Myanmar Coup d'etat & it's impact on India

Tshering22

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GoI is wary of insurgency being fuelled by the Chinks and Pakis in Mizoram, if they force out these fellas back to Myanmar. They do have the local sympathies
Mizoram has been dormant for a long time and that's due to the elimination of terrorism in the state. The people there are no longer the hateful groups that were there in the 90s. COIN operations combined with public outreach keeps them Indian - albeit a Xtian version of us. Chinese won't be able to do shit if we play hardball. The reality is that they are already involved heavily in the terror groups in Nagaland and Manipur and cannot make it worse at this point.

China is as much hard-pressed as it tries to lash out everywhere. Himalayan borders, South China Sea, Sea of Japan, combined with internal resource crunch, power crisis, floods, a dropping economy and political tensions... CCP isn't going to do much at this time. They know QUAD is softer economic arm but they also know that AUKUS is not a joke. They mean business and they are here to stay.

Keeping these factors in mind, we should play hardball and send the escapee government officers back. Junta supported us when they did combined COIN operations against terror groups at GOI's request. If we keep these people here, we will lose their support.
 

Covfefe

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The reality is that they are already involved heavily in the terror groups in Nagaland and Manipur and cannot make it worse at this point.
Are there any tribe commonalities across Mizoram and Nagaland/Manipur? Meities if I recall correctly are present in both Nagaland and Manipur. Mizos are entirely different or have same set of common tribal roots? Or the Christianisation has watered down the tribal identities? The name of the tribes do not suggest any common roots with those in Manipur
 

mushahary

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Are there any tribe commonalities across Mizoram and Nagaland/Manipur? Meities if I recall correctly are present in both Nagaland and Manipur. Mizos are entirely different or have same set of common tribal roots? Or the Christianisation has watered down the tribal identities? The name of the tribes do not suggest any common roots with those in Manipur
There are basically three group of people in these states.
1. the Nagas
2. Meities
3. Kuki-chin-zo people.

the Nagas and meities were the first to settle in there place in prehistoric period. The Nagas came in waves from east and settled in all the hills extending from western Burma to central Assam hill districts (present day Nagaland,northern and eastern Manipur, eastern AP,central hill districts of Assam) . The so called Nagas are not even one group rather just a political identity that was created after 1947. Many tribe still identify themselves by their tribe names. all the Nagas tribes can be classified into dozen main groups who share some similarity in their custom and language for eg. the Zelianrong family group composing of Zeliang rongmei-Kabui and few other smaller groups who have some similarity in their language and tribal custom. However similarity does not mean mutually intelligible language. Similarly Ao, lothas are another family group. And eastern nagaland groups are just different bunch all together. All of these diverse group are now bunched as “Nagas” even by GOI which is a kind of major win for separatist group where as majority civilians simply see themselves as just some tribe living in Nagaland, Manipur,AP and Assam. There are hundreds of them, some smaller ones like Maram,chiro are probably not even known beyond their land and simply reffered to as Nagas while they are completely unique in their own rights and have no political affiliation except to the republic.
the Meitie people probably came with same wave as the naga people, but unlike the Naga people they did not settle in hill ridges instead they settled in Imphal valley and extended their population upto the plains of Assam Barak valley. There was (and still is) considerable similarity between customs of Meiti people and surrounding Naga people in the hills, specially the eastern rongmei/Kabui tribe. Overtime due to settlement in valleys they came in contact with other tribal kingdom in the plains of Assam (Bodo-Dimasa-kachari ) ,ahoms and adopted their culture and eventually got aryanised. They kept certain habits of their tribal past though, like raiding settlements across the hills in Burma for which they and Assam paid a heavy price later in history and changed the political nature of the entire n.e.

the Mizo-Kuki-chin people are the last to arrive in their present location(only a few hundreds years ago). These people also came in waves from east and settle in the mountain areas not occupied by the Naga tribes. They followed the same trail as the Naga/Meiti people before them but in search of vacant places they moved further south and occupy the lushei hills , southern hilly districts of Manipur, eastern hills of Manipur and central Assam district of Dina Hasao as well as a large number in eastern Burma. They are also separate group of people with each having different custom and language but some how more closer to each another unlike the Nagas. The people who settled in the present day Mizoram collectievly called them as mi-zo( people of highlands) where as truth they are different tribes like lusher, hmar, Paite,baite,kom, hrankhowl, vaiphei etc.
a kom in Assam or Manipur south and west will identify itself simply as kom, while the same tribe member will identify oneself as Mizo in Mizoram. A hmar in Assam dimahasoa district is just a hmar but will be indentified as Mizo in Mizoram.

