich land with culture and hardworking people ..now an IVY LEAGUE OF TERRORISM
 

angeldude13

Lestat De Lioncourt
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2010
Messages
2,500
Likes
3,970
Country flag
Rouhani muzzies were there in pakistan 6000 years ago you evil yendoos :tongue:
Pakistan was meant to be al bakistan....
 

G10

Regular Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2015
Messages
460
Likes
616
Country flag
Indus valley civilization was not islamic. Arabs and turks cannot claim it as theirs. This amulet belongs to ancient indus valley civilization. To claim it as pakistani pakistanis has to accept its original non islamic roots and deny arab and turk lineage.
 

vinuzap

Regular Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
509
Likes
690
indus and research on dwarka really hunts back to ancient indian civilization


 

Syd

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
74
Likes
53
Country flag
Rouhani muzzies were there in pakistan 6000 years ago you evil yendoos :tongue:
Pakistan was meant to be al bakistan....
I was talking to a colleague who is of Turkish Cypriot origin and a strict Sunni Muslim. He tells me that they believe that humans are all descended from Adam and Eve and humankind is some 4000 years old. I should have mentioned that we are scientists and this guy has a degree in Electronic Engineering from a British University!

So assuming all this is true who wher these aliens casting amulets in Pakistan?
 

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top