Movie on Chinese patients buying Indian cancer drugs triggers massive pre-release buzz

nimo_cn

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A new Chinese movie based on the real-life story of a man who bought affordable but unapproved cancer medicines from India for himself and a thousand other patients is creating a sharp pre-release buzz.

Dying to Survive, which has China’s A-list actor’s Xu Zheng acts as the lead, was shot partly in Mumbai and got rave reviews at the recently held Shanghai Film Festival. It is also getting the thumbs-up from critics, who saw it at preview screenings earlier this week.

“Xu will play a drug dealer in the feature, which is loosely based on the true story of a Chinese leukaemia patient who smuggled unapproved drugs from India to get affordably-priced medicine for himself and 1,000 others,” state-controlled China Daily reported.

In real life, Lu Yong borrowed the idea from the Oscar-winning film Dallas Buyers Club, which tells the true story of Ron Woodroof. Matthew McConaughey played Woodroof, an AIDS patient who smuggled unapproved drugs into Texas for treating his symptoms and distributed them to others who had the same disease.

“The 47-year-old textile businessman bought a month’s supply of the Indian generic version of Gleevec, originally developed and manufactured by Swiss drug company Novartis, for around 200 yuan ($32),” the newspaper report said.

“Lu was detained by police in Yuanjiang, Hunan province, and his case of allegedly selling counterfeit drugs is still under investigation,” it added.

Reports about Lu became national news and were widely discussed on China’s social media with many saying that he was a hero. It brought a sharp focus on the expensive cancer treatment in China with medicines purchased from western countries while the same drugs are available in India at much cheaper prices.

“The Indian-made drug Veenat, costing Lu about 3,000 yuan, or around $480 per month, while the Swiss made Gleevec he had been taking before cost him nearly eight times as much. He almost went bankrupt after two years of taking Gleevec,” the report said.

Lu’s actions were, however, illegal as medicines unapproved by Chinese authorities are regarded as illegal here. Zhang Qingsong, Lu’s attorney had then said that his client was not selling drugs to make profits.

“The Indian company offered preferential pricing to him, but we cannot take them as profits,” he had then said.

Dying to Survive follows Lu’s story but the protagonist in the film isn’t shown to be suffering from cancer.

China Film Insider quoted a theatre manager as saying that the film could make over three billion yuan ($450 million) from its theatrical release.

“Dying to Survive debuted in China last month at the Shanghai International Film Festival and won acclaim from festival attendees. At that point, it was projected that the film’s box office would reach one billion yuan ($150 million),” the leading entertainment trade publication said.

“However, the ongoing preview screenings further boosted confidence in the film’s box office performance,” it added.
https://m.hindustantimes.com/world-...elease-buzz/story-fzWQga9G3Evc3o1sU7Y1TJ.html
 

lcafanboy

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A new Chinese movie based on the real-life story of a man who bought affordable but unapproved cancer medicines from India for himself and a thousand other patients is creating a sharp pre-release buzz.

Dying to Survive, which has China’s A-list actor’s Xu Zheng acts as the lead, was shot partly in Mumbai and got rave reviews at the recently held Shanghai Film Festival. It is also getting the thumbs-up from critics, who saw it at preview screenings earlier this week.

“Xu will play a drug dealer in the feature, which is loosely based on the true story of a Chinese leukaemia patient who smuggled unapproved drugs from India to get affordably-priced medicine for himself and 1,000 others,” state-controlled China Daily reported.

In real life, Lu Yong borrowed the idea from the Oscar-winning film Dallas Buyers Club, which tells the true story of Ron Woodroof. Matthew McConaughey played Woodroof, an AIDS patient who smuggled unapproved drugs into Texas for treating his symptoms and distributed them to others who had the same disease.

“The 47-year-old textile businessman bought a month’s supply of the Indian generic version of Gleevec, originally developed and manufactured by Swiss drug company Novartis, for around 200 yuan ($32),” the newspaper report said.

“Lu was detained by police in Yuanjiang, Hunan province, and his case of allegedly selling counterfeit drugs is still under investigation,” it added.

Reports about Lu became national news and were widely discussed on China’s social media with many saying that he was a hero. It brought a sharp focus on the expensive cancer treatment in China with medicines purchased from western countries while the same drugs are available in India at much cheaper prices.

“The Indian-made drug Veenat, costing Lu about 3,000 yuan, or around $480 per month, while the Swiss made Gleevec he had been taking before cost him nearly eight times as much. He almost went bankrupt after two years of taking Gleevec,” the report said.

Lu’s actions were, however, illegal as medicines unapproved by Chinese authorities are regarded as illegal here. Zhang Qingsong, Lu’s attorney had then said that his client was not selling drugs to make profits.

“The Indian company offered preferential pricing to him, but we cannot take them as profits,” he had then said.

Dying to Survive follows Lu’s story but the protagonist in the film isn’t shown to be suffering from cancer.

China Film Insider quoted a theatre manager as saying that the film could make over three billion yuan ($450 million) from its theatrical release.

“Dying to Survive debuted in China last month at the Shanghai International Film Festival and won acclaim from festival attendees. At that point, it was projected that the film’s box office would reach one billion yuan ($150 million),” the leading entertainment trade publication said.

“However, the ongoing preview screenings further boosted confidence in the film’s box office performance,” it added.
https://m.hindustantimes.com/world-...elease-buzz/story-fzWQga9G3Evc3o1sU7Y1TJ.html
Actually it's a huge nexus between western drug and pharma companies and US FDA who are corrupt to core. Many a times they pass drug formulation by taking huge bribes and then they market these drugs to make huge profits. For Western pharma companies all that matters is profit humanity be damn.. also they use third world countries to test their new drugs and hush up things if something goes wrong.