to add to the confusion there are some Kuki-chin group like “anal” who identify themselves as Naga And Naga tribes like Maram or chiro refused to be called Naga.
 

mushahary

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Are there any tribe commonalities across Mizoram and Nagaland/Manipur? Meities if I recall correctly are present in both Nagaland and Manipur. Mizos are entirely different or have same set of common tribal roots? Or the Christianisation has watered down the tribal identities? The name of the tribes do not suggest any common roots with those in Manipur
(I edited the answer but couldnot submit as the time lapsed. Please read this as reply and ignore the previous reply.)

the answer is complicated, and not simple yes or no. The meitis live only in Imphal valley while Nagas and (Mizo) live in much more bigger territories extending many states. Religion matters but not upto the extent as many people believe here. We have Christian extremist groups like NSCN groups as well as Hindu/sanamahist extremist groups of Manipur too while people in Mizoram mostly shun violence unless provoked.
There are basically three group of people in these states.

1. the Nagas
2. Meities
3. Kuki-chin-zo people.

the Nagas and meities were the first to settle in there place in prehistoric period. The Nagas came in waves from east and settled in all the hills extending from western Burma to central Assam hill districts (present day Nagaland,northern and eastern Manipur, eastern AP,central hill districts of Assam) . The so called Nagas are not even one group rather just a political identity that was created after 1947. Many tribe still identify themselves by their tribe names. all the Nagas tribes can be classified into dozen main groups who share some similarity in their custom and language for eg. the Zelianrong family group composing of Zeliang rongmei-Kabui and few other smaller groups who have some similarity in their language and tribal custom. However similarity does not mean mutually intelligible language. Similarly Ao, lothas are another family group. And eastern nagaland groups are just different bunch all together. All of these diverse group are now bunched as “Nagas” even by GOI which is a kind of major win for separatist group where as majority civilians simply see themselves as just some tribe living in Nagaland, Manipur,AP and Assam. There are hundreds of them, some smaller ones like Maram,chiro are probably not even known beyond their land and simply reffered to as Nagas while they are completely unique in their own rights and have no political affiliation except to the republic.
the Meitie people probably came with same wave as the naga people, but unlike the Naga people they did not settle in hill ridges instead they settled in Imphal valley and extended their population upto the plains of Assam Barak valley. There was (and still is) considerable similarity between customs of Meiti people and surrounding Naga people in the hills, specially the eastern rongmei/Kabui tribe. Overtime due to settlement in valleys they came in contact easily with other tribal aryanised kingdom in the plains of Assam (Bodo-Dimasa-kachari ) ,ahoms and adopted their culture and eventually got aryanised. They kept certain habits of their tribal past though, like raiding settlements across the hills in Burma for which they and Assam paid a heavy price later in history and changed the political nature of the entire n.e.😒

the Mizo-Kuki-chin people are the last to arrive in their present location(only a few hundreds years ago). These people also came in waves from east and settle in the mountain areas not occupied by the Naga tribes. They followed the same trail as the Naga/Meiti people before them but in search of vacant places they moved further south and occupy the lushei hills , southern hilly districts of Manipur, eastern hills of Manipur and central Assam district of Dima Hasao ,hills of Tripura, western Bangladesh as well as a large number in eastern Burma(the one who are seeking refuge in India now ). They are also separate group of people with each having different custom and language but some how more closer to each another unlike the Nagas. The people who settled in the present day Mizoram collectievly called them as mi-zo( people of highlands) where as truth they are different tribes like lushei, hmar, Paite,baite,kom, hrankhowl, vaiphei etc.
a kom in Assam or Manipur south and west will identify itself simply as kom, while the same tribe member will identify oneself as Mizo in Mizoram. A hmar in Assam dimahasoa district is just a hmar but will be indentified as Mizo in Mizoram.

to add to the confusion there are some Kuki-chin group like “anal” who identify themselves as Naga And Naga tribes like Maram or chiro refused to be called Naga.
 
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Covfefe

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(I edited the answer but couldnot submit as the time lapsed. Please read this as reply and ignore the previous reply.)

the answer is complicated, and not simple yes or no. The meitis live only in Imphal valley while Nagas and (Mizo) live in much more bigger territories extending many states. Religion matters but not upto the extent as many people believe here. We have Christian extremist groups like NSCN groups as well as Hindu/sanamahist extremist groups of Manipur too while people in Mizoram mostly shun violence unless provoked.
There are basically three group of people in these states.

1. the Nagas
2. Meities
3. Kuki-chin-zo people.

the Nagas and meities were the first to settle in there place in prehistoric period. The Nagas came in waves from east and settled in all the hills extending from western Burma to central Assam hill districts (present day Nagaland,northern and eastern Manipur, eastern AP,central hill districts of Assam) . The so called Nagas are not even one group rather just a political identity that was created after 1947. Many tribe still identify themselves by their tribe names. all the Nagas tribes can be classified into dozen main groups who share some similarity in their custom and language for eg. the Zelianrong family group composing of Zeliang rongmei-Kabui and few other smaller groups who have some similarity in their language and tribal custom. However similarity does not mean mutually intelligible language. Similarly Ao, lothas are another family group. And eastern nagaland groups are just different bunch all together. All of these diverse group are now bunched as “Nagas” even by GOI which is a kind of major win for separatist group where as majority civilians simply see themselves as just some tribe living in Nagaland, Manipur,AP and Assam. There are hundreds of them, some smaller ones like Maram,chiro are probably not even known beyond their land and simply reffered to as Nagas while they are completely unique in their own rights and have no political affiliation except to the republic.
the Meitie people probably came with same wave as the naga people, but unlike the Naga people they did not settle in hill ridges instead they settled in Imphal valley and extended their population upto the plains of Assam Barak valley. There was (and still is) considerable similarity between customs of Meiti people and surrounding Naga people in the hills, specially the eastern rongmei/Kabui tribe. Overtime due to settlement in valleys they came in contact easily with other tribal aryanised kingdom in the plains of Assam (Bodo-Dimasa-kachari ) ,ahoms and adopted their culture and eventually got aryanised. They kept certain habits of their tribal past though, like raiding settlements across the hills in Burma for which they and Assam paid a heavy price later in history and changed the political nature of the entire n.e.😒

the Mizo-Kuki-chin people are the last to arrive in their present location(only a few hundreds years ago). These people also came in waves from east and settle in the mountain areas not occupied by the Naga tribes. They followed the same trail as the Naga/Meiti people before them but in search of vacant places they moved further south and occupy the lushei hills , southern hilly districts of Manipur, eastern hills of Manipur and central Assam district of Dima Hasao ,hills of Tripura, western Bangladesh as well as a large number in eastern Burma(the one who are seeking refuge in India now ). They are also separate group of people with each having different custom and language but some how more closer to each another unlike the Nagas. The people who settled in the present day Mizoram collectievly called them as mi-zo( people of highlands) where as truth they are different tribes like lushei, hmar, Paite,baite,kom, hrankhowl, vaiphei etc.
a kom in Assam or Manipur south and west will identify itself simply as kom, while the same tribe member will identify oneself as Mizo in Mizoram. A hmar in Assam dimahasoa district is just a hmar but will be indentified as Mizo in Mizoram.

to add to the confusion there are some Kuki-chin group like “anal” who identify themselves as Naga And Naga tribes like Maram or chiro refused to be called Naga.
Thanks for the detailed post. You from NE or stayed there?
 

Tshering22

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Are there any tribe commonalities across Mizoram and Nagaland/Manipur? Meities if I recall correctly are present in both Nagaland and Manipur. Mizos are entirely different or have same set of common tribal roots? Or the Christianisation has watered down the tribal identities? The name of the tribes do not suggest any common roots with those in Manipur
Yes, you are correct. Meiteis and Nagas are both present in each others' states. But that is due to the larger Assam which was later partitioned considering the majority tribes of each state. Mizos likewise are separate tribes. Today they know that as long as they are not separating, they get to continue their normal lives. Generally, Mizos are decent people today overall and don't approve of separatism except for some crazy offshoot gunrunners who operate transnationally.

But that is not the problem. The separatism by these people is a twisted communist-Baptist Church-funded (US churches) militancy that is designed to create a Christian nation like the Philippines in the northeast region. They want to take control using Chinese-funded Maoism fused with Baptist Christianity theology. It seems like a weird combination of trying to fuse commie atheistic principles with Christianity, but if you see their ideologies, they are quite similar.

Anthony Shimray, the leader of NSCN is hiding in China where he is funded and protected by the CCP.
 