Also these companies market drugs like Nimuslide which is known for renal failure and is banned in USA in third world countries.

3-4 years back Australian citizen Greg Jefferys who was suffering from hepatitis c saved his life by buying medicine in India. The poor chap was on the verge of selling home to buy medicine. Thanks to cheap Indian medicine saved his life. Indian government does not rcognize patents for life saving drugs which is bone of contention between western drug companies, government and govt of India... Also drug price control mechanism controls drug price in India through which govt of India controls profit taking of drug companies....

Cheap AIDS drugs from indIa saved thousands of life in African countries and were approved by UN even though it was opposed by western drug companies.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2015-...-imports-life-saving-drugs-from-india/6712990

@nimo_cn this is the kind of cooperation and people to people contact is needed for better relationship between the two of our great countries instead of hostility.

Before the rise of western world India and China together controlled world in all aspects, be it trade, spirituality, culture, etc and people to people contact too was huge remember dr. Kotnis who saved several lives during Sino japanese war. All this ended with rise of communist party in China.. wish we have better relationship and people to people contact in future to oppose Western hegemony.
 
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The Ultranationalist

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A new Chinese movie based on the real-life story of a man who bought affordable but unapproved cancer medicines from India for himself and a thousand other patients is creating a sharp pre-release buzz.

Dying to Survive, which has China’s A-list actor’s Xu Zheng acts as the lead, was shot partly in Mumbai and got rave reviews at the recently held Shanghai Film Festival. It is also getting the thumbs-up from critics, who saw it at preview screenings earlier this week.

“Xu will play a drug dealer in the feature, which is loosely based on the true story of a Chinese leukaemia patient who smuggled unapproved drugs from India to get affordably-priced medicine for himself and 1,000 others,” state-controlled China Daily reported.

In real life, Lu Yong borrowed the idea from the Oscar-winning film Dallas Buyers Club, which tells the true story of Ron Woodroof. Matthew McConaughey played Woodroof, an AIDS patient who smuggled unapproved drugs into Texas for treating his symptoms and distributed them to others who had the same disease.

“The 47-year-old textile businessman bought a month’s supply of the Indian generic version of Gleevec, originally developed and manufactured by Swiss drug company Novartis, for around 200 yuan ($32),” the newspaper report said.

“Lu was detained by police in Yuanjiang, Hunan province, and his case of allegedly selling counterfeit drugs is still under investigation,” it added.

Reports about Lu became national news and were widely discussed on China’s social media with many saying that he was a hero. It brought a sharp focus on the expensive cancer treatment in China with medicines purchased from western countries while the same drugs are available in India at much cheaper prices.

“The Indian-made drug Veenat, costing Lu about 3,000 yuan, or around $480 per month, while the Swiss made Gleevec he had been taking before cost him nearly eight times as much. He almost went bankrupt after two years of taking Gleevec,” the report said.

Lu’s actions were, however, illegal as medicines unapproved by Chinese authorities are regarded as illegal here. Zhang Qingsong, Lu’s attorney had then said that his client was not selling drugs to make profits.

“The Indian company offered preferential pricing to him, but we cannot take them as profits,” he had then said.

Dying to Survive follows Lu’s story but the protagonist in the film isn’t shown to be suffering from cancer.

China Film Insider quoted a theatre manager as saying that the film could make over three billion yuan ($450 million) from its theatrical release.

“Dying to Survive debuted in China last month at the Shanghai International Film Festival and won acclaim from festival attendees. At that point, it was projected that the film’s box office would reach one billion yuan ($150 million),” the leading entertainment trade publication said.

“However, the ongoing preview screenings further boosted confidence in the film’s box office performance,” it added.
https://m.hindustantimes.com/world-...elease-buzz/story-fzWQga9G3Evc3o1sU7Y1TJ.html

Lol:rofl:naive chinese gook there is no drug in this godforsaken world that can cure cancer, generic or whatever and thats true. Cancer patients often die due to their cancer medication and chemo and radiotherapy rather than of cancer. Give chemo or radiotherapy to a healthy person and see its effect, the person will develop cancer eventually.
 

nongaddarliberal

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Lol:rofl:naive chinese gook there is no drug in this godforsaken world that can cure cancer, generic or whatever and thats true. Cancer patients often die due to their cancer medication and chemo and radiotherapy rather than of cancer. Give chemo or radiotherapy to a healthy person and see its effect, the person will develop cancer eventually.
It depends on the stage at which the cancer is at on the patient. Early stages of cancer are defeatable. And there are multiple drugs that do help in these cases, though they cannot cure the disease on their own. Some treatment is far better than no treatment at all for a cancer patient.
 

dhananjay1

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Selling illegal substandard cheap stuff to other countries, we have learnt from shifu.
 

prohumanity

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It all depends which philosophy you have about life in general. If you believe that "world is my family" (like ancient Indian saying) then, making and selling inexpensive medicines to neighboring countries is perfectly right.
If you believe that huge profits is all about life and nothing else matters..then..you become the friend of big western Pharma who in fact uses all tactics to push extremely expensive medicines.
 

The Ultranationalist

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It depends on the stage at which the cancer is at on the patient. Early stages of cancer are defeatable. And there are multiple drugs that do help in these cases, though they cannot cure the disease on their own. Some treatment is far better than no treatment at all for a cancer patient.
Even in first stage they will postpone death by 7-10 years. The cancer bounces back eventually and patient dies.
 

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