Tshering22

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GoI is wary of insurgency being fuelled by the Chinks and Pakis in Mizoram, if they force out these fellas back to Myanmar. They do have the local sympathies
Not all of them. We can always play the nationality card and get them out. no Mizo will start an insurgency for a bunch of escapees.
 

avknight1408

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Looks like North East militants are acting as mercenaries for Myanmar military against the resistance.

----xxx----

Rebel Fighters From India Cooperating With Myanmar Military Regime

Tamu, a town bordering India in Sagaing Region in Myanmar’s west, used to engage in lively trade with India, but is now in a state of rebellion against the military regime.

After the Myanmar military’s February 1 coup, Tamu was one of the first towns to take up arms against the junta, following a bloody crackdown on anti-regime protesters. Tamu is now the site of competing armed forces, with local civilian resistance fighters facing not only junta soldiers, but groups of Pyu Saw Htee – a militia armed and trained by the regime – and Meitei rebels who are cooperating with the Myanmar military.

Meitei people are an ethnic group native to Manipur State in northeastern India, and are also known as Manipuri people. Myanmar is home to a sizeable community of Meitei, who are called ‘Kathe’ in Burmese.

Some Meitei rebel groups have been fighting the Indian government from bases along the Myanmar-India border including in Tamu Township, which shares a 78-mile-long border with Manipur State.

The Tamu Security Group (TSG) recently released a statement warning Meitei rebels who support or work with the regime not to fight the local People’s Defense Forces. Later, the TSG released another statement clarifying that it was not referring to the entire Meitei ethnic group.

“They [Meitei rebels] have given trouble to various people and are working together with the regime to fight the PDF. So we request and warn the rebel Manipuris in Tamu not to support and cooperate with the regime,” said a TSG member.

There are at least six Meitei rebel groups, according to local civil society organizations, spread across Leshi, Homalin and Tamu townships in Sagaing and Tonzang Township in Chin State, as well as Mandalay Region.

Those groups include the People’s Revolutionary Party of Kangleipak (PREPAK), the People’s Liberation Army of Manipur (PLA-MP), the United National Liberation Front of Manipur (UNLF), the United People’s Party of Kangleipak (UPPK), the Kanglei Yawol Kanna Lup (KYKL) and the Kanleipak Communist Party (KCP).

The groups also have ties with the National Socialist Council of Nagaland-Khaplang (NSCN-K) in the Naga Self-Administered Zone of Sagaing Region. The NSCN-K is an ethnic Naga armed group pushing to establish a sovereign Naga homeland. Some of the groups own businesses in major towns in Sagaing, including Monywa and Kale.

Observers say that since their coup, Myanmar’s military has forced Meitei rebels to share information and work together with it to crush anti-coup protests and armed resistance, as well as driving away Myanmar civilians attempting to flee to India.

Since March, Meitei rebels have been involved when junta troops cracked down on protesters in Tamu. Five Meitei rebels were killed fighting alongside regime soldiers in separate clashes on May 11 and July 24, said the TSG.

Indian newspapers have been reporting the Meitei rebels’ cooperation with the regime since April. They have quoted Indian intelligence officers as saying that the PLA-MP and the UNLF were involved in the lethal crackdown in Kale and Tamu in which 12 civilians were killed.

Myanmar’s military regime met with some Meitei rebel leaders in May, which led to the Meitei rebels agreeing to work for the military regime in exchange for cash and a base in Sagaing Region, according to Indian media outlets.

Locals told The Irrawaddy that it was no coincidence that the commander of the Myanmar military’s North Western Command was in Tamu at the time of the talks.

“Underground Manipuris have been involved in every clash we have fought. In some cases, they were hired by the regime on a daily basis [as mercenaries]. People from Manipur don’t blame us when [Meitei] rebels die in the fighting,” said a Tamu civilian resistance fighter.

The coordination committee of Indian separatist groups, including the PLA-MP and the UNLF, denied the reports that they have fought for the junta. The groups said it was Indian government propaganda designed to smear them.

Despite widespread reports of Meitei rebel groups cooperating with the regime, not every Meitei rebel is willing to fight for the regime, said ethnic Naga observer Ko Aung Tun.

Two young Meitei rebels who fled in August after refusing to fight the local PDF were captured by their group and tortured to death, he said.

“Many of the PLA-MP fighters do not want to fight for the regime. But Myanmar’s military always pressures them into fighting for them or returning to India,” added Ko Aung Tun.

Many young Meitei rebels operating on the Myanmar side of the border do not even have a cell phone to entertain themselves, but have only been used by their leaders to extort money from businessmen at the border. Human rights organizations based in Manipur have kept silent on the issue, said another local observer who wished to remain anonymous.

“I have interviewed some PLA-MP cadres and learned their many terrible stories and how they were coerced by their military leaders,” he said.

Separatist Meitei rebel groups have been operating along the Myanmar-India border since the time of the former State Peace and Development Council junta in the 1990s. The two sides have mutual business interests, said locals.

Despite Delhi’s complaints about continuing insurgent activity by the separatist groups based along the border, Myanmar military leaders have always denied sheltering foreign armed troops in the country. But the military attacked Meitei rebels in 2019 when the military itself, and the then National League for Democracy government, wanted to improve ties with the Indian government, following the fighting with the Arakan Army in Rakhine State in western Myanmar.

The Myanmar military’s North Western Command raided the headquarters of the NSCN-K in the Naga Self-Administered Zone in 2019, and arrested and imprisoned Meitei rebels based there. In May 2020, the Myanmar government handed 22 captured Meitei rebels over to the Indian government.

There have been fewer clashes in Tamu lately, although the TSG said that some 100 junta soldiers have been killed in clashes with resistance forces in the town. Local resistance fighters operate three units in Tamu. The military regime has deployed artillery and extra troops in the town, along with Pyu Saw Htee fighters and Meitei rebels.

“There is a Meitei group operating in the area. They cooperate with the regime and fight and extort money from the people. So we request and warn that group not to be disruptive while we are fighting for democracy,” said a TSG member.
 

Tshering22

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Looks like North East militants are acting as mercenaries for Myanmar military against the resistance.

----xxx----

Rebel Fighters From India Cooperating With Myanmar Military Regime

Tamu, a town bordering India in Sagaing Region in Myanmar’s west, used to engage in lively trade with India, but is now in a state of rebellion against the military regime.

After the Myanmar military’s February 1 coup, Tamu was one of the first towns to take up arms against the junta, following a bloody crackdown on anti-regime protesters. Tamu is now the site of competing armed forces, with local civilian resistance fighters facing not only junta soldiers, but groups of Pyu Saw Htee – a militia armed and trained by the regime – and Meitei rebels who are cooperating with the Myanmar military.

Meitei people are an ethnic group native to Manipur State in northeastern India, and are also known as Manipuri people. Myanmar is home to a sizeable community of Meitei, who are called ‘Kathe’ in Burmese.

Some Meitei rebel groups have been fighting the Indian government from bases along the Myanmar-India border including in Tamu Township, which shares a 78-mile-long border with Manipur State.

The Tamu Security Group (TSG) recently released a statement warning Meitei rebels who support or work with the regime not to fight the local People’s Defense Forces. Later, the TSG released another statement clarifying that it was not referring to the entire Meitei ethnic group.

“They [Meitei rebels] have given trouble to various people and are working together with the regime to fight the PDF. So we request and warn the rebel Manipuris in Tamu not to support and cooperate with the regime,” said a TSG member.

There are at least six Meitei rebel groups, according to local civil society organizations, spread across Leshi, Homalin and Tamu townships in Sagaing and Tonzang Township in Chin State, as well as Mandalay Region.

Those groups include the People’s Revolutionary Party of Kangleipak (PREPAK), the People’s Liberation Army of Manipur (PLA-MP), the United National Liberation Front of Manipur (UNLF), the United People’s Party of Kangleipak (UPPK), the Kanglei Yawol Kanna Lup (KYKL) and the Kanleipak Communist Party (KCP).

The groups also have ties with the National Socialist Council of Nagaland-Khaplang (NSCN-K) in the Naga Self-Administered Zone of Sagaing Region. The NSCN-K is an ethnic Naga armed group pushing to establish a sovereign Naga homeland. Some of the groups own businesses in major towns in Sagaing, including Monywa and Kale.

Observers say that since their coup, Myanmar’s military has forced Meitei rebels to share information and work together with it to crush anti-coup protests and armed resistance, as well as driving away Myanmar civilians attempting to flee to India.

Since March, Meitei rebels have been involved when junta troops cracked down on protesters in Tamu. Five Meitei rebels were killed fighting alongside regime soldiers in separate clashes on May 11 and July 24, said the TSG.

Indian newspapers have been reporting the Meitei rebels’ cooperation with the regime since April. They have quoted Indian intelligence officers as saying that the PLA-MP and the UNLF were involved in the lethal crackdown in Kale and Tamu in which 12 civilians were killed.

Myanmar’s military regime met with some Meitei rebel leaders in May, which led to the Meitei rebels agreeing to work for the military regime in exchange for cash and a base in Sagaing Region, according to Indian media outlets.

Locals told The Irrawaddy that it was no coincidence that the commander of the Myanmar military’s North Western Command was in Tamu at the time of the talks.

“Underground Manipuris have been involved in every clash we have fought. In some cases, they were hired by the regime on a daily basis [as mercenaries]. People from Manipur don’t blame us when [Meitei] rebels die in the fighting,” said a Tamu civilian resistance fighter.

The coordination committee of Indian separatist groups, including the PLA-MP and the UNLF, denied the reports that they have fought for the junta. The groups said it was Indian government propaganda designed to smear them.

Despite widespread reports of Meitei rebel groups cooperating with the regime, not every Meitei rebel is willing to fight for the regime, said ethnic Naga observer Ko Aung Tun.

Two young Meitei rebels who fled in August after refusing to fight the local PDF were captured by their group and tortured to death, he said.

“Many of the PLA-MP fighters do not want to fight for the regime. But Myanmar’s military always pressures them into fighting for them or returning to India,” added Ko Aung Tun.

Many young Meitei rebels operating on the Myanmar side of the border do not even have a cell phone to entertain themselves, but have only been used by their leaders to extort money from businessmen at the border. Human rights organizations based in Manipur have kept silent on the issue, said another local observer who wished to remain anonymous.

“I have interviewed some PLA-MP cadres and learned their many terrible stories and how they were coerced by their military leaders,” he said.

Separatist Meitei rebel groups have been operating along the Myanmar-India border since the time of the former State Peace and Development Council junta in the 1990s. The two sides have mutual business interests, said locals.

Despite Delhi’s complaints about continuing insurgent activity by the separatist groups based along the border, Myanmar military leaders have always denied sheltering foreign armed troops in the country. But the military attacked Meitei rebels in 2019 when the military itself, and the then National League for Democracy government, wanted to improve ties with the Indian government, following the fighting with the Arakan Army in Rakhine State in western Myanmar.

The Myanmar military’s North Western Command raided the headquarters of the NSCN-K in the Naga Self-Administered Zone in 2019, and arrested and imprisoned Meitei rebels based there. In May 2020, the Myanmar government handed 22 captured Meitei rebels over to the Indian government.

There have been fewer clashes in Tamu lately, although the TSG said that some 100 junta soldiers have been killed in clashes with resistance forces in the town. Local resistance fighters operate three units in Tamu. The military regime has deployed artillery and extra troops in the town, along with Pyu Saw Htee fighters and Meitei rebels.

“There is a Meitei group operating in the area. They cooperate with the regime and fight and extort money from the people. So we request and warn that group not to be disruptive while we are fighting for democracy,” said a TSG member.
Looks like a cluster-fck coming ahead for us. The last thing we want is another open border problem.
 

musahary

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Looks like a cluster-fck coming ahead for us. The last thing we want is another open border problem.
OTOH this is the best time end all insurgency. I don't care about democracy and all in Burma. this is the good time extend support to regime and expedite all the things we have been planning for so long. this democracy movement is being carried out by a handful of protestor, most burmese are indifferent to it and doesnot care who remains in power
 

Tshering22

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Action taken

Clearly, they will be expecting something in return and we should oblige. I don't care what we have to give them militarily; we should not turn back. Myanmar is one of the few countries that is friendly and has cultural ties with us. They also want to diversify away from CCP and this is a golden chance for us to take over.

LUH, Rudras or LCHs, ATGMs, corvettes (Kangaloos won't like it), Akash... whatever it takes. At this time we have 2 target areas:

  1. Weaken CCP stranglehold on friendly countries (Lanka & even Nepal being among them)
  2. Honor the goodwill the Burmese government has shown us.
 

Tshering22

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Fishy,

'Russia, China, Iran' axis seems real now

Seems only logical that they do that, isn't it? After all, the more united they get the stronger their clout will be. China is there for all the wrong reasons though. They will leave Iran dry after implementing the $400 billion 25-year oil deal.

Westerners are doing a big mistake by pushing away Myanmar who could be a potential partner like us.

Iran has made considerable progress considering their sanctions and limitations within the country. One would expect them to be like Eritrea or something but they are really quite advanced for a sanctioned country cut off from all modern technological accesses around the world. My worry is that this useless sanctions regime practised by US will only make the push to make China stronger in the coming years and we will have to calibrate our foreign policy with these countries accordingly.
 

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